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Arguably the finest regimental history even written. A magnificent publication it is with its profusion of maps, illustrations and photos - each page of photos contains several. The Worcesters was one of the five regiments that had four regular battalions before the war, with two special reserve and two territorial battalions. By the end of the war another fourteen battalions had been raised for a total of twenty-two of which twelve went on active service. 9,460 officers and men gave their lives, 71 Battle Honours were awarded and eight VCs one of whom, attached to the RFC, was the airman Leefe Robinson, famous for shooting down a zeppelin. Battalions served on the Western Front, in Gallipoli, Macedonia, Mesopotamia, Italy; one battalion ended the war in North Persia. Appendices provide the Roll of Honour; Honours and Awards including Mention in Despatches, with date of Gazette (for 'Companion' of the British Empire read 'Commander'); details of Badges, Colours and Distinctions of the regiment; and the music for regimental marches. Illustrations are by well-known artists depicting battle scenes including each VC-winning action - apart from Leefe's zeppelin. After considering various factors, explained in his very informative preface, the author decided to present this history as one general story in which the number of the battalion concerned is printed in the margin of the pages dealing with its deeds. Attention is paid to minor actions such as trench raids, which usually find no place in compressed official histories; they are recorded in this history. The plans illustrate the engagements recorded in the book, and are designed to depict the part played by the several battalions in their battles and to enable the visitor to the battlefields to recognise the ground on which each fight took place, as much as to make clear the general course of those actions. The book opens with a very interesting account of the regiment in the years before the war, beginning at the turn of the century, and there is a very comprehensive index of 25 pages. This is a great piece of work and must rank as one of the finest of the Great War regimental histories, many would say the finest, and I wouldn't argue.
Brutality and fear. Heroism and sacrifice. Military history is a fascinating, complex, and often contradictory subject. War and fighting between tribes, clans, groups and countries has been with us forever. Great leaders, great villains, pivotal moments and events become transformative, causing political, social, and technological upheavals, which were often built on the foundation of war. The Handy Military History Answer Book is a captivating, concise, and convenient look at how the world, the United States, and the lives we lead today have been changed by war and the military. The weapons, leaders, soldiers, battles, tactics, strategies, blunders, technologies, and outcomes are all examined in this powerful primer on the military, its history—and world history.

From early Greeks and Romans to Genghis Kahn and other great conquering militaries of the past, continuing on through the civil wars and world wars that shaped the boundaries of today’s nations, and to the modern weapons, technologies, guerrilla warfare, and terrorism currently reported in the nightly news, this book investigates everything from the smallest miscalculations and maneuvers to the biggest invasions and battles, as well as the cutting-edge technologies and firepower that led to victories and helped change the world.

The Handy Military History Answer Book looks at the who, the what, the why, and the how of conflicts throughout history. It answers over 1,100 questions, from the mostly widely asked to the more obscure, such as:

Who cast the first stone (of human history)?
Who were the "Sea Peoples?"
Is there anything to the story of Ancient Troy?
Could Alexander the Great have conquered the early Roman Republic?
How wealthy would each of Alexander's men been had the treasure at Persepolis been divided?
How many Romans lost their lives at the Battle of Cannae?
Why did people underestimate Julius Caesar when he was in his thirties?
How many men, and auxiliary fighters, were there in a Roman legion?
Was the Battle of Actium truly decisive? And what way?
Which precious metal did the Vikings prefer above all others?
Do we even have his name--Genghis Khan--right?
Who employed the composite bow with greater effectiveness: the Arabs or the Turks?
Why did Pope Urban II go to central France in 1095?
Where did Richard the Lion-Heart get his nickname?
Why on earth did Hitler code-name his invasion of Russia for a German emperor who drowned?
Who was the greater wit: Voltaire or King Frederick the Great?
About whom did King George II remark: "Mad, is he? Well I hope he bites some of my other generals?"
What great poet spent years gathering food and wine for the Spanish Armada?
What was the price for King Francis' freedom, in 1526?
How long did it take to learn how to use the longbow?
What was the largest of the cannon brought by the Ottoman Turks to the siege of Constantinople
Who took over when Genghis Khan died (after a fall from his horse)?
What did the Franciscan monks say when they returned from Karakorum?
Was Napoleon really not French?
Who won the Battle of the Nile, and how?
Where was the world's first submarine deployed?
When did George Washington have to alter all his plans: and how did he go about making the change?
How many people died at the Siege of Fort Sumter?
What was the worst day of the Civil War, in the Far West?
When were balloons first deployed in warfare?
Where did the name "Uncle Sam" come from?
What signals did Paul Revere watch for on the evening of April 18, 1775?
What did Rasputin have to say about the approach of the First World War?
How close did Hitler come to victory at Moscow in 1941?
What ten days decided the outcome of World War II?
What was so special about the B-24?
When did the Cold War commence?
What was the last action of the Yom Kippur War?
What role did Colin Powell play in the run-up to war in Iraq?
This volume looks at current and emerging technologies of war and some of the ethical issues surrounding their use. Although the nature and politics of war never change, the weapons and technologies used in war do change and are always undergoing development. Because of that, the arsenal of weapons for twenty-first century conflict is different from previous centuries. Weapons in today’s world include an array of instruments of war that include, robotics, cyber war capabilities, human performance enhancement for warriors, and the proliferation of an entire spectrum of unmanned weapons systems and platforms. Tactical weapons now have the potential of strategic results and have changed the understanding of the battle space creating ethical, legal, and political issues unknown in the pre-9/11 world. What do these technologies mean for things such as contemporary international relations, the just-war tradition, and civil-military relations?

Directed at readers in the academic, scientific, military, and public policy communities, this volume offers current thought on ethics and emerging technologies from internationally-recognized scholars addressing the full spectrum of issues in present warfare technology. It includes current and ongoing topics of multi-discipline and international interest, such as ethics, law, international relations, war studies, public policy, science and technology.

This book was originally published in various issues and volumes of the Journal of Military Ethics.

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