More related to social work

Family policy holds a particular status in the quest for a more equitable world as it intersects the rights of women, children, and workers. But despite local and global efforts and initiatives, the state of family policy in different areas of the world varies widely.

Through a cross-section of countries on six continents, Family Policies Across the Globe offers the current state of the laws concerning family life, structure, and services, providing historical, cultural, and socioeconomic context. Lucidly written chapters analyze key aspects of family definition, marriage, child well-being, work/family balance, and family assistance, reviewing underlying social issues and controversies as they exist in each country. Details of challenges to implementation and methods of evaluating policy outcomes bring practical realities into sharp focus, and each chapter concludes with recommendations for improvement at the research, service, and governmental levels. The result is an important comparative look at how governments support families, and how societies perceive themselves as they evolve. Among the issues covered:

Sierra Leone: toward sustainable family policies.Russia: folkways versus state-ways.Japan: policy responses to a declining population.Australia: reform, revolutions, and lingering effects.Canada: a patchwork policy.Colombia: a focus on policies for vulnerable families.

Researchers

, professors and graduate students in the fields of social policy, child and family studies, psychology, sociology, and social work will find in Family Policies Across the Globe a reference that will grow in importance as world events continue to develop.

This invaluable reference introduces successful strengths-based programs for aiding families of young children in critical social contexts: family, school, community, and policy. The wide range of systems/contextual approaches described here are based in current understanding of children’s development, stress and resilience in families, cultural competence, and the two-generational approach to intervention. Research-based examples across early care and early learning platforms illustrate the links between parental protective factors and children’s academic and social outcomes, and between family stability and larger social goals. By supporting parents and children equally, the contributors assert, these interventions more fully address developmental and family issues than programs that mainly serve one generation or the other.
Included in the coverage:• Parent and community focused approaches to supporting parents of young children: the Family Networks Project./div• Honoring parenting values, expectations, and approaches across cultures.• Building young children's executive functions at home and in early care and education settings.• Promoting early childhood development in the pediatric medical home.• Neighborhood approaches to supporting families of young children.• Public policy strategies to promote the well-being of families with young children.
Innovative Approaches for Supporting Parents of Young Children benefits professionals and practitioners working to support families of young children, particularly those interested in social work, psychology, public policy, and public health.
Current statistics on child abuse, neglect, poverty, and hunger shock the conscience—doubly so as societal structures set up to assist families are failing them. More than ever, the responsibility of the helping professions extends from aiding individuals and families to securing social justice for the larger community.

With this duty in clear sight, the contributors to Child and Family Advocacy assert that advocacy is neither a dying art nor a lost cause but a vital platform for improving children's lives beyond the scope of clinical practice. This uniquely practical reference builds an ethical foundation that defines advocacy as a professional competency and identifies skills that clinicians and researchers can use in advocating at the local, state and federal levels. Models of the advocacy process coupled with first-person narratives demonstrate how professionals across disciplines can lobby for change.

Among the topics discussed:

Promoting children's mental health: collaboration and public understanding.Health reform as a bridge to health equity.Preventing child maltreatment: early intervention and public educationChanging juvenile justice practice and policy.A multi-level framework for local policy development and implementation.When evidence and values collide: preventing sexually transmitted infections.Lessons from the legislative history of federal special education law.

Child and Family Advocacy is an essential resource for researchers, professionals and graduate students in clinical child and school psychology, family studies, public health, developmental psychology, social work and social policy.
















They are laborers, soldiers, refugees, and orphans. In areas of the world torn by poverty, disease, and war, millions of children are invisible victims, deprived of home, family, and basic human rights. Their chances for a stable adult life are extremely slim.

The powerful interdisciplinary volume Vulnerable Children brings a global child-rights perspective to the lives of indigenous, refugee, and minority children in and from crisis-prone regions. Focusing on self-determination, education, security, health, and related issues, an international panel of scholars examines the structural and political sources of children's vulnerabilities and their effects on development. The book analyzes intervention programs currently in place and identifies challenges that must be met at both the community and larger policy levels. These chapters also go a long way to explain the often-blurred line between vulnerability and resilience. Included in the coverage:

Dilemmas of rights-based approaches to child well-being in an African cultural context.Poverty and minority children’s education in the U.S.: case study of a Sudanese refugee family.The heterogeneity of young children’s experiences in Kenya and Brazil.A world tour of interventions for children of a parent with a psychiatric illness.An exploration of fosterage of Owambo orphans in Namibia.UNICEF in Colombia: defending and nurturing childhood in media, public, and policy discourses.

Vulnerable Children is a must-have volume for researchers, graduate students, and clinicians/professionals/practitioners across a range of fields, including child and school psychology, social work, maternal and child health, developmental psychology, anthropology, sociology, social policy, and public health.

"Tourse, Hamilton-Mason, and Wewiorski discuss major concepts that help explicate the systemic nature of institutionalized racism in the U.S. – with a focus on social construction, oppression, scaffolding, and institutional web – providing insight into racist thought and behavior that construct and mark people of color as 'a problem.' [...] I highly recommend this book for those who are engaged in working to combat domination and racism at the local, national, and global levels."

