More related to marketing

In Educating the Consumer-Citizen: A History of the Marriage of Schools, Advertising, and Media, Joel Spring charts the rise of consumerism as the dominant American ideology of the 21st century. He documents and analyzes how, from the early 19th century through the present, the combined endeavors of schools, advertising, and media have led to the creation of a consumerist ideology and ensured its central place in American life and global culture.

Spring first defines consumerist ideology and consumer-citizen and explores their 19th-century origins in schools, children's literature, the commercialization of American cities, advertising, newspapers, and the development of department stores. He then traces the rise of consumerist ideology in the 20th century by looking closely at: the impact of the home economics profession on the education of women as consumers and the development of an American cuisine based on packaged and processed foods; the influence of advertising images of sports heroes, cowboys, and the clean-shaven businessman in shaping male identity; the outcomes of the growth of the high school as a mass institution on the development of teenage consumer markets; the consequences of commercial radio and television joining with the schools to educate a consumer-oriented population so that, by the 1950s, consumerist images were tied to the Cold War and presented as the "American way of life" in both media and schools; the effects of the civil rights movement on integrating previously excluded groups into the consumer society; the changes the women's movement demanded in textbooks, school curricula, media, and advertising that led to a new image of women in the consumer market; and the ascent of fast food education. Spring carries the story into the 21st century by examining the evolving marriage of schools, advertising, and media and its ongoing role in educating the consumer-citizen and creating an integrated consumer market.

This book will be of wide interest to scholars, professionals, and students across foundations of education, history and sociology of education, educational policy, mass communications, American history, and cultural studies. It is highly appropriate as a text for courses in these areas.
Until recently government policy in the UK has encouraged an expansion of Higher Education to increase participation and with an express aim of creating a more educated workforce. This expansion has led to competition between Higher Education institutions, with students increasingly positioned as consumers and institutions working to improve the extent to which they meet ‘consumer demands’.

Especially given the latest government funding cuts, the most prevalent outlook in Higher Education today is one of business, forcing institutions to reassess the way they are managed and promoted to ensure maximum efficiency, sales and ‘profits’. Students view the opportunity to gain a degree as a right, and a service which they have paid for, demanding a greater choice and a return on their investment. Changes in higher education have been rapid, and there has been little critical research into the implications. This volume brings together internationally comparative academic perspectives, critical accounts and empirical research to explore fully the issues and experiences of education as a commodity, examining:

the international and financial context of marketisation the new purposes of universities the implications of university branding and promotion league tables and student surveys vs. quality of education the higher education market and distance learning students as ‘active consumers’ in the co-creation of value changing student experiences, demands and focus.

With contributions from many of the leading names involved in Higher Education including Ron Barnett, Frank Furedi, Lewis Elton, Roger Brown and also Laurie Taylor in his journalistic guise as an academic at the University of Poppleton, this book will be essential reading for many.

This timely book outlines the growth and development of marketing and branding practices in public education. The authors highlight why these practices have become important across key fields within public education, including leadership and governance, budgeting and finance, strategic initiatives, use of new technology, the role of teachers in marketing, and messaging. From an organizational perspective, they explore the implications of edvertising on the democratic mission of public education, especially as related to issues of equity and access for students who have been historically underserved. The authors argue that expansive marketing campaigns, unequal funding sources, and lack of regulation are quickly and profoundly reshaping public education without the benefit of robust research or public debate. Selling School is important reading for principals navigating increasingly marketized school systems, for policymakers constructing legislation, and for parents negotiating school choice.

“DiMartino and Jessen are right in their prescient discussion of the muddling of public and private models in public education through marketing.”
—From the Foreword by Christopher Lubienski, Indiana University, Bloomington

“This book pioneers new ground as the authors move the literature on the marketization of education into a more nuanced analysis of how branding discourses and practices have entered the logic of public schooling.”
—Gary L. Anderson, New York University

“Essential for readers interested in learning about how private sector practices affect the functions of public schools.”
—Janelle Scott, University of California, Berkeley

Select students and teachers worked the room at a fundraising event for a New York City public high school Amy Brown calls College Preparatory Academy. It was their job to convince wealthy attendants that College Prep, with its largely minority and disadvantaged student body and its unusually high rate of graduation and college acceptance, was a worthy investment. To this end, students and teachers tried to seem needy and deserving, hoping to make supporters feel generous, important, and not threatened. How much, Brown asks, does competition for financing in urban public schools depend on marketing and perpetuating poverty in order to thrive? And are the actors in this drama deliberately playing up stereotypes of race and class?

