More related to nanostructure

Having successfully replaced elements used in traditional, pollution-prone, energy-consuming separation processes, nanoporous materials play an important role in chemical processing. Although their unique structural or surface physicochemical properties can, to an extent, be tailored to meet specific process-related requirements, the task of characterizing them completely is still a difficult and frequently controversial problem.

Nanoporous Materials: Advanced Techniques for Characterization, Modeling, and Processing outlines existing and expected innovations in the combination of characterization and modeling techniques used to distinguish, monitor, and control the evolution of properties in nanoporous sorbents, catalysts, and membranes during their synthesis and utilization in several important energy processes.

Providing broad coverage of the subject to make it useful for academic and industrial researchers from different disciplines and backgrounds, this book:

Presents the basic principles and major applications of key characterization techniques—from diffraction and spectroscopy to calorimetry and permeability

Explores computer simulation techniques, an indispensable complement to the combination of the aforementioned analytical techniques

Covers the fundamentals and the recent advances in sorption, membrane, and catalyst processes

Describes two characteristic case studies on emerging areas of application of porous solids in the fields of gas-to-liquid conversion and hydrogen storage

This reference takes a detailed approach to the subject, starting with basics, so that beginners or non-expert readers can learn and apply presented fundamentals and examples to their work. Organized into well-focused sections written by internationally known experts, this book includes case studies, end-of-chapter problems, and illustrative video presentations of basic principles.

Zeolites, with their crystalline microporous structures, are cordial hosts to a wide variety of guests. However, it was the abrupt and unexpected departure of one of these guests (water) from a host (stilbite) on heating which led Cronstedt, in 1756, to coin the term "zeolite" (from the Greek meaning "boiling stone") to describe this material. Since that time, approximately 40 different naturally-occurring zeolites have been discovered on earth. Recent studies of meteorite compositions have shown that these guest-host materials (e. g. , sodalite) occur in other parts of the universe as well. However, it wasn't until the twentieth century that synthetic routes to zeolites and other non-aluminosilicate molecular sieves were discovered. In addition, with the development of X-ray diffraction and the various spectroscopies, better understanding of the nature of the cavities, cages, and channels of these materials has led to the industrial exploitation of their guest-host properties. The world of zeolites has now expanded into a greater than 2 billion pound per year business, with major applications in detergent formulations, catalysis, and as adsorbents and desiccants. Their economic impact is difficult to determine; however, the improvement in gasoline yields alone (from catalytic cracking) must account for hundreds ofbillions ofdollars in increased GDP. In this volume, we have brought together a sampling of recent developments in various areas of guest-host or inclusion chemistry in zeolites.
Discover a new generation of organic nanomaterials and their applications

Recent developments in nanoscience and nanotechnology have given rise to a new generation of functional organic nanomaterials with controlled morphology and well-defined properties, which enable a broad range of useful applications. This book explores some of the most important of these organic nanomaterials, describing how they are synthesized and characterized. Moreover, the book explains how researchers have incorporated organic nanomaterials into devices for real-world applications.

Featuring contributions from an international team of leading nanoscientists, Organic Nanomaterials is divided into five parts:

Part One introduces the fundamentals of nanomaterials and self-assembled nanostructures Part Two examines carbon nanostructures—from fullerenes to carbon nanotubes to graphene—reporting on properties, theoretical studies, and applications Part Three investigates key aspects of some inorganic materials, self-assembled monolayers, organic field effect transistors, and molecular self-assembly at solid surfaces Part Four explores topics that involve both biological aspects and nanomaterials such as biofunctionalized surfaces Part Five offers detailed examples of how organic nanomaterials enhance sensors and molecular photovoltaics

Most of the chapters end with a summary highlighting the key points. References at the end of each chapter guide readers to the growing body of original research reports and reviews in the field.

Reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of organic nanomaterials, this book is recommended for researchers in chemistry, physics, materials science, polymer science, and chemical and materials engineering. All readers will learn the principles of synthesizing and characterizing new organic nanomaterials in order to support a broad range of exciting new applications.

Statistical correlation functions are a well-known class of statistical descriptors that can be used to describe the morphology and the microstructure-properties relationship. A comprehensive study has been performed for the use of these correlation functions for the reconstruction and homogenization in nano-composite materials. Correlation functions are measured from different techniques such as microscopy (SEM or TEM), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and can be generated through Monte Carlo simulations. In this book, different experimental techniques such as SAXS and image processing are presented, which are used to measure two-point correlation function correlation for multi-phase polymer composites.

Higher order correlation functions must be calculated or measured to increase the precision of the statistical continuum approach. To achieve this aim, a new approximation methodology is utilized to obtain N-point correlation functions for multiphase heterogeneous materials. The two-point functions measured by different techniques have been exploited to reconstruct the microstructure of heterogeneous media.

Statistical continuum theory is used to predict the effective thermal conductivity and elastic modulus of polymer composites. N-point probability functions as statistical descriptors of inclusions have been exploited to solve strong contrast homogenization for effective thermal conductivity and elastic modulus properties of heterogeneous materials. Finally, reconstructed microstructure is used to calculate effective properties and damage modeling of heterogeneous materials.

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