More related to economic policy

A Faltering American Dream is a jolting analysis of the current United States decline in government capabilities and solvency compared to other advanced nations of the world. It documents infrastructure deterioration, high national debt and poverty, scarcity of good jobs, and decreases in affordable higher education. The origin of these problems is in Washington where the harsh, uncompromising clash of political ideologies has resulted in a functionally disabled Congress.

In this book, the author collects a wide range of information to arrive at a unique perspective on the policy differences so bitterly contended in Congress: the size, functions, and business regulations of the federal government, and its tax support of traditional services. The author directly compares economic and employment results of contending party policies, since World War II when each party held the presidency. He demonstrates that government spending per person since the 1980s is increasing faster than inflation, population, and GDP growth. These increases have occurred through administrations of both parties and show little or no effect of ideological differences. He seeks answers for why is this happening.

In this lucid book, the author clarifies how and why such changes are happening to Americas economy and former world prominence. At the root of most of these problems, he identifies a fatal flaw in our governance structure, unanticipated by the framers of the constitution. This book concludes with an urgent call for a practical correction of this defect and a plea for the campaign rhetoric of the 2016 political candidates to express clearly the reasons why they advocate their policy positions on important economic issues.

Libertarian-conservative solutions to the political, social, economic and tax issues facing the United States from a 2012 Third Party Presidential contender, as well as one of America's leading Tea Party political leaders

In today's uncertain economy, people are growing more and more concerned about their financial future, and looking for common sense, limited government solutions. In The Conscience of a Libertarian: Empowering the Citizen Revolution with God, Guns, Gold & Tax Cuts, 2008 Libertarian Party Vice Presidential nominee Wayne Allyn Root presents a passionate case for smaller government; dramatically reduced spending and taxes; States' Rights; free markets; adherence to the Constitution; an end to the Fed; a ban of bailouts, stimulus, earmarks, pork and corporate welfare; economic and personal freedom; and a return of power to the people, just as the Founding Fathers intended. The book

Explains why Obama's big government solutions are leading to a Great Depression II and a coming Citizen Revolution Proposes a one year "Income Tax Vacation," a permanent end to capital gains taxes, and detailed spending freezes and cuts across all levels of government Proposes dramatic education reform centered on school choice, home-schooling, charter schools, teacher accountability, and parental freedom Proposes unique reforms in the areas of health care, energy and the public sector (government employee unions)

The Conscience of a Libertarian reveals how Americans can take back their country from big government, big unions, big corporations, corrupt politicians, bureaucrats, lawyers and lobbyists.

America is poised to lead the 21st Century, as it led the 20th. That will happen because the country is at a tipping point in the battle for its own renewal, a renewal that will allow America to be exceptional again.

Our economy is on the move, fueled by revolutions in energy, immigration, innovation, big data and advanced manufacturing. America's energy independence has set off shockwaves. Just as important are the social transformations that are making the country ever more racially and culturally diverse, younger, a home to immigrants, and the metropolitan centers that foster a rising economic and cultural dynamism. While most other countries struggle profoundly with immigration and religious and racial differences, America's on a path to multicultural identity.

Those revolutions in the economy, society and culture and are also producing a new American majority that embraces new values and new politics. Republicans are waging a counter-revolution and that is why America looks gridlocked and why the country is turning to Democrats to take on the country's growing challenges. The economic and social transformations leave people struggling to earn enough and reach the middle class. Families are under stress. Government is corrupted by big money.

The American public is demanding the country address the dark side of our progress - and reforms are starting to happen. That is why Democrats will get to lead an era of reform and renewal comparable to the progressive era that mitigated the excesses of the Industrial Revolution.

In this incisive book, expert strategist Greenberg draws on years of research and polling to illuminate how America is far from being gridlocked and he articulates a powerful vision of how American politics and America can be renewed.

America is currently involved in one of the worst economic crises of modern times. As alarm increases over how the government will balance the budget, handle the debt, and maintain prosperity for the future, the minutia of debts and deficits remains incomprehensible to many. Why is it so hard to find ways to resolve the fiscal crisis? This brief and intelligible book is a guide to understanding both the difficulties involved in managing the federal budget and why the on-going fiscal crisis is so significant for America’s future.

