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Can you multiply 362 x .5 quickly in your head? Could you readily calculate the square of 41? How much is 635 divided by 2½? Can 727,648 be evenly divided by 8?
If any of these questions took you more than a few seconds to solve, you need this book. Short-Cut Math is a concise, remarkably clear compendium of about 150 math short-cuts — timesaving tricks that provide faster, easier ways to add, subtract, multiply, and divide.
By using the simple foolproof methods in this volume, you can double or triple your calculation speed — even if you always hated math in school. Here's a sampling of the amazingly effective techniques you will learn in minutes: Adding by 10 Groups; No-Carry Addition; Subtraction Without Borrowing; Multiplying by Aliquot Parts; Test for Divisibility by Odd and Even Numbers; Simplifying Dividends and Divisors; Fastest Way to Add or Subtract Any Pair of Fractions; Multiplying and Dividing with Mixed Numbers, and more.
The short-cuts in this book require no special math ability. If you can do ordinary arithmetic, you will have no trouble with these methods. There are no complicated formulas or unfamiliar jargon — no long drills or exercises. For each problem, the author provides an explanation of the method and a step-by-step solution. Then the short-cut is applied, with a proof and an explanation of why it works.
Students, teachers, businesspeople, accountants, bank tellers, check-out clerks — anyone who uses numbers and wishes to increase his or her speed and arithmetical agility, can benefit from the clear, easy-to-follow techniques given here.

This book discusses various novel analytical and numerical methods for solving partial and fractional differential equations. Moreover, it presents selected numerical methods for solving stochastic point kinetic equations in nuclear reactor dynamics by using Euler–Maruyama and strong-order Taylor numerical methods. The book also shows how to arrive at new, exact solutions to various fractional differential equations, such as the time-fractional Burgers–Hopf equation, the (3+1)-dimensional time-fractional Khokhlov–Zabolotskaya–Kuznetsov equation, (3+1)-dimensional time-fractional KdV–Khokhlov–Zabolotskaya–Kuznetsov equation, fractional (2+1)-dimensional Davey–Stewartson equation, and integrable Davey–Stewartson-type equation.

Many of the methods discussed are analytical–numerical, namely the modified decomposition method, a new two-step Adomian decomposition method, new approach to the Adomian decomposition method, modified homotopy analysis method with Fourier transform, modified fractional reduced differential transform method (MFRDTM), coupled fractional reduced differential transform method (CFRDTM), optimal homotopy asymptotic method, first integral method, and a solution procedure based on Haar wavelets and the operational matrices with function approximation. The book proposes for the first time a generalized order operational matrix of Haar wavelets, as well as new techniques (MFRDTM and CFRDTM) for solving fractional differential equations. Numerical methods used to solve stochastic point kinetic equations, like the Wiener process, Euler–Maruyama, and order 1.5 strong Taylor methods, are also discussed.


This textbook provides an accessible and concise introduction to numerical analysis for upper undergraduate and beginning graduate students from various backgrounds. It was developed from the lecture notes of four successful courses on numerical analysis taught within the MPhil of Scientific Computing at the University of Cambridge. The book is easily accessible, even to those with limited knowledge of mathematics.

Students will get a concise, but thorough introduction to numerical analysis. In addition the algorithmic principles are emphasized to encourage a deeper understanding of why an algorithm is suitable, and sometimes unsuitable, for a particular problem.

A Concise Introduction to Numerical Analysis strikes a balance between being mathematically comprehensive, but not overwhelming with mathematical detail. In some places where further detail was felt to be out of scope of the book, the reader is referred to further reading.

The book uses MATLAB® implementations to demonstrate the workings of the method and thus MATLAB's own implementations are avoided, unless they are used as building blocks of an algorithm. In some cases the listings are printed in the book, but all are available online on the book’s page at www.crcpress.com.

Most implementations are in the form of functions returning the outcome of the algorithm. Also, examples for the use of the functions are given. Exercises are included in line with the text where appropriate, and each chapter ends with a selection of revision exercises. Solutions to odd-numbered exercises are also provided on the book’s page at www.crcpress.com.

