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In his monumental 1687 work, Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica, known familiarly as the Principia, Isaac Newton laid out in mathematical terms the principles of time, force, and motion that have guided the development of modern physical science. Even after more than three centuries and the revolutions of Einsteinian relativity and quantum mechanics, Newtonian physics continues to account for many of the phenomena of the observed world, and Newtonian celestial dynamics is used to determine the orbits of our space vehicles.

This authoritative, modern translation by I. Bernard Cohen and Anne Whitman, the first in more than 285 years, is based on the 1726 edition, the final revised version approved by Newton; it includes extracts from the earlier editions, corrects errors found in earlier versions, and replaces archaic English with contemporary prose and up-to-date mathematical forms.

Newton's principles describe acceleration, deceleration, and inertial movement; fluid dynamics; and the motions of the earth, moon, planets, and comets. A great work in itself, the Principia also revolutionized the methods of scientific investigation. It set forth the fundamental three laws of motion and the law of universal gravity, the physical principles that account for the Copernican system of the world as emended by Kepler, thus effectively ending controversy concerning the Copernican planetary system.
 
The translation-only edition of this preeminent work is truly accessible for today's scientists, scholars, and students.
This is the fifth edition of a well-established textbook. It is intended to provide a thorough coverage of the fundamental principles and techniques of classical mechanics, an old subject that is at the base of all of physics, but in which there has also in recent years been rapid development. The book is aimed at undergraduate students of physics and applied mathematics. It emphasizes the basic principles, and aims to progress rapidly to the point of being able to handle physically and mathematically interesting problems, without getting bogged down in excessive formalism. Lagrangian methods are introduced at a relatively early stage, to get students to appreciate their use in simple contexts. Later chapters use Lagrangian and Hamiltonian methods extensively, but in a way that aims to be accessible to undergraduates, while including modern developments at the appropriate level of detail. The subject has been developed considerably recently while retaining a truly central role for all students of physics and applied mathematics.

This edition retains all the main features of the fourth edition, including the two chapters on geometry of dynamical systems and on order and chaos, and the new appendices on conics and on dynamical systems near a critical point. The material has been somewhat expanded, in particular to contrast continuous and discrete behaviours. A further appendix has been added on routes to chaos (period-doubling) and related discrete maps. The new edition has also been revised to give more emphasis to specific examples worked out in detail.

Classical Mechanics is written for undergraduate students of physics or applied mathematics. It assumes some basic prior knowledge of the fundamental concepts and reasonable familiarity with elementary differential and integral calculus.

Contents: Linear MotionEnergy and Angular MomentumCentral Conservative ForcesRotating FramesPotential TheoryThe Two-Body ProblemMany-Body SystemsRigid BodiesLagrangian MechanicsSmall Oscillations and Normal ModesHamiltonian MechanicsDynamical Systems and Their GeometryOrder and Chaos in Hamiltonian SystemsAppendices:VectorsConicsPhase Plane Analysis Near Critical PointsDiscrete Dynamical Systems — Maps
Readership: Undergraduates in physics and applied mathematics.
A look inside the world of “quants” and how science can (and can’t) predict financial markets: “Entertaining and enlightening” (The New York Times).
 
After the economic meltdown of 2008, Warren Buffett famously warned, “beware of geeks bearing formulas.” But while many of the mathematicians and software engineers on Wall Street failed when their abstractions turned ugly in practice, a special breed of physicists has a much deeper history of revolutionizing finance. Taking us from fin-de-siècle Paris to Rat Pack–era Las Vegas, from wartime government labs to Yippie communes on the Pacific coast, James Owen Weatherall shows how physicists successfully brought their science to bear on some of the thorniest problems in economics, from options pricing to bubbles.
 
The crisis was partly a failure of mathematical modeling. But even more, it was a failure of some very sophisticated financial institutions to think like physicists. Models—whether in science or finance—have limitations; they break down under certain conditions. And in 2008, sophisticated models fell into the hands of people who didn’t understand their purpose, and didn’t care. It was a catastrophic misuse of science. The solution, however, is not to give up on models; it’s to make them better.
 
