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Finalist for the Dayton Literary Peace Prize • “In all of the literature addressing education, race, poverty, and criminal justice, there has been nothing quite like Reading with Patrick.”—The Atlantic

A memoir of the life-changing friendship between an idealistic young teacher and her gifted student, jailed for murder in the Mississippi Delta

Recently graduated from Harvard University, Michelle Kuo arrived in the rural town of Helena, Arkansas, as a Teach for America volunteer, bursting with optimism and drive. But she soon encountered the jarring realities of life in one of the poorest counties in America, still disabled by the legacy of slavery and Jim Crow. In this stirring memoir, Kuo, the child of Taiwanese immigrants, shares the story of her complicated but rewarding mentorship of one student, Patrick Browning, and his remarkable literary and personal awakening.

Convinced she can make a difference in the lives of her teenaged students, Michelle Kuo puts her heart into her work, using quiet reading time and guided writing to foster a sense of self in students left behind by a broken school system. Though Michelle loses some students to truancy and even gun violence, she is inspired by some such as Patrick. Fifteen and in the eighth grade, Patrick begins to thrive under Michelle’s exacting attention. However, after two years of teaching, Michelle feels pressure from her parents and the draw of opportunities outside the Delta and leaves Arkansas to attend law school.

Then, on the eve of her law-school graduation, Michelle learns that Patrick has been jailed for murder. Feeling that she left the Delta prematurely and determined to fix her mistake, Michelle returns to Helena and resumes Patrick’s education—even as he sits in a jail cell awaiting trial. Every day for the next seven months they pore over classic novels, poems, and works of history. Little by little, Patrick grows into a confident, expressive writer and a dedicated reader galvanized by the works of Frederick Douglass, James Baldwin, Walt Whitman, W. S. Merwin, and others. In her time reading with Patrick, Michelle is herself transformed, contending with the legacy of racism and the questions of what constitutes a “good” life and what the privileged owe to those with bleaker prospects.

“A powerful meditation on how one person can affect the life of another . . . One of the great strengths of Reading with Patrick is its portrayal of the risk inherent to teaching.”—The Seattle Times

“[A] tender memoir.”—O: The Oprah Magazine
In a smart, entertaining, reassuring book that reads like fiction, Alexandra Robbins manages to cross Gossip Girl with Freaks and Geeks and explain the fascinating psychology and science behind popularity and outcasthood. She reveals that the things that set students apart in high school are the things that help them stand out later in life.

Robbins follows seven real people grappling with the uncertainties of high school social life, including:
The Loner, who has withdrawn from classmates since they persuaded her to unwittingly join her own hate club The Popular Bitch, a cheerleading captain both seduced by and trapped within her clique's perceived prestige The Nerd, whose differences cause students to laugh at him and his mother to needle him for not being "normal" The New Girl, determined to stay positive as classmates harass her for her mannerisms and target her because of her race The Gamer, an underachiever in danger of not graduating, despite his intellect and his yearning to connect with other students The Weird Girl, who battles discrimination and gossipy politics in school but leads a joyous life outside of it The Band Geek, who is alternately branded too serious and too emo, yet annually runs for class presidentIn the middle of the year, Robbins surprises her subjects with a secret challenge--experiments that force them to change how classmates see them.

Robbins intertwines these narratives--often triumphant, occasionally heartbreaking, and always captivating--with essays exploring subjects like the secrets of popularity, being excluded doesn't mean there's anything wrong with you, why outsiders succeed, how schools make the social scene worse--and how to fix it.

The Geeks Shall Inherit the Earth is not just essential reading for students, teachers, parents, and anyone who deals with teenagers, but for all of us, because at some point in our lives we've all been on the outside looking in.
'This is a stimulating and well-researched book that will interest anyone who cares about how our schools should evolve' - Matters Arising

'What are schools for? What happens when school walls come tumbling down, and school and community become inextricably linked, offering a range of extended provision to young people and opportunities for lifelong learning to adults? How would you lead such a school? David Middlewood and Richard Parker draw upon their personal and researched experience, to explore school leadership within a community which has an extended school at its heart. This is an engaging and purposeful book for researchers and practitioners alike' - Professor Ann Briggs, Newcastle University, Chair of BELMAS

This book shows leaders of all types of schools how to become effective in extended schooling and fulfil 'Every Child Matters' (ECM) requirements, by building on and adapting their current practices. The authors explain the context of Extended Schools, in the UK and elsewhere, and outline the features of effectiveness in schools and their leaders.