-Gary Bailey, DHL, MSW, ACSW, Professor of Practice, Director of Urban Leadership Program, Simmons College School of Social Work

This important volume provides a powerful overview of racism in the United States: what it is, how it works, and the social, cultural, and institutional structures that have evolved to keep it in place. It dissects the rise of legalized discrimination against four major racial groups (First Nations, Africans, Mexicans, and Chinese) and its perpetuation as it affects these groups and new immigrants today. The book’s scaffolding framework—which takes in institutions from the government to our educational systems—explains why racism remains in place despite waves of social change. At the same time, authors describe social justice responses being used to erode racism in its most familiar forms, and at its roots.

This timely resource:

Examines the sociology of discrimination as a constant in daily life.
Traces the history of the legalization of racism in the United States.
Locates key manifestations of racism in the American psyche.
Links racism to other forms of discrimination.
Identifies the interlocking components of institutionalized racism.
Offers contemporary examples of resistance to racism.A forceful synthesis of history and social theory, Systemic Racism in the United States is vital reading for practitioners and other professionals in fields related to human rights, social policy, and psychology. And as a classroom text, it challenges its readers to deepen their understanding of both historical process and current developments.
U. S. Social Welfare Reform examines pivotal changes in social welfare for low-income families in the United States between 1981, the advent of the Reagan administration, and 2008, the end of the G.W. Bush administration. It focuses on the change from the Federal-state open entitlement Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) program to the time-limited state run Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) program which Congress authorized with passage of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act of 1996. The book also focuses on the development of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) program, enacted in 1975 against the backdrop of failed efforts to nationalize AFDC which aimed at providing a basic income to all poor families, but which blossomed with continued bipartisan support in the 1990s. This book also explores alternative strategies to assist low-income families, including job training programs. It present original research on the educational and economic well-being of youth from low-income families who participated in government sponsored job training programs in the late 1970 and early 1980s.

The book seeks a middle ground between general and technical social policy texts. It provides more depth than is available in the more general social policy texts. Further, while the more comprehensive texts often rely on government documents and reports relying on Current Population Survey data to profile program use, this book relies on panel data from the National Longitudinal Surveys and presents original research that builds upon prior related research and scholarship about the role of the federal government in social welfare provisioning in general and AFDC/TANF and EITC use in particular and on school-to-work transition programs. It presents related technical material in a narrative style better suited to professionals and policy makers who may lack expertise in quantitative analysis.

Despite the numerous benefits derived from major technological and medical innovations of the past century, we continue to live in a world rife with significant social problems and challenges. Children continue to be born into lives of poverty; others must confront daily their parent’s mental illness or substance abuse; still others live amid chronic family discord or child abuse. For some of these children, life’s difficulties become overwhelming. Their enduring trauma can lead to a downward spiral, until their behavioral and emotional problems become lifelong barriers to success and wellbeing.

Almost no one today would deny that the world is sometimes an inhospitable, even dangerous, place for our youth. Yet most children—even those living in high-risk environments—appear to persevere. Some even flourish. And this begs the question: why, in the face of such great odds, do these children become survivors rather than casualties of their environments? For many decades, scholars have pursued answers to the mysteries of resilience. Now, having culled several decades of research findings, the editors of this volume offer an in-depth, leading-edge description and analysis of Resilience in Children, Families and Communities: Linking Context to Practice and Policy.

The book is divided into three readily accessible sections that both define the scope and limits of resilience as well as provide hands-on programs that families, neighborhoods, and communities can implement. In addition, several chapters provide real-life intervention strategies and social policies that can be readily put into practice. The goal: to enable children to develop more effective problem-solving skills, to help each child to improve his or her self-image, and to define ways in which role models can affect positive outcomes throughout each child’s lifetime.

For researchers, clinicians, and students, Resilience in Children, Families and Communities: Linking Context to Practice and Policy is an essential addition to their library. It provides practical information to inform greater success in the effort to encourage resilience in all children and to achieve positive youth development.

This social work book is the first of its kind, describing practical steps that social workers can take to shape and influence both policy and politics. It prepares social workers and social work students to impact political action and subsequent policy, with a detailed real-world framework for turning ideas into concrete goals and strategies for effecting change. Tracing the roots of social work in response to systemic social inequality, it clearly relates the tenets of social work to the challenges and opportunities of modern social change. The book identifies the core domains of political social work, including engaging individuals and communities in voting, influencing policy agendas, and seeking and holding elected office. Chapters elaborate on the necessary skills for political social work, featuring discussion, examples, and critical thinking exercises in such vital areas as:

Power, empowerment, and conflict: engaging effectively with power in political settings.
Getting on the agenda: assessing the political context and developing political strategy.
Planning the political intervention: advocacy and electoral campaigns.
Empowering voters
Persuasive political communication.
Budgeting and allocating resources.
Evaluating political social work efforts.
Making ethical decisions in political social work.

