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 Professor Felix Hart and his wife Jessica are an expatriate English couple carrying baggage from their different pasts into their Toronto mid-life crises. For her, the early death of an idealized first husband has left a deep need for security, something Felix is unable to supply. For him, a two year medical trauma after a near fatal car accident seems to keep him struggling to take seriously anything in his personal or university life.

Felix, though amused and flattered by a visit to his wife's psychiatrist at her insistence, is himself drawn to misfits. Lisa (a hospital nurse), who eased his hospital pains, but later almost drags him into her own mired marital affairs. Alison (an English Department colleague he tries to help), enduring a brutal husband's sadism. A second Alison (a young student needing his comfort), having a dangerous affair with a married fellow professor. Louis Fein (a popular visiting scholar), whose mock theory is that every human relationship is a flirtation. Eleanor (working at CBC Television), a 29 year old virgin who perhaps handles Felix's sex counseling wisely.

In the end, his tennis playing partner and divorce lawyer friend Max, together with his needful wife Jessica, bring Felix to wonder whether real life should be more than just escapism into modern versions of jocosa materia, the old comic tales which are the subject of his serious academic research.

More fiction by F.W. Watt

Heads or Tails 23 Stories

After the Funeral

Loving Daughters

The Road to Sutton

The Youth Drug

The Lannigan Set-Up

Where is Julius

 Bill Hartley's life was shaped by a panoramic sweep of Canadian history. An illiterate prairie boy, he enlisted in 1914. Survived the Great War. Returned with a British war-bride nurse and their baby. Broke the virgin Saskatchewan soil of his soldier's homestead grant. For a decade grew wheat and bore more children. Sold his farm and moved his family west, like so many others, searching for a better life in Vancouver.

But there they found themselves plunged into the Great Depression. This ordeal passed easily for Tom, the youngest son, still a child during the struggles that drove his father into a frustrating attempt to educate himself and escape poverty. Looking back at his father's life, both having achieved success after the Second World War, Tom is caught up in his effort to understand the challenges his father endured. His strengths and weaknesses. The obstacles he overcame. The mistakes he made. And also the many ways, through the best and worst of times, that Tom's mother bravely played out her wifely part.

How should his father be judged? In what ways, if at all, is it Like Father Like Son? Tom is helped in his judgments by Max, family friend, almost an older brother, who has his own father-son relation to puzzle over. Both have complex memories of Bill Hartley's turbulent life as it touched theirs. Finally they may only agree that for all the sadness, there is life worth living after the funeral.

More fiction by F.W. Watt

Heads or Tails 23 Stories

Loving Daughters

The Road to Sutton

The Youth Drug

The Lannigan Set-Up

Joking Matters

Where is Julius

 Clarence Martin, a dour and testy small-town lawyer in his later sixties, likes to think he can maintain a stoical distance from the troubles of his clients, especially the women whose female nature is beyond his understanding. Yet over many years he keeps getting involved, especially with his old friend Gladys Hampton and her only child, Sarah. His dealings with them remind him of his own wife, Mary, long-divorced, for a reason he tries to forget, and his step-daughter Annabel, who like Sarah deserted an unhappy home as a teenager.

Clarence gets caught up, too, in Sarah's complicated life, including a dangerous episode from which she narrowly escapes unharmed, and which he brings to account in the safe confines of his office. Her early involvements with what appear to be highly unsuitable men result in her alienation from her mother, whose burning desire to preserve the continuity of her 150 year old family estate tests all of Clarence's patience, toughness, and legal skills.

Through all these personal and professional involvements, Clarence struggles to deal with the challenges, limitations, and humiliating mistakes of his own maleness. Perhaps they keep him from fully understanding the passionate affairs of the mothers and daughters in whose lives he plays so central a role. But in the end he can share the joy of an event that transcends all barriers between the sexes.

More fiction by F.W. Watt

Heads or Tails 23 Stories

After the Funeral

The Road to Sutton

The Youth Drug

The Lannigan Set-Up

Joking Matters

Where is Julius

The award-winning poet reinvents a genre in a stunning work that is both a novel and a poem, both an unconventional re-creation of an ancient Greek myth and a wholly original coming-of-age story set in the present.