In order to introduce the reader to the basic composition of federal spending and to the ways that the government raises revenue, Hudson begins his guide with a "map" clarifying how to navigate the federal budget. He defines basic financial vocabulary and outlines concepts by using clear charts and diagrams that both provide basis for discussion and illustrate key points. With this budget map in mind, the second part of the book lays out how the partisan divide in America helps explain the fiscal crisis. Hudson analyzes the debate on the extent of the fiscal crisis, the ways that political parties have tried to solve it, and the political events and institutions that have surrounded the crisis.

This citizen’s guide reveals how differing views of America inform the arguments over deficits and debt. By the time readers finish the book, they will understand that the conflict over deficits and debt is not simply about where to cut or add spending, but instead is a struggle over national priorities and visions for the future.

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) projects that if current laws and policies remained the same, the federal government would run budget deficits of $368 billion in 2005 and $295 billion in 2006. However.those estimates omit a significant amount of spending that will occur this year-and conceivably for some time in the future-for U.S. military efforts in Iraq and Afghanistan and for other efforts in the war on terrorism.- Summary, The Budget and Economic Outlook: Fiscal Years 2006 to 2015The Budget and Economic Outlook presents topics related to leading economic issues including: .A review of 2004's budget outlook and the concept behind CBO's baseline projections.The importance of productivity growth for economic and budget projections as well as an overview of CBO's two-year forecast.Revenues by source and revenue projections in detail.An outlook of mandatory and discretionary spending, including net interest .Budget resolution targets vs. actual budget outcomesTHE U.S. BUDGET & ECONOMIC OUTLOOK: 2006-2015 is one of a series of reports on the state of the U.S. budget and economy that the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) issued each year. It is the requirement of Section 202(e) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 for the CBO to submit to the Committees on the Budget periodic reports about fiscal policy and to provide baseline projections of the federal budget. In accordance with the CBO's mandate to provide impartial analysis, the report makes no recommendations. For additional information about the Congressional Budget Office, please visit www.cbo.gov.
There are fundamental flaws in our political system and the policies, cost, and function of the federal government that seriously need to be corrected for this country to be the great country it once was for all those seeking the American dream. The American dream is different and personal for each individual, but the concept revolves around the ability for all people to be free to self-actualize their talents, abilities, and desires, not just for fame and fortune, but in order to live a happy and prosperous life. Thus, the American dream is about ensuring that we look out for the greater good in our policies and legislation that support opportunities for health, education, housing, research and development, innovation, jobs, and retirement. We have contracted with our government officials to carry this out. If they are not willing to act, then we must react by seeking out good candidates and voting for them. In a timely discussion, her book provides some common sense ideas on how to put the government back in the hands of the people who have had their lives turned upside down from loss of jobs, the mortgage crisis, high cost of education and healthcare, risky 401ks, and an insecurity in the future not seen since the Great Depression. She outlines how the nation got into such a mess and proposes a domestic plan to focus on the national priorities most Americans are concerned about. She outlines how to get Americans back to work, reduce the federal budget deficit, establish national priorities, make congress functional so it can do its job, make the federal government more effective and efficient, better educate our children, improve our infrastructure, and, as a result, hopefully reduce crime and create opportunity for our people.
The Global Great Depression and the Coming of World War II demonstrates the ways in which the economic crisis of the late 1920s and early 1930s helped to cause and shape the course of the Second World War. Historian John E. Moser points to the essential uniformity in the way in which the world s industrialized and industrializing nations responded to the challenge of the Depression. Among these nations, there was a move away from legislative deliberation and toward executive authority; away from free trade and toward the creation of regional trading blocs; away from the international gold standard and toward managed national currencies; away from chaotic individual liberty and toward rational regimentation; in other words, away from classical liberalism and toward some combination of corporatism, nationalism, and militarism.For all the similarities, however, there was still a great divide between two different general approaches to the economic crisis. Those countries that enjoyed easy, unchallenged access to resources and markets the United States, Great Britain, the Soviet Union, and France tended to turn inward, erecting tariff walls and promoting domestic recovery at the expense of the international order. On the other hand, those nations that lacked such access Germany and Japan sought to take the necessary resources and markets by force. The interplay of these powers, then, constituted the dynamic of international relations of the 1930s: have-nots attempting to achieve self-sufficiency through aggressive means, challenging haves that were too distrustful of one another, and too preoccupied with their own domestic affairs, to work cooperatively in an effort to stop them.
Accepting his party's presidential nomination in the summer of 2008, Barack Obama beamed while Denver's stadium rocked with gauzy chants from adoring admirers. But looming beyond the deafening roar was a harsh reality that too few were willing to face just yet: Some "hope" is too audacious to believe, and just because a smooth talker proclaims something, doesn't make it true.
Now, long after the honeymoon has ended and the national mood soured toward the 44th U.S. president, nationally syndicated radio talk-show host and columnist Kevin McCullough?the first pundit to predict Obama's rise to the presidency?provides an alarming perspective on the man he has watched closely since the aspiring commander-in-chief was an obscure community organizer on Chicago's South Side. You'll learn: How Barack Obama's first act as president to sign into law taxpayer-funded abortion How his administration has systematically and intentionally created federal dependents Why Obama's actions prove he believes American Exceptionalism is a myth The outrageous lengths the president is willing to go to as he undermines our national security From Obama's radical economic policy and dubious skills in national security to his administration's disdain for individual liberty and constitutional constraints on the power of the executive branch, McCullough lays out a convincing case for why, early on, he labeled Obama "one of the most dangerous politicians our generation will see." Real hope is possible. While delving into Obama's flawed governance, McCullough also charts a way out, and forward, for the America that once was and can be again. It is a way of clarity and common sense in a tried-and-true direction?a way that is diametrically opposed to the disappointing course set by the current resident of the Oval Office.