A Good Investment? offers a firsthand look behind the scenes of the philanthropic approach to funding public education—a process in which social change in education policy and practice is aligned with social entrepreneurship. The appearance of success, equity, or justice in education, Brown argues, might actually serve to maintain stark inequalities and inhibit democracy. Her book shows that models of corporate or philanthropic charity in education can in fact reinforce the race and class hierarchies that they purport to alleviate.

As their voices reveal, the teachers and students on the receiving end of such a system can be critically conscious and ambivalent participants in a school’s racialized marketing and image management. Timely and provocative, this nuanced work exposes the unintended consequences of an education marketplace where charity masquerades as justice.


Is everything in a university for sale if the price is right? In this book, one of America's leading educators cautions that the answer is all too often "yes." Taking the first comprehensive look at the growing commercialization of our academic institutions, Derek Bok probes the efforts on campus to profit financially not only from athletics but increasingly, from education and research as well. He shows how such ventures are undermining core academic values and what universities can do to limit the damage.

Commercialization has many causes, but it could never have grown to its present state had it not been for the recent, rapid growth of money-making opportunities in a more technologically complex, knowledge-based economy. A brave new world has now emerged in which university presidents, enterprising professors, and even administrative staff can all find seductive opportunities to turn specialized knowledge into profit.


Bok argues that universities, faced with these temptations, are jeopardizing their fundamental mission in their eagerness to make money by agreeing to more and more compromises with basic academic values. He discusses the dangers posed by increased secrecy in corporate-funded research, for-profit Internet companies funded by venture capitalists, industry-subsidized educational programs for physicians, conflicts of interest in research on human subjects, and other questionable activities.


While entrepreneurial universities may occasionally succeed in the short term, reasons Bok, only those institutions that vigorously uphold academic values, even at the cost of a few lucrative ventures, will win public trust and retain the respect of faculty and students. Candid, evenhanded, and eminently readable, Universities in the Marketplace will be widely debated by all those concerned with the future of higher education in America and beyond.

Sell or Sink delivers the sales coaching and professional advice you need to keep your business afloat. Business leaders and sales executives need sales sense the ability to understand and apply consistent, reliable sales growth strategies to attain solid results. Sell or Sink explains a key strategy, and then provides structured questions and actions to help you apply the strategy to your own organization. Each strategy is short and direct so you can move through them quickly while extracting value, developing insight about your organization and providing meaningful information that you can implement right away. At the end of each chapter, diagnostics questions help you apply the foregoing strategies to your own organization. The diagnostics reveal what you need to put your organizations sales team and their results on a sustainable, healthy, upward trajectory. The purpose here is to help you to think constructively about your sales organization, what it is presently and what it can become in the future. Michael Krause wrote Sell or Sink to give you the basics of selling, then show you how to put the lessons to work to achieve your organizations sales goals. Without a basic understanding of selling strategies, you wont sell productively and, ultimately, you and your organization will sink. With a committed focus on these important areas of business basics and adherence to Krauses plan, any company can turn the tide of weak sales and loss of market share in their core line of business.
 Kolawole Oyeyemi’s insightful and witty non-fiction, ‘Kill or Get Killed: The Marketing Killer Instinct’, delves into the high stakes African business environment, as the author touches on the marketing intrigues, battles and wars that shaped a lot of brands across industries in Africa. 

Kill or Get Killed is a revolutionary marketing classic that borrowed the war metaphor and likened marketing to global politics and wars that are about shareholding struggles. Just as nations struggle for how much share of the world’s wealth they control, Brands and organizations go to war for shares too. Marketing wars and battles are fought, won and lost for increase, leadership and control of shares in various dimensions.

Kolawole submits that in these wars, you either kill or get killed; excuses are too costly. Meekness is not a virtue for the battlefield. It is not an environment for the fainthearted. Gentlemen cannot survive the terrain. Therefore, you need a killer instinct to survive the several battles and win the war.