Geryon, a young boy who is also a winged red monster, reveals the volcanic terrain of his fragile, tormented soul in an autobiography he begins at the age of five. As he grows older, Geryon escapes his abusive brother and affectionate but ineffectual mother, finding solace behind the lens of his camera and in the arms of a young man named Herakles, a cavalier drifter who leaves him at the peak of infatuation. When Herakles reappears years later, Geryon confronts again the pain of his desire and embarks on a journey that will unleash his creative imagination to its fullest extent. By turns whimsical and haunting, erudite and accessible, richly layered and deceptively simple, Autobiography of Red is a profoundly moving portrait of an artist coming to terms with the fantastic accident of who he is.

A NEW YORK TIMES NOTABLE BOOK OF THE YEAR
National Book Critics Circle Award Finalist  

"Anne Carson is, for me, the most exciting poet writing in English today." --Michael Ondaatje

"This book is amazing--I haven't discovered any writing in years so marvelously disturbing." --Alice Munro 

"A profound love story . . . sensuous and funny, poignant, musical and tender." --The New York Times Book Review

"A deeply odd and immensely engaging book. . . . [Carson] exposes with passionate force the mythic underlying the explosive everyday." --The Village Voice
 What begins as a shocking discovery of a drowning victim in a private lake in rural Ontario leads into a web of crime and politics with wider city, provincial, and even international complications. Mr. Lannigan of Lannigan and Ferris, a powerful business empire based in Toronto, but the target of veiled U.S. interests, finds his secluded semi-retirement haven north of the City invaded by platoons of police from local towns and by provincial detectives. They are trying to solve the mysteries surrounding the gruesome death on a property which was set up to protect Lannigan from the outside world, as well as to satisfy a hobby dear to this prominent but secretive citizen in his old age. Morgan Streit, an up and coming executive of Lannigan and Ferris, is charged with the job of winning the Toronto riding of the Finance Minister, whose re-election would serve the needs of the corporation and its U.S. interested party. His involvement with and his uneasy sense of responsibility for his wife’s au pair girl drag him into depths ahead for them both. In the end, Mr. Roger Ducharme, the ruthless private secretary for Mr. Lannigan, along with his physically imposing and brutal chauffeur, Spade, may meet the ugly fates they truly deserve. But perhaps it is Mr. Lannigan himself who best survives the terrible events, riding his favorite hobby to rest in a place of quiet comfort where his partner Mr. Ferris has found peace before him.

Other works by F.W. Watt:

Heads or Tails 23 Stories

After the Funeral

Loving Daughters

The Road to Sutton

The Youth Drug

Joking Matters

Where is Julius

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • From the author of The Eighty-Dollar Champion, the remarkable story of the heroic rescue of priceless horses in the closing days of World War II

WINNER OF THE PEN AWARD FOR RESEARCH NONFICTION

In the chaotic last days of the war, a small troop of battle-weary American soldiers captures a German spy and makes an astonishing find—his briefcase is empty but for photos of beautiful white horses that have been stolen and kept on a secret farm behind enemy lines. Hitler has stockpiled the world’s finest purebreds in order to breed the perfect military machine—an equine master race. But with the starving Russian army closing in, the animals are in imminent danger of being slaughtered for food.

With only hours to spare, one of the U.S. Army’s last great cavalrymen, Colonel Hank Reed, makes a bold decision—with General George Patton’s blessing—to mount a covert rescue operation. Racing against time, Reed’s small but determined force of soldiers, aided by several turncoat Germans, steals across enemy lines in a last-ditch effort to save the horses.

Pulling together this multistranded story, Elizabeth Letts introduces us to an unforgettable cast of characters: Alois Podhajsky, director of the famed Spanish Riding School of Vienna, a former Olympic medalist who is forced to flee the bomb-ravaged Austrian capital with his entire stable in tow; Gustav Rau, Hitler’s imperious chief of horse breeding, a proponent of eugenics who dreams of genetically engineering the perfect warhorse for Germany; and Tom Stewart, a senator’s son who makes a daring moonlight ride on a white stallion to secure the farm’s surrender.

A compelling account for animal lovers and World War II buffs alike, The Perfect Horse tells for the first time the full story of these events. Elizabeth Letts’s exhilarating tale of behind-enemy-lines adventure, courage, and sacrifice brings to life one of the most inspiring chapters in the annals of human valor.

