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A giant of the ancient literary world, Plato has shaped the works of many other great minds. This collection offers Plato’s complete works, including the apocrypha texts, as well as all of Plato’s original Greek texts. Delphi’s Ancient Classics series provides eReaders with the wisdom of the Classical world, with both English translations and the original Greek texts.  This comprehensive eBook presents Plato’s complete extant works, with relevant illustrations, informative introductions and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 2)

 

Features:
* ALL of the dialogues, with excellent formatting
* ALL of the spurious works in English translation, including texts often missed out of other collections
* individual contents tables for the longer dialogues, enabling you to navigate the texts with ease
* concise introductions for all of the works, giving valuable contextual information
* includes Plato’s epigrams and epistles
* many of the translations have also appeared in the famous Loeb Classical Library editions of Plato
* features translations by Benjamin Jowett
* special Greek pronunciation pages – experience the true sound of Plato’s 2500 year-old wisdom!
* numerous images relating to Plato, his works and the places he lived in
* even includes a special criticism section, with scholarly works assessing Plato’s contribution to the philosophical world
* boasts three biographies by classical writers – explore Plato’s adventurous life!
* includes Diogenes Laërtius’ famous biography
* scholarly ordering of texts, with a front no-nonsense master table of contents
* UPDATED with improved texts and translations


CONTENTS:

The Dialogues
EUTHYPHRO
APOLOGY
CRITO
HIPPIAS MAJOR
HIPPIAS MINOR
FIRST ALCIBIADES
CHARMIDES
LACHES
LYSIS
ION
PHAEDO
CRATYLUS
EUTHYDEMUS
PROTAGORAS
GORGIAS
MENO
MENEXENUS
SYMPOSIUM
THE REPUBLIC
PHAEDRUS
PARMENIDES
THEAETETUS
CLITOPHON
TIMAEUS
CRITIAS
SOPHIST
STATESMAN
PHILEBUS
LAWS

The Spurious Works
SECOND ALCIBIADES
HIPPARCHUS
THE RIVAL LOVERS
THEAGES
MINOS
EPINOMIS
SISYPHUS
AXIOCHUS
DEMODOCUS
ERYXIAS
HALCYON
ON JUSTICE
ON VIRTUE
DEFINITIONS
EPIGRAMS

The Epistles
LIST OF EPISTLES

The Greek Texts
PRONOUNCING ANCIENT GREEK
LIST OF GREEK TEXTS

The Criticism
PLATO AND PLATONISM by Walter Horatio Pater
INTRODUCTION TO THE PHILOSOPHY AND WRITINGS OF PLATO by Thomas Taylor
Extract from ‘REPRESENTATIVE MEN’ by Ralph Waldo Emerson
PLATO: LITTLE JOURNEYS TO THE HOMES OF GREAT TEACHERS by Elbert Hubbard

The Biographies
PLATO: LIVES OF THE EMINENT PHILOSOPHERS by Diogenes Laërtius
THE LIFE OF PLATO by Hesychius of Miletus
THE LIFE OF PLATO by Olympiodorus

 



PERSONS OF THE DIALOGUE MENO; SOCRATES; A SLAVE OF MENO;

ANYTUS

Meno. Can you tell me, Socrates, whether virtue is acquired by

teaching or by practice; or if neither by teaching nor practice,

then whether it comes to man by nature, or in what other way?

Socrates. O Meno, there was a time when the Thessalians were

famous among the other Hellenes only for their riches and their

riding; but now, if I am not mistaken, they are equally famous for

their wisdom, especially at Larisa, which is the native city of your

friend Aristippus. And this is Gorgias' doing; for when he came there,

the flower of the Aleuadae, among them your admirer Aristippus, and

the other chiefs of the Thessalians, fell in love with his wisdom. And

he has taught you the habit of answering questions in a grand and bold

style, which becomes those who know, and is the style in which he

himself answers all comers; and any Hellene who likes may ask him

anything. How different is our lot! my dear Meno. Here at Athens there

is a dearth of the commodity, and all wisdom seems to have emigrated

from us to you. I am certain that if you were to ask any Athenian

whether virtue was natural or acquired, he would laugh in your face,

and say: "Stranger, you have far too good an opinion of me, if you

think that I can answer your question. For I literally do not know

what virtue is, and much less whether it is acquired by teaching or

not." And I myself, Meno, living as I do in this region of poverty, am

as poor as the rest of the world; and I confess with shame that I know

literally nothing about virtue; and when I do not know the "quid" of

anything how can I know the "quale"? How, if I knew nothing at all

of Meno, could I tell if he was fair, or the opposite of fair; rich

and noble, or the reverse of rich and noble? Do you think that I

could?

Men. No, Indeed. But are you in earnest, Socrates, in saying that

you do not know what virtue is? And am I to carry back this report

of you to Thessaly?

Soc. Not only that, my dear boy, but you may say further that I have

never known of any one else who did, in my judgment.

Men. Then you have never met Gorgias when he was at Athens?

Soc. Yes, I have.

Men. And did you not think that he knew?

Soc. I have not a good memory, Meno, and therefore I cannot now tell

what I thought of him at the time. And I dare say that he did know,
�Theodorus. Here we are, Socrates, true to our agreement of yesterday; and we bring with us a stranger from Elea, who is a disciple of Parmenides and Zeno, and a true philosopher.

Socrates. Is he not rather a god, Theodorus, who comes to us in the disguise of a stranger? For Homer says that all the gods, and especially the god of strangers, are companions of the meek and just, and visit the good and evil among men. And may not your companion be one of those higher powers, a cross-examining deity, who has come to spy out our weakness in argument, and to cross-examine

us?
Theod. Nay, Socrates, he is not one of the disputatious sort-he is

too good for that. And, in my opinion, he is not a god at all; but divine he certainly is, for this is a title which I should
give to all
philosophers.

Soc. Capital, my friend! and I may add that they are almost as
hard to be discerned as the gods. For the true philosophers, and
such as are not merely made up for the occasion, appear in various forms unrecognized by the ignorance of men, and they "hover about cities," as Homer declares, looking from above upon human life; and some think nothing of them, and others can never think enough; and sometimes they appear as statesmen, and sometimes as sophists; and then, again, to many they seem to be no better than madmen. I should like to ask our Eleatic friend, if he would tell us, what is thought about them in Italy, and to whom the terms are applied.

Theod. What terms?
Soc. Sophist, statesman, philosopher.
Theod. What is your difficulty about them, and what made you ask? Soc. I want to know whether by his countrymen they are regarded as

one or two; or do they, as the names are three, distinguish also three
kinds, and assign one to each name?

Theod. I dare say that the Stranger will not object to discuss the question. What do you say, Stranger?�

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