Using some of Africa’s most famous brands and products to illustrate his points, Kolawole Oyeyemi convincingly show why some brands succeed where others fail. He unearths the fatal errors multinational brands commit; and also unveils the success stories of multinational brands that understood the peculiarities of the African business terrain and customized their corporate strategies and mode of operations to maximize value. 

The author explains why the future of successful marketing lies in creating brands, services, and company cultures and philosophies that inspire, include, and recognize the values, and the ever changing tastes and preferences of the target customers. Featuring an engaging, no-holds-barred wit, case studies and strategic depth, Kill or get killed offers a fresh perspective to marketing practice, and is a success toolkit for practicing marketers, brands, and companies that want to invest in Africa; and entrepreneurs that require marketing knowledge on the go.

Discover the successful marketing strategies of programs which have extended the resources of a university to its community. Marketing University Outreach Programs covers all aspects of continuing education program construction and the marketing process for positioning the university into the public. This book begins to eradicate academicians’ fears of marketing by showing them a contemporary marketing plan using terminology and examples familiar to them.Seventeen contributors--professors, administrators, and outreach professionals--comprehensively describe the strategies being successfully used to extend the resources of a university to its community through programs of extension, public service, and continuing education. Although many existing models of the education process contain parallels to elements in a generic marketing process, education is not viewed as a consumer product. Even educators may not view themselves as marketers involved in a marketing process. This attitude can place barriers between understanding the marketing process and how it relates to education. Marketing University Outreach Programs helps educators overcome these potential barriers; it explains marketing as a comprehensive process using terminology and examples which university extension and education professionals will find familiar and understandable.Application-oriented, it cites numerous examples of how the marketing process can be put to use immediately. Each chapter explores in-depth a separate segment of the marketing process involved in public university outreach programs: issue-based versus discipline-based programs program delivery and delivery technology funding outreach programs comprehensive promotional strategy customer service long-range planning marketing research information resources future trends model programsThis book is of value to the faculty of universities, specifically those in the disciplines with a mandate for professional renewal or recertification (engineering, medicine, education); faculty and professional staff in divisions of continuing education; program leadership in cooperative extension organizations (as well as those in other identifiable university extension units); and faculty affiliated with applied research centers. Members of professional associations focused on higher education outreach can also successfully apply these strategies.
Universities and Globalization: To Market, To Market examines the operations of power and knowledge in international education under conditions of globalization, with a focus on the three biggest exporters of higher education--the United States, Australia, and the United Kingdom. An interdisciplinary approach based on the core social sciences is used to explore the power relations that shape global education networks. The role of nation-states in creating the conditions for education markets and the desire for a Westernized template of international education in the postcolonial world is discussed. The volume offers a sophisticated attempt to recast international education as a series of geopolitical and geoeconomic engagements that transcend simple supply and demand dynamics.

Engaging with the theoretical debates about education and globalization, this book examines global cultural "flows" and boundary crossings, the cultural economy of education networks, and the possibilities for supra-territorial subjectivities. International education markets are examined from the perspectives of both first world producers and postcolonial consumers. By investigating how first world universities imagine and enact the global in their marketing practices, the expressions of cultural diversity valued by education markets, and the types of individual and institutional subjectivities merging from markets, Universities and Globalization: To Market, To Market offers students, faculty, administrators, marketing consultants, and others who work in the area a highly nuanced account of the global relations fostered by education markets. This original, critical examination of the forms and cultural politics of international education is a significant contribution to the field.
Today's business world is confusing and uncertain. Things move so fast, it seems that every day there is a new technology, a new marketing strategy and a new way to attract customers. How do you make sense of it all? Is the hot new trend you're hearing about the wave of the future or just another passing fad?

Louis Patler has the answers. As a leading trend-analysis and market-research guru for companies such as American Express, General Dynamics, Lloyds Bank and Dell Computers, Patler has spent the last twenty years studying emerging business trends and tracking their impact in the marketplace. Through this intense research and remarkable insights into the most successful and innovative companies, Patler has discovered the key to doing business in the 21st century--the trends and strategies that are here to stay.