This textbook is also an ideal resource for graduate students coming from other subjects who will use numerical techniques extensively in their graduate studies.
The farther we get from our grade school days, the easier it is to forget those operations and nuances of arithmetical computation that keep recurring in our daily lives: interest and discount problems, time-payment calculations, tax problems, and so on.
This handy book is designed to streamline your methods and resharpen your calculation skills for a variety of situations. Starting with the most elementary operations, the book goes on to cover all basic topics and processes of arithmetic: addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, fractions, percentage, interest, ratio and proportion, denominate numbers, averages, etc. The text continues into other useful matters, such as powers and roots, logarithms, positive and negative numbers, harmonic progression, and introductory concepts of algebra.
Entirely practical in approach and using an easy-to-follow question and answer style, this book covers a wide range of common knotty areas: filling and emptying receptacles, scales for models and maps, business and financial calculations (partial payment problems, compound interest, bank and sales discount, profit and loss problems, etc.), angle measurement, mixtures and solutions, graph and chart problems, and the like.
The discussion contains numerous alternate and short-cut methods, such as quick ways to figure compound interest; to square a number from 1 to 100; to divide by 5, 25, 125, 99, etc.; to multiply two 2-digit numbers having the same figure in the tens place; and many more. These valuable tips, together with the huge fund of exercise problems (a total of 809, half of them answered in an appendix), help you to increase your computational proficiency and speed, and make this an extremely useful volume to have on your shelf at home or at work. Anyone who has to do any figuring at all — housewife, merchant, student — will profit from this refresher. Parents will find it an excellent source of material for helping children in school work.
For problems that require extensive computation, a C++ program can race through billions of examples faster than most other computing choices. C++ enables mathematicians of virtually any discipline to create programs to meet their needs quickly, and is available on most computer systems at no cost. C++ for Mathematicians: An Introduction for Students and Professionals accentuates C++ concepts that are most valuable for pure and applied mathematical research.

This is the first book available on C++ programming that is written specifically for a mathematical audience; it omits the language’s more obscure features in favor of the aspects of greatest utility for mathematical work. The author explains how to use C++ to formulate conjectures, create images and diagrams, verify proofs, build mathematical structures, and explore myriad examples. Emphasizing the essential role of practice as part of the learning process, the book is ideally designed for undergraduate coursework as well as self-study. Each chapter provides many problems and solutions which complement the text and enable you to learn quickly how to apply them to your own problems. Accompanying downloadable resources provide all numbered programs so that readers can easily use or adapt the code as needed.

Presenting clear explanations and examples from the world of mathematics that develop concepts from the ground up, C++ for Mathematicians can be used again and again as a resource for applying C++ to problems that range from the basic to the complex.

"ACT Prep Flashcard Workbook 6: ARITHMETIC REVIEW" 600 questions and answers highlight essential arithmetic definitions, problems, and concepts. Topics: Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication, and Division of Whole Numbers; Fractions and Decimals, Multiplication Tables, Word Problems, Percents, Measurement, Metric System, Square Roots and Powers, Real Numbers, Properties of Numbers [==================] ADDITIONAL WORKBOOKS: "ACT Prep Flashcard Workbook 2: VOCABULARY-Intermediate" 500 frequently tested ACT words every high school student should know. Perfect for anyone who wants to enrich their vocabulary! Improve your reading comprehension and conversation. Includes sample sentence, part of speech, pronunciation, succinct, easy-to-remember definition, and common synonyms and antonyms. _______________ "ACT Prep Flashcard Workbook 9: ALGEBRA 2-TRIGONOMETRY" 500 questions and answers that focus on essential advanced algebra and trigonometry concepts. (Illustrated) Topics: Linear Equations, Quadratics, Conic Sections, Logarithms, Trig. Functions, Sequence and Series ==================== "EXAMBUSTERS ACT Prep Workbooks" provide comprehensive, fundamental ACT review--one fact at a time--to prepare students to take practice ACT tests. Each ACT study guide focuses on one specific subject area covered on the ACT exam. From 300 to 600 questions and answers, each volume in the ACT series is a quick and easy, focused read. Reviewing ACT flash cards is the first step toward more confident ACT preparation and ultimately, higher ACT exam scores!
A lively collection of fun and challenging problems in ancient Egyptian math

The mathematics of ancient Egypt was fundamentally different from our math today. Contrary to what people might think, it wasn't a primitive forerunner of modern mathematics. In fact, it can’t be understood using our current computational methods. Count Like an Egyptian provides a fun, hands-on introduction to the intuitive and often-surprising art of ancient Egyptian math. David Reimer guides you step-by-step through addition, subtraction, multiplication, and more. He even shows you how fractions and decimals may have been calculated—they technically didn’t exist in the land of the pharaohs. You’ll be counting like an Egyptian in no time, and along the way you’ll learn firsthand how mathematics is an expression of the culture that uses it, and why there’s more to math than rote memorization and bewildering abstraction.

Reimer takes you on a lively and entertaining tour of the ancient Egyptian world, providing rich historical details and amusing anecdotes as he presents a host of mathematical problems drawn from different eras of the Egyptian past. Each of these problems is like a tantalizing puzzle, often with a beautiful and elegant solution. As you solve them, you’ll be immersed in many facets of Egyptian life, from hieroglyphs and pyramid building to agriculture, religion, and even bread baking and beer brewing.