Political Social Work is a potent reference for social work professionals, practitioners, and students seeking core political knowledge and skills to practically advance their work. For specialists and generalists alike, it solidifies political action as vital for the evolution of the field.

This forward-thinking reference spotlights an expansive and inclusive community model for youth alcohol prevention as opposed to traditional individual and school-based group approaches. Focusing on a long-term intervention in a Southwestern border town, it documents the development of critical consciousness in an affected community, and emphasizes young people as crucial drivers of change in their environment. The book’s Community Readiness Model provides vital context for successful coalition building between youth, families, and community entities (e.g., schools, civic leaders, police) in reducing alcohol risk factors and promoting healthier choices. Given the severity and prevalence of youth alcohol use, this case study offers a viable blueprint for large-scale engagement in prevention.

Among the featured topics:

Integrating research into prevention strategies using participatory action research. Breaking down silos between community-based organizations: coalition development. Adult perspectives on nurturing youth leadership and coalition participation. Youth perspectives on youth power as the source of community development. Coalition as conclusion: tips on creating a functioning coalition. Community transformational resilience for adolescent alcohol prevention.

Youth-Community Partnerships for Adolescent Alcohol Prevention is both practical and inspiring reading for researchers and other mental health professionals in psychology, social work, and public health who work with adolescents, communities, and civic engagement.

Children are one of the most important phase of human development and the most important target group for social work intervention. Most of the schools of human development and social work round the world have an elective course on children and some offer a concentration in this area. There are plenty of textbooks on intervention with children published by Western authors, focusing on useful theories and skills but mainly at the remedial level. They neither use the preventative approach nor the child rights perspective, which has been found useful in the developing nations. The books on child rights are generally published by the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and other international organisations working in the field of children such as Save the Children. These books focus on the useful child rights perspective but they neither integrate theories nor use the preventative approach. The proposed book A Rights-based Preventative Approach for Children’s Psychosocial Well-Being: will be the first to apply the child rights perspective and the preventative approach to intervention for children's psychosocial well-being. It is an integration of theories with practice and teaching relevant in different parts of the world. The book is divided into the following three parts: Part 1: Introduction to a Rights-based Preventative Approach for Children’s Psychosocial Well-Being.- Part 2: Primary Prevention for Children's Psychosocial Well-Being.- Part 3: Secondary and Tertiary Prevention for Children's Psychosocial Well-Being
Fostering Accountability presents a model of child welfare decision making that holds public officials answerable for the integrity and validity of the actions they take on behalf of the children and families in their care. It operationalizes the concept of results-oriented accountability, which demands that administrators and practitioners show valid evidence of their success in improving child and family outcomes, not merely demonstrate mechanical procedural compliance. Drawing on the experiences of directors, staff, and evaluators, this timely and practical book describes the emergence of results-oriented accountability in child welfare with a special focus on the editors' role in establishing a university-agency research partnership under a federal consent decree. Chapters elaborate on the five successive stages of the results-oriented accountability framework-outcomes monitoring, data analysis, research review, evaluation, and quality improvement-and provide examples of applications of each stage for agency managers. By refocusing the emphasis on developing policies based on agency data, instead of purely reactive approaches that grasp at solutions and often fall short, Fostering Accountability guides administrators in monitoring outcomes, using evidence to select interventions to enhance results, and applying management strategies to evaluate and improve these efforts. The result is a pragmatic implementation guide for administrators seeking to bring safety, stability, continuity, permanence, and well-being to the lives of abused and neglected children in the United States.
The challenges of providing mental health services to school children are numerous and diverse, ranging from staffing shortages to insufficient funding to family resistance to administrative indifference. Yet with the U.S. Surgeon General estimating that approximately 20% of young people display signs of psychological problems, the need for such services – particularly for interventions that not only address mental health issues but also reinforce protective factors – is considerable.

Evidence-Based School Mental Health Services offers readers an innovative, best-practices approach to providing effective mental health services at school. The author draws on the widely used and effective three-tiered public health model to create a school-based system that addresses the emotional and behavioral needs of students most at risk for experiencing, or showing strong signs and symptoms of, emotional problems or disabilities. This prevention-oriented program adapts cognitive behavioral and other clinical therapies for use in primary through high school settings.

In several concise, easy-to-read chapters, the author addresses such important topics as:

The rationale for building a three-tier mental health system in schools.The importance of making emotion regulation training available to all students.Designing strategies for adding affect education and emotion regulation training at each tier.Providing empirical support for implementing CBT in school settings.Preparing young children to benefit from school-based CBT.

Also included is an Appendix of specific group activities and exercises that can be put to use in the school setting.

Evidence-Based School Mental Health Services is a must-have resource for researchers, scientist-practitioners, and graduate students in school psychology, clinical child psychology, pediatrics, psychiatry, social work, school counseling, education as well as for those who develop or influence public policy. And it is essential reading for any professional who is responsible for and interested in children’s well-being and development.

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