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Step-by-step instructions for 25 projects you’ll be amazed were made from pin loom weavings!

Pin looms are hot! These palm-sized weaving looms go anywhere and make just about anything you can imagine, from fashionable wrist cuffs to full-sized blankets. Just drop a pin loom in your project bag with a ball of yarn and you are on your way to fast, fun weaving.

Margaret Stump, author of the original Pin Loom Weaving, has outdone herself with the 25 designs in this new book. There are elegant wraps, a fun fox bag, an American flag blanket, pillows, pins, stylish scarves, and more--all in a modern style that says "hand crafted with pride."

With beginning weavers in mind, Margaret first walks you through how to weave on a 2" and 4" loom. Once you know how to make a basic square and connect your pieces, you are well on your way to making any of the projects in this book. The book divides projects into those that use a 2", 4", adjustable fine-gauge, and even a pot holder loom, and those that combine pieces from different looms, so it is easy to find a project and get started.

Pin looms are readily available in a variety of sizes and materials. Choose a favorite pattern and a suitable pin loom, and start weaving anywhere and everywhere today!

• All the basics of pin loom weaving and more than 30 beginning and medium level projects you can make on the go
• Simple weaving techniques for portable looms
• Instructions for making your own simple 2" loom
• Projects for standard 2" and 4" looms, as well as weaving on potholder looms and knitting looms
The author spent four summers (1930–33) living and working among the Navajo, during which time she learned the principles of weaving. In this book she takes readers through the same process, introducing the careful details, the personalities she encountered, and the materials and methods of weaving in the Navajo style.
The spinning of the yarn, the dyes, the equipment, the weaving processes, the designs and colors, even the tensions and textures of the final product are all part of weaving a Navajo blanket. The author guides readers through each step, from choosing the wool through carding and spinning warp and weft yarns, building and setting up a loom, creating a design, and carrying out the actual weaving. Although the emphasis is on typical blanket weaving, the author also covers the related arts of saddleblanket weaving, warp weaving, scalloped edge weaving, double-faced weaving, and sandpainting tapestries. She also comments on history, patterns, symbolism, the effect of the market, and other matters that affect the Navajo weaving style. In five appendixes she reviews the implements and materials of weaving, Navajo materials for natural dyes, weaving terms, and simple lessons in learning to weave a Navajo blanket. Nearly 100 photographs and line drawings illustrate the processes and finished work.
Crafters, whether they want to start from scratch or gradually add Navajo elements to their other weaving skills, will learn from this book the authentic steps of Navajo weaving. Collectors, ethnologists, and others will learn more about materials, techniques, and related matters that will help them in judging, appraising, and enjoying the processes that go into weaving a Navajo blanket.