Praise for The Perfect Horse

“Winningly readable . . . Letts captures both the personalities and the stakes of this daring mission with such a sharp ear for drama that the whole second half of the book reads like a WWII thriller dreamed up by Alan Furst or Len Deighton. . . . The right director could make a Hollywood classic out of this fairy tale.”The Christian Science Monitor

“Letts, a lifelong equestrienne, eloquently brings together the many facets of this unlikely, poignant story underscoring the love and respect of man for horses.”Kirkus Reviews
In the inimitable yarn-spinning fashion of Horse Tradin’ and Wild Cow Tales, Ben K. (Doc) Green now takes us back with him to the deep Southwest and the never-a-dull-moment years he spent as practicing horse doctor—working out of Fort Stockton, Texas—along the Pecos and the Rio Grande, in one of the last big “horse countries” of North America.
 
With precious little formal schooling, but with a perfect (if sometimes profane) corralside manner and plenty of natural wit, Doc became the first to hang up a shingle out there in the trans-Pecos country. And he didn’t start small! The territory he had for his practice was 420 miles north and south by 360 miles east and west. And he covered that territory by all means known to man—shank’s mare, horseback, buckboard, and (his standby for long hauls) a beat-up old coupe on whose body panels he kept his books in chalk.
 
To go with Doc on his rounds, visiting his “patients,” is a nostalgic and hilarious journey into a spacious yesterday—and a liberal education in the kind of horse and cow savvy of which precious little remains in the modern world. As a horseman it was a savvy he came by naturally. But perhaps he learned most from his own research: his own book on horse confirmation, privately published in several printings, is still a bible among practical horsemen; his research in his own laboratory on horse colors and pigmentation has made him an expert on what makes a “strawberry roan” or a “coyote dun.”
 
But the meat of Ben Green’s books is in his yarns. To hear him tell the tales of his struggles with mean and friendly stockmen, yellowweed fever, banditos, poison hay, and “drouth”—to say nothing of his canny mix of science and horse sense when treating animals “that ain’t house pets”—is a 100-proof old-time pleasure.
An eye-opening game-changer of a book that sheds new light on how horses learn, think, perceive, and perform, and explains how to work with the horse’s brain instead of against it.

In this illuminating book, brain scientist and horsewoman Janet Jones describes human and equine brains working together. Using plain language, she explores the differences and similarities between equine and human ways of negotiating the world. Mental abilities—like seeing, learning, fearing, trusting, and focusing—are discussed from both human and horse perspectives. Throughout, true stories of horses and handlers attempting to understand each other—sometimes successfully, sometimes not—help to illustrate the principles.

Horsemanship of every kind depends on mutual interaction between equine and human brains. When we understand the function of both, we can learn to communicate with horses on their terms instead of ours. By meeting horses halfway, we achieve many goals.

  • We improve performance.
  • We save valuable training time.
  • We develop much deeper bonds with our horses.
  • We handle them with insight and kindness instead of force or command.
  • We comprehend their misbehavior in ways that allow solutions.
  • We reduce the human mistakes we often make while working with them.

Instead of working against the horse’s brain, expecting him to function in unnatural and counterproductive ways, this book provides the information needed to ride with the horse’s brain. Each principle is applied to real everyday issues in the arena or on the trail, often illustrated with true stories from the author’s horse training experience. Horse Brain, Human Brain offers revolutionary ideas that should be considered by anyone who works with horses.

"Many artists seek to attain immortality through their art, but few would expect their work to outlast the human race and live on for billions of years. As Canadian poet Christian Bök has realized, it all comes down to the durability of your materials."—The Guardian

Internationally best-selling poet Christian Bök has spent more than ten years writing what promises to be the first example of "living poetry." After successfully demonstrating his concept in a colony of E. coli, Bök is on the verge of enciphering a beautiful, anomalous poem into the genome of an unkillable bacterium (Deinococcus radiodurans), which can, in turn, "read" his text, responding to it by manufacturing a viable, benign protein, whose sequence of amino acids enciphers yet another poem. The engineered organism might conceivably serve as a post-apocalyptic archive, capable of outlasting our civilization.

Book I of The Xenotext constitutes a kind of "demonic grimoire," providing a scientific framework for the project with a series of poems, texts, and illustrations. A Virgilian welcome to the Inferno, Book I is the "orphic" volume in a diptych, addressing the pastoral heritage of poets, who have sought to supplant nature in both beauty and terror. The book sets the conceptual groundwork for the second volume, which will document the experiment itself. The Xenotext is experimental poetry in the truest sense of the term.

Christian Bök is the author of Crystallography (1994) and Eunoia (2001), which won the Griffin Poetry Prize. He teaches at the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada.