The authors provide practical advice using case studies from a range of settings which show what can be achieved across a wide variety of contexts. 'Points to consider' give advice to readers at all levels, covering staffing and resourcing, as well as the creation and development of successful partnerships in the community.

This book is an essential resource for leaders beginning in extended schools, and leaders already working in extended schools across nursery, primary and secondary settings. It is also relevant to governors, inspectors and advisers and leaders studying masters and doctorate courses in Leadership and Education Policy.

From the award-winning author of Soldier Girls and Just Like Us, an “extraordinary” (The Denver Post) account of refugee teenagers at a Denver public high school and their compassionate teacher and “a reminder that in an era of nativism, some Americans are still breaking down walls and nurturing the seeds of the great American experiment” (The New York Times Book Review).

The Newcomers follows the lives of twenty-two immigrant teenagers throughout the course of the 2015-2016 school year as they land at South High School in Denver, Colorado. These newcomers, from fourteen to nineteen years old, come from nations convulsed by drought or famine or war. Many come directly from refugee camps, after experiencing dire forms of cataclysm. Some arrive alone, having left or lost every other member of their original family.

At the center of their story is Mr. Williams, their dedicated and endlessly resourceful teacher of English Language Acquisition. If Mr. Williams does his job right, the newcomers will leave his class at the end of the school year with basic English skills and new confidence, their foundation for becoming Americans and finding a place in their new home. Ultimately, “The Newcomers reads more like an anthropologist’s notebook than a work of reportage: Helen Thorpe not only observes, she chips in her two cents and participates. Like her, we’re moved and agitated by this story of refugee teenagers…Donald Trump’s gross slander of refugees and immigrants is countered on every page by the evidence of these students’ lives and characters” (Los Angeles Review of Books).

With the US at a political crossroads around questions of immigration, multiculturalism, and America’s role on the global stage, Thorpe presents a fresh and nuanced perspective. The Newcomers is “not only an intimate look at lives immigrant teens live, but it is a primer on the art and science of new language acquisition and a portrait of ongoing and emerging global horrors and the human fallout that arrives on our shores” (USA TODAY).
A Positive Approach To Raising Happy, Healthy and Mature Teenagers
 
Adolescence can be a time of great stress and turmoil—not only for kids going through it, but for their parents as well. It’s normal for teens to explore a new sense of freedom and to redefine the ways in which they relate to their parents, and that process can sometimes leave parents feeling powerless, alienated, or excluded from their children’s lives. These effects can be magnified even further in this modern age of social networks, cell phones, and constant digital distraction.

This newly revised and updated edition of Positive Discipline for Teenagers shows parents how to build stronger bridges of communication with their children, break the destructive cycles of guilt and blame that occur in parent-teen power struggles, and work toward greater mutual respect with their adolescents. At the core of the Positive Discipline approach is the understanding that teens still need their parents, just in different ways—and by better understanding who their teens really are, parents can learn to encourage both their teens and themselves, and instill good judgment without being judgmental. The methods in this book work to build vital social and life skills through encouragement and empowerment—not punishment. Truly effective parenting is about connection before correction.

Over the years, millions of parents have come to trust Jane Nelsen’s classic Positive Discipline series for its consistent, commonsense approach to raising happy, responsible kids. This new edition is filled with proven, effective methods for coping with such parenting challenges as:
 
-Fostering truly honest discussions with your teen
-Helping your teen handle the online world 
-Turning mistakes into opportunities
-Keeping your sanity while raising your teen—and making sure your own teenage issues aren’t weighing you down
-Teaching your teen how to pursue the goal that make them happy…and a few that make you happy too (like chores)
-Making sure you’re on your teen’s side, and that they know that
-Avoiding the pitfalls of excessive control and excessive permissiveness
In 1949, a small book had a big impact on education. In just over one hundred pages, Ralph W. Tyler presented the concept that curriculum should be dynamic, a program under constant evaluation and revision. Curriculum had always been thought of as a static, set program, and in an era preoccupied with student testing, he offered the innovative idea that teachers and administrators should spend as much time evaluating their plans as they do assessing their students.