The ancient craft of spinning is becoming increasingly popular with today's modern craft enthusiasts as it provides a method of creating unique, personal and unusual yarns that can be used in contemporary weaving, knitting, crocheting, needlepoint, embroidery and macramé. It is a highly creative craft, yet simple to learn, and therein lies both its fascination and challenge. The story of spinning is interwoven with the history of man. The first attempt at spinning probably consisted of twisting animal fibers with suitable plant material. Some forms of hand spinning existed as early as 15,000 years ago in Asia, and 12,000 years ago in North Africa. Many of the earliest methods and tools are still in use to this day, especially the various drop spindles, and the Indian and Navajo types of spindles. The spinning wheel itself is believed to have evolved in India 800 to 1,000 years ago.
Now you can master this timeless craft through the clear instructions and easy-to-follow directions of well-known spinning authority Carol Kroll. Drawing upon her years of valuable experience, the author shows you everything you need to know from set-up to finished product. You'll learn about the different kinds of spindles and spinning wheels, their history, development, and modern applications. Her lucid text demonstrates the proper methods of preparing the fiber for spinning including: selecting the fiber, sorting, washing, adding oil, and carding.
Whether you're a novice or an experienced hand, Carol Kroll's expert advice shows you the ins and outs of: Spinning with a Drop Spindle; Spinning on a Treadle Wheel; Finishing the Yarn; How to Shop for a Spinning Wheel; Spinning with Wool and Making the Most of Natural and Other Animal Fibers; Synthetic Fibers; Making Your Own Spindle; and The Fun of Creating Novelty Yarns.
Plus, an access and resources section with suggested further reading, supplies, services, and much more to get you started making something that is truly your own, from the first step to the last.
To anyone concerned with the design of fabrics, the structure of the cloth is, of course, of prime importance for achieving best results and most satisfying ultimate appearance. Oelsner's A Handbook of Weaves, long the most reliable and comprehensive source of information on the subject, will save you hours of research work and offer information necessary for new cloth effects. It covers the field thoroughly from the simple draft and plain weave to the more complicated fancy weaves, with a clear, lucid text and with 1,875 working diagrams.
Just a few of the many weaves fully explained, differentiated, and illustrated in this volume are irregular, double-stitched, and filling satins; basket and rib weaves; steep, undulating, broken, offset, corkscrew, interlocking, herringbone, and fancy twills; honeycomb and lace weaves; tricot and metalassé weaves; corded, piqué, and kersey weaves; and literally hundreds more.
The outstanding section on crépe weaves (over 45 pages, 342 weaves) explains 10 different methods, including arranging other weaves, rearranging warp threads, interlocking a weave over another, drafting a weave in four squares, and transporting weaves in checkerboard order.
One of the work's most valuable features, particularly to the manufacturer, is in the section which shows with text and picture how from a simple swatch of material one may obtain the full details of construction and layout of any fabric made: weave and color patterns, number of threads per square inch, weight of cloth, sizes of warp yarn and filling yarn, etc.
A full chapter is given showing how interesting effects may be obtained by arrangement of yarns in contrasting colors in either warp or filling or both, and how effects can be produced by combining weave and color patterns in the same cloth. A large number of examples, with 207 diagrams, show color effects in twills, basket weaves, crépes, etc.
Other topics covered here that are rarely found in textile design books are breaks or recesses in the cloth, weaves that deflect certain threads, broche fabrics, double transposed textures, reform weaves, the determination of the best weaves, the determination of the best types of weave for specific textures and many similar topics.
These and many other special features add to this unsurpassed collection's immense value for the textile manufacturer, the designer, the stylist, the hand-loom weaver, the power-loom weaver, and the teacher and student of textiles. It is at once a fully indexed reference, a lucid "how-to-do-it" book, and a storehouse of unusual information and practical suggestions.
Includes a supplement on the analysis of weaves and fabrics.
This is the first paperback edition of a manual well known to weavers for its great thoroughness, clarity, and value to beginning and professional weavers alike. The author has drawn upon many years of experience as a teacher and writer in preparing this practical text of basic weaving techniques and projects from the simplest to the extremely complex.
Each topic of weaving theory and technique is presented with its practical applications in mind. Within the first thirty pages, readers learn enough to complete their first weaving project, a bookmark, and this leads directly to the weaving of rugs on a loom, the process of weaving on a two-harness loom, threading plain weave from a draft, making a two-harness table loom (readers following the clear diagram and instructions will have no trouble building the loom), preparing the weft, handling of threads, two-harness design methods, the weaving of rag rugs in plain weave, useful articles woven with striped warps and wefts, tapestry techniques, and design weaves.
For advanced weavers, the second major section of the book covers a great variety of weaves for the four-harness loom and related information: how to warp and thread a four-harness loom, weaving both plain and pattern weave, the twill family of weaves and herringbone variations, the principles of overshot pattern weaving, the diamond or cross family, the monk's belt pattern and its uses, practical overshot patterns, designing drafts and special techniques, ways of weaving overshot, special four-harness techniques (summer and winter weave, the Bronson weave, the M's and O's weave, the crackle weave, the waffle weave, matta technique, syncopation, double weaving on a four-harness loom).
The author then details multi-harness weaves such as multi-harness twill, eight-harness damask design, and several others. Then follow discussions of the uses of color in weaving designs, planning borders, the various draft notations (European and American), weaving with synthetic fibers, thread sizes, counts and yardage, and costs of handwoven fabrics. There is a thread chart of warp settings and suitable wefts. A final chapter gives instructions for making several projects from hand-woven fabrics (a folder for linens, a small ornamental box, jackets and suits, and others). The text is fully illustrated throughout with photographs and labelled diagrams.
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