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The leading art critic of the Victorian era, John Ruskin created a large body of work, writing influential essays and treatises on subjects as varied as geology, architecture, ornithology, literature, education, botany and political economy, to name but a few. This comprehensive eBook presents the complete published works of John Ruskin, with numerous illustrations, rare texts appearing in digital print for the first time, informative introductions and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 1)

* Beautifully illustrated with images relating to Ruskin’s life and works
* Concise introductions to the famous art books and other texts
* ALL the art criticism and published prose works, with individual contents tables
* Images of how the books were first printed, giving your eReader a taste of the original texts
* Excellent formatting of the texts
* Famous works such as MODERN PAINTERS and THE STONES OF VENICE are fully illustrated with their original artwork
* The complete poetry is presented in the scholarly Cook and Wedderburn edition
* Special alphabetical contents tables for the poetry - easily locate the poems you want to read
* The complete letters of the FORS CLAVIGERA with footnotes (Cook and Wedderburn), including the famous Whistler pamphlet – first time in digital print
* All the travel books
* Includes Ruskin’s rare autobiography PRAETERITA (Cook and Wedderburn), accompanied with the scarce DILECTA
* Special criticism section, with essays evaluating Ruskin’s contribution to literature and art criticism
* Features a bonus biography - discover Ruskin’s literary life
* Even offers a special illustrated section on Ruskin’s paintings
* Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres

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CONTENTS:

The Art Criticism
MODERN PAINTERS
THE SEVEN LAMPS OF ARCHITECTURE
PRE-RAPHAELITISM
GIOTTO AND HIS WORKS IN PADUA
LECTURES ON ARCHITECTURE AND PAINTING DELIVERED AT EDINBURGH IN NOVEMBER, 1853
LETTERS TO THE “TIMES” ON THE TURNER BEQUEST 1856, 1857
NOTES ON THE TURNER GALLERY AT MARLBOROUGH HOUSE
THE ELEMENTS OF DRAWING
A JOY FOR EVER
THE TWO PATHS
THE ELEMENTS OF PERSPECTIVE
SESAME AND LILIES
LECTURES ON ART DELIVERED BEFORE THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD IN HILARY TERM, 1870
ARATRA PENTELICI
THE EAGLE’S NEST
THE POETRY OF ARCHITECTURE
ARIADNE FLORENTINA
FRONDES AGRESTES
VAL D’ARNO
NOTES BY MR. RUSKIN ON HIS DRAWINGS BY THE LATE J. M. W. TURNER
THE LAWS OF FÉSOLE
NOTES ON SAMUEL PROUT AND WILLIAM HUNT
CIRCULAR RESPECTING MEMORIAL STUDIES OF ST. MARK’S, VENICE
THE ART OF ENGLAND
THE PLEASURES OF ENGLAND
FINAL LECTURES AT OXFORD
LECTURES ON LANDSCAPE
LECTURES AND NOTES FOR LECTURES ON GREEK ART AND MYTHOLOGY

The Travel Books
THE STONES OF VENICE
MORNINGS IN FLORENCE
ST. MARK’S REST
‘OUR FATHERS HAVE TOLD US’

Other Prose Works
THE KING OF THE GOLDEN RIVER
THE HARBOURS OF ENGLAND
‘UNTO THIS LAST’
THE ETHICS OF THE DUST
THE CROWN OF WILD OLIVE
TIME AND TIDE BY WEARE AND TYNE
LEONI: A LEGEND OF ITALY
THE QUEEN OF THE AIR
FORS CLAVIGERA
MUNERA PULVERIS
LOVE’S MEINIE
PROSERPINA
ELEMENTS OF ENGLISH PROSODY
ARROWS OF THE CHACE
THE STORM CLOUD OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
ON THE OLD ROAD
PRAETERITA
HORTUS INCLUSUS
RUSKINIANA

The Poetry
INTRODUCTION TO RUSKIN’S POETRY by E. T. Cook
THE POEMS: TABLE OF CONTENTS
LIST OF POEMS IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER

The Paintings
RUSKIN’S PAINTINGS

The Criticism
RUSKIN by G. K. Chesterton
RUSKIN by Henry Major Tomlinson
RUSKIN AS POET by W. H. Davenport Adams
CONTEMPORARY NOTES ON WHISTLER vs. RUSKIN by Henry James
RUSKIN by Virginia Woolf

The Biography
THE LIFE OF JOHN RUSKIN by W. G. Collingwood

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Can drawing — sound, honest representation of the world as the eye sees it, not tricks with the pencil or a few "effects" — be learned from a book? One of the most gifted draftsmen, who is also one of the greatest art critics and theorists of all time, answers that question with a decided "Yes." He is John Ruskin, the author of this book, a classic in art education as well as a highly effective text for the student and amateur today.
The work is in three parts, cast in the form of letters to a student, successively covering "First Practice," "Sketching from Nature," and "Colour and Composition." Starting with the bare fundamentals (what kind of drawing pen to buy; shading a square evenly), and using the extremely practical method of exercises which the student performs from the very first, Ruskin instructs, advises, guides, counsels, and anticipates problems with sensitivity. The exercises become more difficult, developing greater and greater skills until Ruskin feels his reader is ready for watercolors and finally composition, which he treats in detail as to the laws of principality, repetition, continuity, curvature, radiation, contrast, interchange, consistency, and harmony. All along the way, Ruskin explains, in plain, clear language, the artistic and craftsmanlike reasons behind his practical advice — underlying which, of course, is Ruskin's brilliant philosophy of honest, naturally observed art which has so much affected our aesthetic.
Three full-page plates and 48 woodcuts and diagrams (the latter from drawings by the author) show the student what the text describes. An appendix devotes many pages to the art works which may be studied with profit.
 "The King of the Golden River" is a delightful fairy tale told with all Ruskin's charm of style, his appreciation of mountain scenery, and with his usual insistence upon drawing a moral. None the less, it is quite unlike his other writings. All his life long his pen was busy interpreting nature and pictures and architecture, or persuading to better views those whom he believed to be in error, or arousing, with the white heat of a prophet's zeal, those whom he knew to be unawakened. There is indeed a good deal of the prophet about John Ruskin. Though essentially an interpreter with a singularly fine appreciation of beauty, no man of the nineteenth century felt more keenly that he had a mission, and none was more loyal to what he believed that mission to be.