Since then, Basic Principles of Curriculum and Instruction has been a standard reference for anyone working with curriculum development. Although not a strict how-to guide, the book shows how educators can critically approach curriculum planning, studying progress and retooling when needed. Its four sections focus on setting objectives, selecting learning experiences, organizing instruction, and evaluating progress. Readers will come away with a firm understanding of how to formulate educational objectives and how to analyze and adjust their plans so that students meet the objectives. Tyler also explains that curriculum planning is a continuous, cyclical process, an instrument of education that needs to be fine-tuned.
This emphasis on thoughtful evaluation has kept Basic Principles of Curriculum and Instruction a relevant, trusted companion for over sixty years. And with school districts across the nation working feverishly to align their curriculum with Common Core standards, Tyler's straightforward recommendations are sound and effective tools for educators working to create a curriculum that integrates national objectives with their students' needs.
At fifteen, Victor Rios found himself a human target—flat on his ass amid a hail of shotgun fire, desperate for money and a place on the street. Faced with the choice of escalating a drug turf war or eking out a living elsewhere, he turned to a teacher, who mentored him and helped him find a job at an auto shop. That job would alter the course of his whole life—putting him on the road to college and eventually a PhD. Now, Rios is a rising star, hailed for his work studying the lives of African American and Latino youth.

In Human Targets, Rios takes us to the streets of California, where we encounter young men who find themselves in much the same situation as fifteen-year-old Victor. We follow young gang members into schools, homes, community organizations, and detention facilities, watch them interact with police, grow up to become fathers, get jobs, get rap sheets—and in some cases get killed. What is it that sets apart young people like Rios who succeed and survive from the ones who don’t? Rios makes a powerful case that the traditional good kid/bad kid, street kid/decent kid dichotomy is much too simplistic, arguing instead that authorities and institutions help create these identities—and that they can play an instrumental role in providing young people with the resources for shifting between roles. In Rios’s account, to be a poor Latino youth is to be a human target—victimized and considered an enemy by others, viewed as a threat to law enforcement and schools, and burdened by stigma, disrepute, and punishment. That has to change.

This is not another sensationalistic account of gang bangers. Instead, the book is a powerful look at how authority figures succeed—and fail—at seeing the multi-faceted identities of at-risk youths, youths who succeed—and fail—at demonstrating to the system that they are ready to change their lives. In our post-Ferguson era, Human Targets is essential reading.
'Improving the quality of learning and teaching is the most important thing that school leaders do. This book contains much that will help the reader in that enterprise. It reflects the fact that much of what we know about effective, high-quality schools is already 'out there' in schools across the country. The book mines that gold. It is full of good sense, a treasure chest of helpful ideas which have the credibility of being grounded in case-study material, and in the experience of the authors, two of whom are practising headteachers. The book sets out the principles underpinning the Learning School, but offers also a strong pragmatic focus and is organized so that it can be dipped into and something worthwhile easily found. It sets out practical and specific steps to creating the Learning School and will support change and improvement in the professional practices involved in making a school a stimulating learning environment for adults as well as students' - Dr Martin J Coles, Assistant Director, National College for School Leadership

'[C]learly set out, passionately and well-written, covering much material, full of interesting insights, as one might expect from two head teachers and an acknowledged expert in the field... Lots of interesting thoughts and ideas, written in an accessible style. I would certainly recommend this book to my students' - ESCalate

The schools of the 21st century cannot continue to apply the techniques of the 20th century. 'New Learning' dispenses with outdated preoccupations with tests, targets, and leadership from above, and focuses on independence of learning and structural flexibility within schools.

The authors give a complete overview of how schools can adapt to meet changing needs. They look at the teacher as learner, learning outside the classroom, and the nature of leadership in learning schools, and provide practical solutions to the problems of staffing, resourcing and assessment.

This book is an invaluable resource for all mid-to-upper level managers in schools, anyone aspiring to these positions, or anyone who takes a longterm view of the future of educational practice.