Fully illustrated in color throughout, Count Like an Egyptian also teaches you some Babylonian computation—the precursor to our modern system—and compares ancient Egyptian mathematics to today’s math, letting you decide for yourself which is better.
This book is intended to fill the gap between the "ideal precision" digital signal processing (DSP) that is widely taught, and the limited precision implementation skills that are commonly required in fixed-point processors and field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). These skills are often neglected at the university level, particularly for undergraduates. We have attempted to create a resource both for a DSP elective course and for the practicing engineer with a need to understand fixed-point implementation. Although we assume a background in DSP, Chapter 2 contains a review of basic theory and Chapter 3 reviews random processes to support the noise model of quantization error. Chapter 4 details the binary arithmetic that underlies fixed-point processors and then introduces fractional format for binary numbers. Chapter 5 covers the noise model for quantization error and the effects of coefficient quantization in filters. Because of the numerical sensitivity of IIR filters, they are used extensively as an example system in both Chapters 5 and 6. Fortunately, the principles of dealing with limited precision can be applied to a wide variety of numerically sensitive systems, not just IIR filters. Chapter 6 discusses the problems of product roundoff error and various methods of scaling to avoid overflow. Chapter 7 discusses limit cycle effects and a few common methods for minimizing them. There are a number of simple exercises integrated into the text to allow you to test your understanding. Answers to the exercises are included in the footnotes. A number of MATLAB examples are provided in the text. They generally assume access to the Fixed-Point Toolbox. If you lack access to this software, consider either purchasing or requesting an evaluation license from The Mathworks. The code listed in the text and other helpful MATLAB code is also available at http://www.morganclaypool.com/page/padgett and http://www.rose-hulman.edu/padgett/fpsp. You will also find MATLAB exercises designed to demonstrate each of the four types of error discussed in Chapters 5 and 6. Simulink examples are also provided on the web site. Table of Contents: Getting Started / DSP Concepts / Random Processes and Noise / Fixed Point Numbers / Quantization Effects: Data and Coefficients / Quantization Effects - Round-Off Noise and Overflow / Limit Cycles
The subject of partial differential equations holds an exciting and special position in mathematics. Partial differential equations were not consciously created as a subject but emerged in the 18th century as ordinary differential equations failed to describe the physical principles being studied. The subject was originally developed by the major names of mathematics, in particular, Leonard Euler and Joseph-Louis Lagrange who studied waves on strings; Daniel Bernoulli and Euler who considered potential theory, with later developments by Adrien-Marie Legendre and Pierre-Simon Laplace; and Joseph Fourier's famous work on series expansions for the heat equation. Many of the greatest advances in modern science have been based on discovering the underlying partial differential equation for the process in question. J ames Clerk Maxwell, for example, put electricity and magnetism into a unified theory by estab lishing Maxwell's equations for electromagnetic theory, which gave solutions for problems in radio wave propagation, the diffraction of light and X-ray developments. Schrodinger's equation for quantum mechankal processes at the atomic level leads to experimentally verifiable results which have changed the face of atomic physics and chemistry in the 20th century. In fluid mechanics, the Navier-Stokes' equations form a basis for huge number-crunching activities associated with such widely disparate topics as weather forcasting and the design of supersonic aircraft. Inevitably the study of partial differential equations is a large undertaking, and falls into several areas of mathematics.
Advanced Problem Solving Using MapleTM: Applied Mathematics, Operations Research, Business Analytics, and Decision Analysis applies the mathematical modeling process by formulating, building, solving, analyzing, and criticizing mathematical models. Scenarios are developed within the scope of the problem-solving process.

The text focuses on discrete dynamical systems, optimization techniques, single-variable unconstrained optimization and applied problems, and numerical search methods. Additional coverage includes multivariable unconstrained and constrained techniques. Linear algebra techniques to model and solve problems such as the Leontief model, and advanced regression techniques including nonlinear, logistics, and Poisson are covered. Game theory, the Nash equilibrium, and Nash arbitration are also included.

Features:

  • The text’s case studies and student projects involve students with real-world problem solving
  • Focuses on numerical solution techniques in dynamical systems, optimization, and numerical analysis
  • The numerical procedures discussed in the text are algorithmic and iterative
  • Maple is utilized throughout the text as a tool for computation and analysis
  • All algorithms are provided with step-by-step formats

    About the Authors:

    William P. Fox

    is an emeritus professor in the Department of Defense Analysis at the Naval Postgraduate School. Currently, he is an adjunct professor, Department of Mathematics, the College of William and Mary. He received his PhD at Clemson University and has many publications and scholarly activities including twenty books and over one hundred and fifty journal articles.

    William C. Bauldry

    , Prof. Emeritus and Adjunct Research Prof. of Mathematics at Appalachian State University, received his PhD in Approximation Theory from Ohio State. He has published many papers on pedagogy and technology, often using Maple, and has been the PI of several NSF-funded projects incorporating technology and modeling into math courses. He currently serves as Associate Director of COMAP’s Math Contest in Modeling (MCM).
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