--Don't expect loyalty. Today's employees will not stay at a job for more than three years. Plan for this and take advantage of it.
--Forget what you do "best." Your company's most valued traditions or processes are often the ones holding it back.
--The customer is not always right. Offer savings and specials to your most valuable and loyal customers and let the rest shop somewhere else.
--The future is here. Things will never "go back to normal"; this is normal!
--and countless more...

TrendSmart not only reveals the most important business developments, but shows you how to use them to make your business strong and leap ahead of the competition. TrendSmart managers lead with strength and vision, create a group of happy and loyal customers and give employees the tools they need to help the company grow. TrendSmart is the tool every leader, manager and business owner needs to succeed today and in the future.

"Louis Patler is to change as Mark McGwire is to baseball--a man with the power to shatter myths, raise standards and inspire greatness."--Jay Conrad Levinson, author of Guerilla Marketing

"Reading Louis Patler awakens your mind and renews your energy for this marathon race we call business."--Jim Kouzes, Chairman, Tom Peters Group Learning Systems
By almost any measure, higher education is a vital part of the U.S. economy and society. Yet there is concern that the sector is inefficient or ill equipped to adapt to a changing environment. The information revolution, an aging population, demographic shifts, and a declining fiscal base all present it with major challenges.

In Pursuit of Prestige describes the results of a two-year study of higher education in the United States designed to shed light on these issues. This volume examines higher education as an industry. It focuses on how institutions serve four identifiable markets that generate revenues (student enrollment, research funding, public fiscal support, and private giving). They analyze higher educational institutions' investment, pricing, and marketing behaviors, and the nature of competition among schools. They review the industry's basic conditions and market structure, then define the three key dimensions--degree level, scope, and resource allocation--by which institutions map out strategies for competing for markets.

The heart of the book is an analysis showing how these strategies are carried out based on site-visit data from 26 highly diverse colleges and universities. This broad sampling covers all geographic regions of the country and every type of institution from elite research universities to community colleges. The authors then consider what strategies are possible in particular markets and how they affect students and competing institutions. Their conclusion draws out the implications of strategy and competition for the various customers of the U.S. higher education industry. Groundbreaking and genuinely exploratory in methodology.

How can you turn an English department into a revenue center? How do you grade students if they are "customers" you must please? How do you keep industry from dictating a university's research agenda? What happens when the life of the mind meets the bottom line? Wry and insightful, Shakespeare, Einstein, and the Bottom Line takes us on a cross-country tour of the most powerful trend in academic life today--the rise of business values and the belief that efficiency, immediate practical usefulness, and marketplace triumph are the best measures of a university's success.

With a shrewd eye for the telling example, David Kirp relates stories of marketing incursions into places as diverse as New York University's philosophy department and the University of Virginia's business school, the high-minded University of Chicago and for-profit DeVry University. He describes how universities "brand" themselves for greater appeal in the competition for top students; how academic super-stars are wooed at outsized salaries to boost an institution's visibility and prestige; how taxpayer-supported academic research gets turned into profitable patents and ideas get sold to the highest bidder; and how the liberal arts shrink under the pressure to be self-supporting.

Far from doctrinaire, Kirp believes there's a place for the market--but the market must be kept in its place. While skewering Philistinism, he admires the entrepreneurial energy that has invigorated academe's dreary precincts. And finally, he issues a challenge to those who decry the ascent of market values: given the plight of higher education, what is the alternative?





Table of Contents:

Introduction: The New U

Part I: The Higher Education Bazaar
1. This Little Student Went to Market
2. Nietzsche's Niche: The University of Chicago
3. Benjamin Rush's "Brat": Dickinson College
4. Star Wars: New York University

Part II: Management 101
5. The Dead Hand of Precedent: New York Law School
6. Kafka Was an Optimist: The University of Southern California and the University of Michigan
7. Mr. Jefferson's "Private" College: Darden Graduate School of Business Administration, University of Virginia

Part III: Virtual Worlds
8. Rebel Alliance: The Classics Departments of Sixteen Southern Liberal Arts Colleges
9. The Market in Ideas: Columbia University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
10. The British Are Coming-and Going: Open University