Winner of the Griffin Poetry Prize (2002)

Stunning and masterful in its execution, Eunoia is a five-chapter book in which each chapter is a univocal lipogram.

The word ‘eunoia,’ which literally means ‘beautiful thinking,’ is the shortest word in English that contains all five vowels. Directly inspired by the Oulipo (l’Ouvroir de Littérature Potentielle), a French writers’ group interested in experimenting with different forms of literary constraint, Eunoia is a five-chapter book in which each chapteris a univocal lipogram – the first chapter has A as its only vowel, the second chapter E, etc. Each vowel takes on a distinct personality: the I is egotistical and romantic, the O jocular and obscene, the E elegiac and epic (including a retelling of the Iliad!).

Stunning in its implications and masterful in its execution, Eunoia has developed a cult following, garnering extensive praise and winning the Griffin Poetry Prize. The original edition was never released in the U.S., but it has already been a bestseller in Canada and the U.K. (published by Canongate Books), where it was listed as one of the Times’ top ten books of 2008.

This new edition features several new but related poems by Christian Bok and an expanded afterword.

'Eunoia is a novel that will drive everybody sane.' —Samuel Delany

'Eunoia takes the lipogram and rendersit obsolete.' —Kenneth Goldsmith

'A marvellous, musical texture of rhymes and echoes.' —Harry Mathews

'An exemplary monument for 21st century poetry.' —Charles Bernstein

'Bök's dazzling word games are the literary sensation of the year.' —The Times

'A resounding success ... brilliant.' —The Guardian

'Brilliant ... beautiful and strange.' —Today Programme, BBC Radio 4

'Impressive.' —Sunday Telegraph

'No mere Christmas stocking filler for Countdown fans. Rather, it's an ingenious little novel ... playful and irreverent ... charming.' —Metro

Riding Home:The Power of Horses to Heal, Horse Nation's must read book of 2016, is the first and only book to scientifically and experientially explain why horses have the extraordinary ability to emotionally transform the lives of thousands of men, women and children, whether they are horse lovers, or suffering from deep psychological wounds.

It is a book for anyone who wants to experience the joy, wonder, self-awareness and peace of mind that comes from creating a horse/human relationship, and it puts forth and clarifies the principles of today's Natural Horsemanship (or what was once referred to as "Horse Whispering")

Everyone knows someone who needs help: a husband, a wife, a partner, a child, a friend, a troubled teenager, a war veteran with PTSD, someone with autism, an addiction, anyone in emotional pain or who has lost their way. Riding Home provides riveting examples of how Equine Therapy has become one of today's most effective cutting-edge methods of healing.

Horses help us discover hidden parts of ourselves, whether we're seven or seventy. They model relationships that demonstrate acceptance, kindness, honesty, tolerance, patience, justice, compassion, and forgiveness. Horses cause all of us to become better people, better parents, better partners, and better friends.
A horse can be our greatest teacher, for horses have no egos, they never lie, they're never wrong and they manifest unparalleled compassion. It is this amazing power of horses to heal and teach us about ourselves that is accessible to anyone and found in the pages of Tim Hayes's Riding Home.

The information and lists of therapeutic and non-therapeutic equine programs, which are contained in the book, are also available at the book's website.
In horse racing greatness is defined by speed. Being the second fastest counts for little. You have to win. And win. And keep winning until every challenger of your generation is put to the sword. Of the twelve horses lined up on Newmarket Heath that 2011 day, one would do just that. And more. To become the greatest racehorse that has ever lived.

Frankel was born on 11 February 2008, with four white socks and a blaze, from impressive equine lines on both his parents’ sides. Simon Cooper revisits the whole of the horse’s life, giving readers an inside tour of the calm oasis that is life a stud farm, where a foal will live with his mother for the first year of his life. Next, the atmosphere of heady possibility that marks the early days of training. Roadwork. Gallops. Trials. Turning raw potential into something more. Frankel begins to set himself apart.

A detailed and fast-paced narrative breathlessly recounts the racing career of the horse who, by his retirement to stud at the age of 4, would be rated the greatest of all time. Cooper weaves the horse’s tale with those of his trainer, battling cancer, the stablehands who coped with his explosive nature, the work rider who tamed him, the the jockey who rode in all fourteen of his races, and the owner who saw his potential from the very beginning. The result is a rich and multifaceted tale of modern horse racing, the lives of everyone involved, human and equine, and the unadulterated glory of winning. And winning everything.

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