 

While still in college, what seemed a chance incident gave occasion and direction to this mission. A certain English reviewer had ridiculed the work of the artist Turner. Now Ruskin held Turner to be the greatest landscape painter the world had seen, and he immediately wrote a notable article in his defense. Slowly this article grew into a pamphlet, and the pamphlet into a book, the first volume of "Modern Painters." The young man awoke to find himself famous. In the next few years four more volumes were added to "Modern Painters," and the other notable series upon art, "The Stones of Venice" and "The Seven Lamps of Architecture," were sent forth.

 

Then, in 1860, when Ruskin was about forty years old, there came a great change. His heaven-born genius for making the appreciation of beauty a common possession was deflected from its true field. He had been asking himself what are the conditions that produce great art, and the answer he found declared that art cannot be separated from life, nor life from industry and industrial conditions. A civilization founded upon unrestricted competition therefore seemed to him necessarily feeble in appreciation of the beautiful, and unequal to its creation. In this way loyalty to his mission bred apparent disloyalty. Delightful discourses upon art gave way to fervid pleas for humanity. For the rest of his life he became a very earnest, if not always very wise, social reformer and a passionate pleader for what he believed to be true economic ideals.

 

There is nothing of all this in "The King of the Golden River." Unlike his other works, it was written merely to entertain. Scarcely that, since it was not written for publication at all, but to meet a challenge set him by a young girl.

 

The circumstance is interesting. After taking his degree at Oxford, Ruskin was threatened with consumption and hurried away from the chill and damp of England to the south of Europe. After two years of fruitful travel and study he came back improved in health but not strong, and often depressed in spirit. It was at this time that the Guys, Scotch friends of his father and mother, came for a visit to his home near London, and with them their little daughter Euphemia. The coming of this beautiful, vivacious, light-hearted child opened a new chapter in Ruskin's life. Though but twelve years old, she sought to enliven the melancholy student, absorbed in art and geology, and bade him leave these and write for her a fairy tale. He accepted, and after but two sittings, presented her with this charming story. The incident proved to have awakened in him a greater interest than at first appeared, for a few years later "Effie" Grey became John Ruskin's wife. Meantime she had given the manuscript to a friend. Nine years after it was written, this friend, with John Ruskin's permission, gave the story to the world.

 

It was published in London in 1851, with illustrations by the celebrated Richard Doyle, and at once became a favorite. Three editions were printed the first year, and soon it had found its way into German, Italian, and Welsh. Since then countless children have had cause to be grateful for the young girl's challenge that won the story of Gluck's golden mug and the highly satisfactory handling of the Black Brothers by Southwest Wind, Esquire.

 

For this edition new drawings have been prepared by Mr. Hiram P. Barnes. They very successfully preserve the spirit of Doyle's illustrations, which unfortunately are not technically suitable for reproduction here.

 

In the original manuscript there was an epilogue bearing the heading "Charitie"—a morning hymn of Treasure Valley, whither Gluck had returned to dwell, and where the inheritance lost by cruelty was regained by love:

 

The beams of morning are renewed The valley laughs their light to see And earth is bright with gratitude And heaven with charitie.

 R.H. COE

"I believe architecture must be the beginning of arts, and that the others must follow her in their time and order; and I think the prosperity of our schools of painting and sculpture, in which no one will deny the life, though many the health, depends upon that of our architecture." — John Ruskin.
In August of 1848, John Ruskin and his new bride visited northern France, for the gifted young critic wished to write a work that would examine the essence of Gothic architecture. By the following April, the book was finished. Titled The Seven Lamps of Architecture, it was far more than a treatise on the Gothic style; instead, it elaborated Ruskin's deepest convictions of the nature and role of architecture and its aesthetics. The book was published to immediate acclaim and has since become an acknowledged classic.
The "seven lamps" are Sacrifice, Truth, Power, Beauty, Life, Memory, and Obedience. In delineating the relationship of these terms to architecture, Ruskin distinguishes between architecture and mere building. Architecture is an exalting discipline that must dignify and ennoble public life. It must preserve the purity of the materials it uses; and it must serve as a source of power and renewal for the society that produces it. The author expounds these and many other ideas with exceptional passion and knowledge, expressed in a masterly prose style.
Today, Ruskin's timeless observations are as relevant as they were in Victorian times, making The Seven Lamps of Architecture required reading for architects, students, and other lovers of architecture, who will find in these pages a thoughtful and inspiring approach to one of man's noblest endeavors.
This authoritative edition includes excellent reproductions of the 14 original plates of Ruskin's superb drawings of architectural details from such structures as the Doge's Palace in Venice, Giotto's Campanile in Florence, and the Cathedral of Rouen.
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