This book reveals the people and ideas on the cusp of a new era in finance, from a geophysicist using a model designed for earthquakes to predict a massive stock market crash to a physicist-run hedge fund earning 2,478.6% over the course of the 1990s. Weatherall shows how an obscure idea from quantum theory might soon be used to create a far more accurate Consumer Price Index. The Physics of Wall Street will change how we think about our economic future.
 
“Fascinating history . . . Happily, the author has a gift for making complex concepts clear to lay readers.” —Booklist
A New York Times Best Seller!

Here is a book to lead you through the fascinating intersections of life and physics with humor and intelligence.

Find out how the laws of physics define every aspect of our lives and society, from human nature and relationships to geopolitical issues like financial markets, globalization and immigration. The Quantum Rules is a different kind of physics book, as easy to read as a novel and directly relevant for everyday life issues that affect us all. It is not meant to dazzle you with unproven speculations that have no bearing on your life. Rather, The Quantum Rules will familiarize you with the important and established laws at the heart of physics, in a way never done before – by showing how the defining patterns of our lives, our behavior and our society already follow similar rules.

Never took an interest in science before? No problem! you will still understand everything and find plenty to relate to. A scientist or a science junkie? You will find a different perspective on things you may already know. Best of all, you will discover how to have meaningful conversations about physics in a way that won’t make eyes glaze over, and in which all can gladly participate.

The Quantum Rules also does something you would never expect from a book on physics – it makes you laugh, often. Its new and original take on established natural laws injects plenty of dry humor into this serious subject, by using life to explain physics and in turn using physics to understand life.
The worlds of Wall Street and The City have always held a certain allure, but in recent years have left an indelible mark on the wider public consciousness and there has been a need to become more financially literate. The quantitative nature of complex financial transactions makes them a fascinating subject area for mathematicians of all types, whether for general interest or because of the enormous monetary rewards on offer. An Introduction to Quantitative Finance concerns financial derivatives - a derivative being a contract between two entities whose value derives from the price of an underlying financial asset - and the probabilistic tools that were developed to analyse them. The theory in the text is motivated by a desire to provide a suitably rigorous yet accessible foundation to tackle problems the author encountered whilst trading derivatives on Wall Street. The book combines an unusual blend of real-world derivatives trading experience and rigorous academic background. Probability provides the key tools for analysing and valuing derivatives. The price of a derivative is closely linked to the expected value of its pay-out, and suitably scaled derivative prices are martingales, fundamentally important objects in probability theory. The prerequisite for mastering the material is an introductory undergraduate course in probability. The book is otherwise self-contained and in particular requires no additional preparation or exposure to finance. It is suitable for a one-semester course, quickly exposing readers to powerful theory and substantive problems. The book may also appeal to students who have enjoyed probability and have a desire to see how it can be applied. Signposts are given throughout the text to more advanced topics and to different approaches for those looking to take the subject further.
Understanding tensors is essential for any physics student dealing with phenomena where causes and effects have different directions. A horizontal electric field producing vertical polarization in dielectrics; an unbalanced car wheel wobbling in the vertical plane while spinning about a horizontal axis; an electrostatic field on Earth observed to be a magnetic field by orbiting astronauts—these are some situations where physicists employ tensors. But the true beauty of tensors lies in this fact: When coordinates are transformed from one system to another, tensors change according to the same rules as the coordinates. Tensors, therefore, allow for the convenience of coordinates while also transcending them. This makes tensors the gold standard for expressing physical relationships in physics and geometry.

Undergraduate physics majors are typically introduced to tensors in special-case applications. For example, in a classical mechanics course, they meet the "inertia tensor," and in electricity and magnetism, they encounter the "polarization tensor." However, this piecemeal approach can set students up for misconceptions when they have to learn about tensors in more advanced physics and mathematics studies (e.g., while enrolled in a graduate-level general relativity course or when studying non-Euclidean geometries in a higher mathematics class).

