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This book is a longitudinal life history of the lives and work of primary school principals in Ireland. It provides a unique opportunity to peer inside the realities of leading schools in changing times. In a system that until recently did not prepare principals for the onerous roles and responsibilities, a small system with limited mobility, inter-personal relationships emerge as critical, frequently privileged over professional relationships. Consequently, principals struggle to bring about change, to build trust in order to cultivate a transformative leadership agenda, while several aspects of systemic structures and processes emerge as constraints on leadership capacity building. In the absence of comprehensive leadership portfolio development, classroom teachers, catapulted into the principal’s office, tend to be cautious and careful in ways that tend to perpetuate the status quo while putting a premium on the exercise of soft power and an over-reliance on the good will of colleagues. Several of the ‘leadership lessons’ that emerge from this in-depth analysis concur with an increasing international consensus that due to complexity and increasingly performative policy demands, learning about leadership for all is an absolute necessity. However, care must be taken to avoid overly scripted programmes. Critical to the cultivation of a professionally responsible leadership disposition, rather than capitulation to ‘technologies of control,’ is professional renewal cultivated through adequate attention to the Zone of Proximal Distance.
Advance Praise for Moving the Rock

“The future comes at us fast — which means school reformers don’t have time to wait. They need real tools in real time. That’s why Moving the Rock is so important. Grant Lichtman has guidance for anyone — teachers, parents, administrators, government officials — intent on helping young people succeed not ‘someday,’ but today.”

— Daniel H. Pink, best-selling author of Drive and A Whole New Mind

“Grant Lichtman’s book is a clear and comprehensive guide to the “what" and the “how” of educational transformation. Organized around essential levers for change, it is a must-read for anyone who wants to make a difference in our schools.”

—Tony Wagner, Harvard Ilab Expert in Residence, and best-selling author of The Global Achievement Gap and Creating Innovators”

“This book gives me hope for a brighter future in education. Despite the dark clouds imposed by misguided policies, Grant Lichtman diligently tells stories of grass-roots innovations in the classrooms and schools all over the world. Moving the Rock is an inspiring call to action for all educators.”
—Yong Zhao, Ph.D., Foundation Distinguished Professor, School of Education, University of Kansas

“If you have children, or teach children, or want our children to succeed, this is a must-read book. Grant Lichtman throws down the challenge for all of us; that WE can change education, and he shows us just how successful schools everywhere are overcoming change-killing inertia in our schools.”

—Todd Rose, best-selling author of The End of Average; Harvard University

Moving the Rock: Seven Levers WE Can Press to Transform Educationgives educators, parents, administrators, students, and other stakeholders a clear paradigm for transforming our outmoded schools into schools that will help our children to meet the challenges of tomorrow.

It’s no secret that our educational system is stuck. Moving the Rock shows the important roles all of us can play in un-sticking it by moving seven specific levers that will change the focus of education from what we teach to how we learn. Importantly, moving the levers is completely possible today, and in fact is already happening now in many schools.

Drawing on research and extensive experience in the education community, Grant Lichtman outlines the seven essential levers that can profoundly change our schools so that we are teaching all our children how to learn, including

• Creating the Demand for Better Schools

• Building School-Community Learning Laboratories

• Encouraging Open Access to Knowledge

• Fixing How We Measure Student Success

• Teaching the Teachers what They Really Need to Know

• and more

At the end of each of each chapter there are one or more challenges, ways that all of us can collectively turn the pioneering work of others into transformation for all our schools.

A former chancellor and a lineup of stellar educators offer plans and ideas for making education work better for everyone.
 
College is too expensive for too many. Politicians call for more financial support, but approve less. Underpaid, overworked adjuncts teach vastly more than the star faculty members who drew students to campus. Departments and administrations focus more on protecting their territories than on pedagogy or even management. Technology is extolled and resisted, hyped as the force that will utterly transform or deform education. It seems clear that the American system of higher education is broken.
 
In a series of essays collected and edited by Matthew Goldstein, credited with reviving the vast City University of New York, and George Otte, Director of Academic Technology at CUNY, well-respected and innovative educators offer solutions to the fiscal, administrative, pedagogical, technical, and political problems. Among the solutions:
 
* Break the centuries-old models of brick and mortar education and replace it with online, peer-led, and adaptive learning
* Re-envision governance so even reluctant faculty and administrators can once again become invested in education rather than self-interest
* Find innovative ways of promoting the changes American education so desperately needs, including figuring out when and where students are most likely to learn
 
With essays from such thought leaders as Cathy N. Davidson, Candace Thille, Ray Schroeder, James Hilton, and Jonathan R. Cole, Change We Must is a must-read for anyone wanting American higher education to succeed and thrive in these challenging times.
As its title implies, this book has a deceptively simple mission: to prepare would-be school leaders to draw upon a variety of theoretical perspectives when thinking about schools and schooling. It shows how theories can function as cognitive tools to be mastered, carefully stored in one's intellectual toolbox and used to interpret and resolve real world problems. Beneath this goal lies the belief that the most effective leaders are those who are able to construct their own well-grounded interpretations of events and their own responses to those events. Key features of this exciting new text include the following.