Having unilaterally opened its borders to international competition and foreign investment in the mid-1980s, Mexico has become one of the world's leading proponents of economic liberalization. Nevertheless, as the recent uprising of native peoples in Chiapas has made clear, economic reforms are not universally welcomed. This book addresses the challenges brought about by the restructuring of the Mexican economy at a time when-multiple organizations of civil society are demanding a democratic political transition in a system that has been dominated by one party for nearly seventy years. The contributors identify the key social and political actors—both domestic and international—involved in promoting or resisting the new economic model and examine the role of the state in the restructuring process. They explore such questions as: In what ways is the state itself being reconstituted to accommodate the demand for change? How have Canada and the United States responded to the increased internationalization of their economies? What are the challenges and prospects for transnational grassroots networks and labor solidarity? Answers are provided by scholars from anthropology, economics, history, political science, and sociology, all of whom promote interdisciplinary approaches to the issues. Each chapter traces the structural transformations within the central social relationships in Mexican society during the last decade or so and anticipates future consequences of today's changes.
Being the first casualty of the international financial crisis, Iceland was, in many ways, turned into a laboratory when it came to responding to one of the largest corporate failures on record.

This edited volume offers the most wide-ranging treatment of the Icelandic financial crisis and its political, economic, social, and constitutional consequences. Interdisciplinary, with contributions from historians, economists, sociologists, legal scholars, political scientists and philosophers, it also compares and contrasts the Icelandic experience with other national and global crises. It examines the economic magnitude of the crisis, the social and political responses, and the unique transitional justice mechanisms used to deal with it. It looks at backward-looking elements, including a societal and legal reckoning – which included the indictment of a Prime Minister and jailing of leading bankers for their part in the financial crisis – and forward-looking features, such as an attempt to rewrite the Icelandic constitution. Throughout, it underscores the contemporary relevance of the Icelandic case. While the Icelandic economic recovery has been much quicker than expected; it shows that public faith in political elites has not been restored.

This text will be of key interest to scholars, policy-makers and students of the financial crisis in such fields as European politics, international political economy, comparative politics, sociology, economics, contemporary history, and more broadly the social sciences and humanities.

Large or small, old EU member or new, and even EU member state or not – political economies across Southern Europe have been increasingly but distinctively ‘Europeanised’. In political, public and scholarly debates on processes of Europeanisation, Southern Europe invariably features as the area of concern. These concerns have been all the more heightened when the current sovereign debt crisis disproportionately hit this ‘flaky fringe’.

This volume systematically investigates the dynamics of Europeanisation in the ‘Southern Periphery’ by tracing the domestic constellations of ideas, interests and institutions over the course of the 2000s which came to a close with the crisis. Bringing together a multidisciplinary team of leading specialists, the volume focuses on the political economy of public policy reform in Greece, Italy, Malta, Portugal, Spain and Turkey. In order to allow for cross-case comparisons, these original country studies follow a common template framed by what the Editors call the ‘Europeanisation as research programme’. The volume casts empirical light on the causes of the crisis in these cases as well as the past legacies conditioning their responses to the crisis. Its conclusions point to variegated patterns of Europeanisation in different policy areas across Southern Europe.

This volume will be of interest to students and scholars of European integration, European political economy, European public policy and comparative politics as well as specialists of Southern Europe.

This book was published as a special issue of South European Society and Politics.

©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.