Dwight E. Neuenschwander's Tensor Calculus for Physics is a bottom-up approach that emphasizes motivations before providing definitions. Using a clear, step-by-step approach, the book strives to embed the logic of tensors in contexts that demonstrate why that logic is worth pursuing. It is an ideal companion for courses such as mathematical methods of physics, classical mechanics, electricity and magnetism, and relativity.

"Introduction to Quantum Computation" is an introduction to a new rapidly developing theory of quantum computing. The book is a comprehensive introduction to the main ideas and techniques of quantum computation. It begins with the basics of classical theory of computation: NP-complete problems, Boolean circuits, Finite state machine, Turing machine and the idea of complexity of an algorithm. The general quantum formalism (pure states, qubit, superposition, evolution of quantum system, entanglement, multi-qubit system ...) and complex algorithm examples are also presented. Matlab is a well known in engineer academia as matrix computing environment, which makes it well suited for simulating quantum algorithms. The (Quantum Computer Toolbox) QCT is written entirely in the Matlab and m-files are listed in book's sections. There are certain data types that are implicitly defined by the QCT, including data types for qubit registers and transformations. The QCT contains many functions designed to mimic the actions of a quantum computer. In addition, the QCT contains several convenience functions designed to aid in the creation and modification of the data types used in algorithms. The main purposes of the QCT are for research involving Quantum Computation and as a teaching tool to aid in learning about Quantum Computing systems. The readers will learn to implement complex quantum algorithm (quantum teleportation and Deutsch, Grover, Shor algorithm) under Matlab environment (complete Matlab code examples).
What sets this volume apart from other mathematics texts is its emphasis on mathematical tools commonly used by scientists and engineers to solve real-world problems. Using a unique approach, it covers intermediate and advanced material in a manner appropriate for undergraduate students. Based on author Bruce Kusse's course at the Department of Applied and Engineering Physics at Cornell University, Mathematical Physics begins with essentials such as vector and tensor algebra, curvilinear coordinate systems, complex variables, Fourier series, Fourier and Laplace transforms, differential and integral equations, and solutions to Laplace's equations. The book moves on to explain complex topics that often fall through the cracks in undergraduate programs, including the Dirac delta-function, multivalued complex functions using branch cuts, branch points and Riemann sheets, contravariant and covariant tensors, and an introduction to group theory. This expanded second edition contains a new appendix on the calculus of variation -- a valuable addition to the already superb collection of topics on offer.
This is an ideal text for upper-level undergraduates in physics, applied physics, physical chemistry, biophysics, and all areas of engineering. It allows physics professors to prepare students for a wide range of employment in science and engineering and makes an excellent reference for scientists and engineers in industry. Worked out examples appear throughout the book and exercises follow every chapter. Solutions to the odd-numbered exercises are available for lecturers at www.wiley-vch.de/textbooks/.
What does quilting have to do with electric circuit theory? The answer is just one of the fascinating ways that best-selling popular math writer Paul Nahin illustrates the deep interplay of math and physics in the world around us in his latest book of challenging mathematical puzzles, Mrs. Perkins's Electric Quilt. With his trademark combination of intriguing mathematical problems and the historical anecdotes surrounding them, Nahin invites readers on an exciting and informative exploration of some of the many ways math and physics combine to create something vastly more powerful, useful, and interesting than either is by itself.

In a series of brief and largely self-contained chapters, Nahin discusses a wide range of topics in which math and physics are mutually dependent and mutually illuminating, from Newtonian gravity and Newton's laws of mechanics to ballistics, air drag, and electricity. The mathematical subjects range from algebra, trigonometry, geometry, and calculus to differential equations, Fourier series, and theoretical and Monte Carlo probability. Each chapter includes problems--some three dozen in all--that challenge readers to try their hand at applying what they have learned. Just as in his other books of mathematical puzzles, Nahin discusses the historical background of each problem, gives many examples, includes MATLAB codes, and provides complete and detailed solutions at the end.



Mrs. Perkins's Electric Quilt will appeal to students interested in new math and physics applications, teachers looking for unusual examples to use in class--and anyone who enjoys popular math books.

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