Part IV: The Smart Money
11. A Good Deal of Collaboration: The University of California, Berkeley
12. The Information Technology Gold Rush: IT Certification Courses in Silicon Valley
13. They're All Business: DeVry University

Conclusion: The Corporation of Learning

Notes
Acknowledgments
Index



Reviews of this book:
An illuminating view of both good and bad results in a market-driven educational system.
--David Siegfried, Booklist

Reviews of this book:
Kirp has an eye for telling examples, and he captures the turmoil and transformation in higher education in readable style.
--Karen W. Arenson, New York Times

Reviews of this book:
Mr. Kirp is both quite fair and a good reporter; he has a keen eye for the important ways in which bean-counting has transformed universities, making them financially responsible and also more concerned about developing lucrative specialties than preserving the liberal arts and humanities. Shakespeare, Einstein, and the Bottom Line is one of the best education books of the year, and anyone interested in higher education will find it to be superior.
--Martin Morse Wooster, Washington Times

Reviews of this book:
There is a place for the market in higher education, Kirp believes, but only if institutions keep the market in its place...Kirp's bottom line is that the bargains universities make in pursuit of money are, inevitably, Faustian. They imperil academic freedom, the commitment to sharing knowledge, the privileging of need and merit rather than the ability to pay, and the conviction that the student/consumer is not always right.
--Glenn C. Altschuler, Philadelphia Inquirer

Reviews of this book:
David Kirp's fine new book, Shakespeare, Einstein, and the Bottom Line, lays out dozens of ways in which the ivory tower has leaned under the gravitational influence of economic pressures and the market.
--Carlos Alcal', Sacramento Bee

Reviews of this book:
The real subject of Kirp's well-researched and amply footnoted book turns out to be more than this volume's subtitle, 'the marketing of higher education.' It is, in fact, the American soul. Where will our nation be if instead of colleges transforming the brightest young people as they come of age, they focus instead on serving their paying customers and chasing the tastes they should be shaping? Where will we be without institutions that value truth more than money and intellectual creativity more than creative accounting? ...Kirp says plainly that the heart of the university is the common good. The more we can all reflect upon that common good--not our pocketbooks or retirement funds, but what is good for the general mass of men and women--the better the world of the American university will be, and the better the nation will be as well.
--Peter S. Temes, San Francisco Chronicle

Reviews of this book:
David Kirp's excellent book Shakespeare, Einstein, and the Bottom Line provides a remarkable window into the financial challenges of higher education and the crosscurrents that drive institutional decision-making...Kirp explores the continuing battle for the soul of the university: the role of the marketplace in shaping higher education, the tension between revenue generation and the historic mission of the university to advance the public good...This fine book provides a cautionary note to all in higher education. While seeking as many additional revenue streams as possible, it is important that institutions have clarity of mission and values if they are going to be able to make the case for continued public support.
--Lewis Collens, Chicago Tribune

Reviews of this book:
In this delightful book David Kirp...tells the story of markets in U.S. higher education...[It] should be read by anyone who aspires to run a university, faculty or department.
--Terence Kealey, Times Higher Education Supplement

The monastery is colliding with the market. American colleges and universities are in a fiercely competitive race for dollars and prestige. The result may have less to do with academic excellence than with clever branding and salesmanship. David Kirp offers a compelling account of what's happening to higher education, and what it means for the future.
--Robert B. Reich, University Professor, Brandeis University, and former U.S. Secretary of Labor

Can universities keep their purpose, independence, and public trust when forced to prove themselves cost-effective? In this shrewd and readable book, David Kirp explores what happens when the pursuit of truth becomes entwined with the pursuit of money. Kirp finds bright spots in unexpected places--for instance, the emerging for-profit higher education sector--and he describes how some traditional institutions balance their financial needs with their academic missions. Full of good stories and swift character sketches, Shakespeare, Einstein, and the Bottom Line is engrossing for anyone who cares about higher education.
--Laura D'Andrea Tyson, former Chair, Council of Economic Advisers

David Kirp wryly observes that "maintaining communities of scholars is not a concern of the market." His account of the state of higher education today makes it appallingly clear that the conditions necessary for the flourishing of both scholarship and community are disappearing before our eyes. One would like to think of this as a wake-up call, but the hour may already be too late.
--Stanley Fish, Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the University of Illinois at Chicago