`Practitioner Research in Education should become a millennium "must" for principals and school leaders whose schools are under OfSTED spotlight and for all those practitioners who earnestly aim to undertake higher managment studies whilst "in situ" in their teaching posts.... It is a publication well worth reading by all those who continue to be, justifiably, enthused by school development issues' - Angela Monkman Brushett, OfSTED Inspector

`This is a very simple but notable piece of work... They have done a service to education in providing evidence (and there is remarkably little elsewhere) that continuous professional development does pay off in terms of a better education for pupils in schools' - School Leadership and Management

Much debate currently concerns the value of education research : how is it perceived by practitioners and students ? How useful and relevant is it ? Who best carries it out ? Can it be free from political influence ? While practitioner research is widely advocated, little is known about its effect on individuals, teams and the institution.

In Practitioner Research in Education, the authors explore the effects of teachers' and lecturers' research and its impact on organizational improvement. Whether affecting whole school cultures through teachers' group work, or influencing practice through an individual's research, the accounts in this book show how research can make a difference. They show how improvements in management and leadership arising from practitioner research can contribute to advances in teaching and learning.

The book includes material on how to conduct research, the types of research which practitioners can carry out in a school or college, and the implications of research for organizational development. Readers will be able to draw valuable lessons for personal, professional, team or school improvement.

Practitioner Research In Education will be useful to students and practitioners of educational management, to those doing research in educational settings, and to school managers who are committed to school improvement.

Science, engineering, and technology permeate nearly every facet of modern life and hold the key to solving many of humanity's most pressing current and future challenges. The United States' position in the global economy is declining, in part because U.S. workers lack fundamental knowledge in these fields. To address the critical issues of U.S. competitiveness and to better prepare the workforce, A Framework for K-12 Science Education proposes a new approach to K-12 science education that will capture students' interest and provide them with the necessary foundational knowledge in the field.

A Framework for K-12 Science Education outlines a broad set of expectations for students in science and engineering in grades K-12. These expectations will inform the development of new standards for K-12 science education and, subsequently, revisions to curriculum, instruction, assessment, and professional development for educators. This book identifies three dimensions that convey the core ideas and practices around which science and engineering education in these grades should be built. These three dimensions are: crosscutting concepts that unify the study of science through their common application across science and engineering; scientific and engineering practices; and disciplinary core ideas in the physical sciences, life sciences, and earth and space sciences and for engineering, technology, and the applications of science. The overarching goal is for all high school graduates to have sufficient knowledge of science and engineering to engage in public discussions on science-related issues, be careful consumers of scientific and technical information, and enter the careers of their choice.

A Framework for K-12 Science Education is the first step in a process that can inform state-level decisions and achieve a research-grounded basis for improving science instruction and learning across the country. The book will guide standards developers, teachers, curriculum designers, assessment developers, state and district science administrators, and educators who teach science in informal environments.
In Rethinking Racism: Emotion, Persuasion, and Literacy Education in an All-White High School, Jennifer Seibel Trainor proposes a new understanding of the roots of racism, one that is based on attention to the role of emotion and the dynamics of persuasion. This one-year ethnographic study argues against previous assumptions about racism, demonstrating instead how rhetoric and emotion, as well as the processes and culture of schools, are involved in the formation of racist beliefs.

Telling the story of a year spent in an all-white high school, Trainor suggests that contrary to prevailing opinion, racism often does not stem from ignorance, a lack of exposure to other cultures, or the desire to protect white privilege. Rather, the causes of racism are frequently found in the realms of emotion and language, as opposed to rational calculations of privilege or political ideologies. Trainor maintains that racist assertions often originate not from prejudiced attitudes or beliefs but from metaphorical connections between racist ideas and nonracist values. These values are reinforced, even promoted by schooling via "emotioned rules" in place in classrooms: in tacit, unexamined lessons, rituals, and practices that exert a powerful—though largely unacknowledged—persuasive force on student feelings and beliefs about race.

Through in-depth analysis of established anti-racist pedagogies, student behavior, and racial discourses, Trainor illustrates the manner in which racist ideas are subtly upheld through social and literacy education in the classroom—and are thus embedded in the infrastructures of schools themselves. It is the emotional and rhetorical framework of the classroom that lends racism its compelling power in the minds of students, even as teachers endeavor to address the issue of cultural discrimination. This effort is continually hindered by an incomplete understanding of the function of emotions in relation to antiracist persuasion and cannot be remedied until the root of the problem is addressed.