Focus on Alternative Theories - The functionalist theoretical views that have dominated administrator preparation programs for the last half-century are reviewed early in the book and are shown to be inadequate to the task of understanding and coping with the complex realities of modern day schooling. The remainder of the book presents alternative views of schooling that, taken together, can be thought of as a theoretical repertoire from which to construct interpretations and solutions to everyday, real-world problems.
Focus on Diversity - Diversity is examined from a variety of viewpoints. Chapter 6 looks at the cultural bases of leadership, Chapter 7 at comparative and international contexts, and Chapter 8 at gender and sexual orientation.
Illustrative Cases - Each chapter contains a case with an embedded dilemma similar to those that real-world administrators confront. While illustrating the particular theoretical view presented in the chapter, these cases are sufficiently complex that they lend themselves to interpretation by any of the other theories considered in the book.

This book is appropriate for graduate-level courses with titles such as Organizational Theory, Theory of School Leadership, or Introduction to Educational Administration. It might also be used as one of several texts in advanced courses on leadership theory.
Boost student success by reversing your perspective on college readiness

The national conversation asking "Are students college-ready?" concentrates on numerous factors that are beyond higher education's control. Becoming a Student-Ready College flips the college readiness conversation to provide a new perspective on creating institutional value and facilitating student success. Instead of focusing on student preparedness for college (or lack thereof), this book asks the more pragmatic question of what are colleges and universities doing to prepare for the students who are entering their institutions? What must change in an institution's policies, practices, and culture in order to be student-ready?

Clear and concise, this book is packed with insightful discussion and practical strategies for achieving your ambitious student success goals. These ideas for redesigning practices and policies provide more than food for thought—they offer a real-world framework for real institutional change. You'll learn:

How educators can acknowledge their own biases and assumptions about underserved students in order to allow for change New ways to advance student learning and success How to develop and value student assets and social capital Strategies and approaches for creating a new student-focused culture of leadership at every level

To truly become student-ready, educators must make difficult decisions, face the pressures of accountability, and address their preconceived notions about student success head-on. Becoming a Student-Ready College provides a reality check based on today's higher education environment.

The networks of Tennessee politicians, school leaders, and academics are rife with significant contributors to the national fabric of educational reform. This cadre includes Former White House Chief of Staff Howard Baker, United States Senator Bill Frist (currently Chairman of the Tennessee State Collaborative on Reforming Education) former United States Secretary of Education Lamar Alexander (currently United States Senator and Conference Chair of the Republican Party) and current Governor Bill Haslam. This network has deep, current ties to The University of Tennessee, the Knoxville area, and school systems across the state of Tennessee. The Center for Educational Leadership is a highly funded, highly visible model for education reform throughout the state of Tennessee. This 3 book series will serve as a calling card for all activities that The Center for Educational Leadership is involved in around the state of Tennessee and the United States. This includes all school leadership summits for policy makers, practitioners, scholars, and legislators. It represents the shared vision and commitment of educational leaders, politicians, educational reformers, and legislators. This book will be distributed to school leaders, professional development coaches, teacher unions, scholars at several Tennessee institutions of higher education, and members of the Tennessee legislature and Department of Education. The audience for this series is primarily school leaders and scholars who are launching and designing new programs or revising and strengthening existing programs. However, those who are discussing policy at the local, state, and national level would be interested in the information given within these pages as it relates clearly to their work in educational leadership.
In this book Reynold Macpherson initiates a politically-critical theory of educative leadership as a fresh line of inquiry in the practice, research and theory of educational administration and educational leadership.

Divided into four parts, the book introduces the sub-discipline of political philosophy to the field of educational administration, management and leadership. It does this by clarifying the knowledge domain of each and identifying how four political ideologies, specifically pragmatism, communitarianism, communicative rationalism and egalitarian liberalism, have primarily informed and surreptitiously provided contestable justifications for power in the development of practice, research and theory in the field of study.

The book goes on to offer three case studies illustrating how political philosophy can be used to interpret how people become leaders and administrators of educational institutions and systems. Additional case studies then demonstrate how crises in governance in educational institutions and systems can be analyzed and improvements made using the tools of political philosophy. The final part uses the sub-discipline to critique the author’s decades of research into educative leadership, and concludes the book by both establishing the relativity of politically-critical critique and the ideology it favours; neo-pragmatism.

Political Philosophy, Educational Administration and Educative Leadership

will provide practitioners, researchers and theorists in educational administration, management and leadership with a deeper appreciation of power by formally introducing them to the assumptions, limits and tools of political philosophy.
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