This is, quite simply, the most deeply informed and best written recent book on the dilemma of undergraduate education in the United States. David Kirp is almost alone in stressing what relentless commercialization of higher education does to undergraduates. At the same time, he identifies places where administrators and faculty have managed to make the market work for, not against, real education. If only college and university presidents could be made to read this book!
--Stanley N. Katz, Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies, Princeton University

Once a generation a book brilliantly gives meaning to seemingly disorderly trends in higher education. David Kirp's Shakespeare, Einstein, and the Bottom Line is that book for our time [the early 21st century?]. With passion and eloquence, Kirp describes the decline of higher education as a public good, the loss of university governing authority to constituent groups and external funding sources, the two-edged sword of collaboration with the private sector, and the rise of business values in the academy. This is a must read for all who care about the future of our universities.
--Mark G. Yudof, Chancellor, The University of Texas System

David Kirp not only has a clear theoretical grasp of the economic forces that have been transforming American universities, he can write about them without putting the reader to sleep, in lively, richly detailed case studies. This is a rare book.
--Robert H. Frank, Johnson Graduate School of Management, Cornell University

David Kirp wanders America's campuses, and he wonders--are markets, management and technology supplanting vision, values and truth? With a large dose of nostalgia and a penchant for academic personalities, he ponders the struggles and synergies of Ivy and Internet, of industry and independence. Wandering and wondering with him, readers will feel the speed of change in contemporary higher education.
--Charles M. Vest, President, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
The goal for consumer oriented business should be to make a profit and to do it without costing the Earth. Yet exactly how to satisfy the needs and wants of consumers without contributing to environmental degradation is proving to be the essential, but elusive goal for businesses in the 21st century. The leading solution is to substitute material consumption with the consumption of services that offer consumers convenience and value but eliminate much of the inefficiency and waste associated with our throw-away society. Sustainable consumer services for households - services that are delivered to consumers at the premises such as home delivery of organic food, appliance leasing, mobile laundry services, internet marketing of homeservices or car pool schemes - provide a key part of the answer of how to reduce material consumption and waste while still turning a profit. Yet until now there has been little information to guide the development of such business models and practices, and to develop ways to make service-based consumption more attractive to consumers than object-ownership-based models. This book, equally a practical business handbook and business course text, provides the missing link in sustainable household service competitiveness by examining the issues, looking at business models, providing dozens of real-life best-practice examples and presenting data from the first large-scale consumer survey that explains consumer behaviour and what they want from home service provision. The book is an essential resource for businesses and public or nonprofit organizations and housing organizations entering the growing consumer services market. It provides a wealth of business know-how on what works and what doesn t, how to avoid potential pitfalls, and how to provide consumer services at the household level that are profitable, environmentally sustainable and that add to consumers quality of life.
The only book to connect the everyday world of the 20-something undergraduate consumer with sound sociological analysis of the world of consumption

Enchanting a Disenchanted World, Third Edition examines Disney, malls, cruise lines, Las Vegas, the world wide web, Planet Hollywood, credit cards, and all the other ways we now consume. Thoroughly updated to reflect the recent economic recession and the impact of the internet, bestselling author George Ritzer continues to explore this book's central thesis: that our society has undergone fundamental change because of the way and the level at which we consume.

This Third Edition demonstrates how we have created new "cathedrals" of consumption (places that enchant us so as to entice us to stay longer and consume more) while continuing to take capitalism to a new level. These places of consumption, whether in our homes, the mall, or cyberspace, are in a constant state of "enchanting the disenchanted," luring us through new spectacles because their rational qualities are both necessary and deadening at the same time.

New and Hallmark Features

Offers a unique analysis of the world of consumption, especially the settings in which consumption takes placeDiscusses the recent global economic recession throughout Offers rich details on consuming in such places as Las Vegas, Disney World, on cruise ships, in Wal-Mart, at McDonald's, and, new to this edition, on the WebIncludes a wide range of theoretical perspectives—Marxian, Weberian, critical theory, postmodern theory—as well as a number of concepts such as hyperconsumption, implosion, simulation, and time and space to show students how sociological theory can be applied to everyday phenomena
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