Rethinking Racism calls for a fresh approach to understanding racism and its causes, offering crucial insight into the formative role of schooling in the perpetuation of discriminatory beliefs. In addition, this highly readable narrative draws from white students' own stories about the meanings of race in their learning and their lives. It thus provides new ways of thinking about how researchers and teachers rep- resent whiteness. Blending narrative with more traditional forms of ethnographic analysis, Rethinking Racism uncovers the ways in which constructions of racism originate in literacy research and in our classrooms—and how these constructions themselves can limit the rhetorical positions students enact.

Stories abound about the lengths to which middle- and upper-middle-class parents will go to ensure a spot for their child at a prestigious university. From the Suzuki method to calculus-based physics, from AP tests all the way back to early-learning Kumon courses, students are increasingly pushed to excel with that Harvard or Yale acceptance letter held tantalizingly in front of them. And nowhere is this drive more apparent than in our elite secondary schools. In Class Warfare, Lois Weis, Kristin Cipollone, and Heather Jenkins go inside the ivy-yearning halls of three such schools to offer a day-to-day, week-by-week look at this remarkable drive toward college admissions and one of its most salient purposes: to determine class.

Drawing on deep and sustained contact with students, parents, teachers, and administrators at three iconic secondary schools in the United States, the authors unveil a formidable process of class positioning at the heart of the college admissions process. They detail the ways students and parents exploit every opportunity and employ every bit of cultural, social, and economic capital they can in order to gain admission into a “Most Competitive” or “Highly Competitive Plus” university. Moreover, they show how admissions into these schools—with their attendant rankings—are used to lock in or improve class standing for the next generation. It’s a story of class warfare within a given class, the substrata of which—whether economically, racially, or socially determined—are fiercely negotiated through the college admissions process.
In a historic moment marked by deep economic uncertainty, anxieties over socioeconomic standing are at their highest. Class, as this book shows, must be won, and the collateral damage of this aggressive pursuit may just be education itself, flattened into a mere victory banner.
Backed by solid research, Writing Instruction That Works answers the following question: What is writing instruction today and what can it be tomorrow? This up-to-date, comprehensive book identifies areas of concern for the ways that writing is being taught in today’s secondary schools. The authors offer far-reaching direction for improving writing instruction that assist both student literacy and subject learning. They provide many examples of successful writing practices in each of the four core academic subjects (English, mathematics, science, and social studies/history), along with guidance for meeting the Common Core standards. The text also includes sections on “Technology and the Teaching of Writing” and “English Language Learners.”

Book Features:

A detailed presentation of successful writing instruction in all four core subject areas.Examples of writing activities that comply with the Common Core Standards.A checklist and discussion questions for the classroom and professional development.

Arthur N. Applebee is a Distinguished Professor in the School of Education, University at Albany, State University of New York and Director of the Center on English Learning and Achievement. Judith A. Langer is the Vincent O’Leary Distinguished Professor at the University at Albany and the author of Envisioning Literature, now in its Second Edition, and Envisioning Knowledge.

“Concerned about your students' writing skills? Worried about how to prepare them for new performance assessments? In search of ideas for re-conceiving the teaching of writing on your campus? You have come to the right place. Writing Instruction that Works details and analyzes the state of writing in America's schools and offers a vision for how writing could and should be taught. For me, ArthurApplebeeand Judith Langer's book is a call to action. Read it today. Buy a copy for every educator you know.”
—Carol Jago, past president, National Council of Teachers of English, associate director, California Reading and Literature Project, UCLA

“In Writing Instruction that Works, Arthur Applebee and Judith Langer do as they have always done: offer us a compelling, coherent, and much-needed vision of what effective middle and high school writing instruction looks like in all content areas, anchoring their insights, recommendations, and claims in their extensive research in the classrooms of real teachers throughout the country. This book serves as a guide for what we must do to teach writing well and how we can do that in our schools, departments, and individual classrooms despite the many challenges we face. It is a book that traces our progress, identifies our problems, reminds us what is possible while revealing the ways we might achieve these ambitious and very important goals. If I had to recommend one book to a teacher, administrator, or professor to read about improving the teaching of writing in all content areas, this would be that book.”
—Jim Burke, bestselling author of The English Teacher’s Companion and What’s the Big Idea?

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