More related to mass media

Any quotation dictionary that includes an entry for "education" provides ample testimony that education is more than schools. From Aristotle to Oscar Wilde come warnings that education is no substitute for experience. Indeed, for some critics of schooling, we learn that formal education is antithetical to learning. "America's Schools and the Mass Media "collectively explore the contents of mass media and how it shapes educational programming and policy-making. The editors claim that American schooling for the past forty years has less to do with a learning agenda and pedagogy than with economic competition and national security.

The editors and contributors to this important volume contend that American public schooling has historical roots as a crucible for democratic government. This ideal has not only grown increasingly suspect in recent years, but is now commonly assailed as a brake on both economic growth and intellectual excellence. The editors ask what minimum skills and knowledge one must possess in order to participate in the life of the nation, if not in the life of the mind. The essays by Gerald Grant, Bella Rosenberg, Charles T. Salmon, Joan Richardson, and Susan Tifft take direct aim at this issue, with surprising, but stimulating results.

The volume begins with Myron Lieberman's "law" to wit, the "more important an educational question, the less people know about it." The remainder of the contributions aim Jo begin removing this law with a more salutary understanding. The twelve essays that constitute the work deal with the interplay of educational and media institutions; what students learn and how they learn it--with a special emphasis on the long and questionable history of corporate, special interest and government attempts to shape the beliefs of future citizens and present consumers. The volume closes with a full scale effort to review the nation's educational priorities, and how questions of school choice are entwined with those of media choice.

For over a decade the "Media Studies Journal "has joined in the debate about the media and proposed solutions to problems that divide the media and the public. Its contributions by leading figures in print and other media have helped better professional, scholarly, and public understanding of the media's role in society. During this time, the world has experienced vast changes, with the end of the cold war and the rise of democracies and market economies almost every where--conditions that have generally benefited freedom of expression. "Media and Public Life "is a retrospective of ten years of some of the most arresting published work derived from the "Media Studies Journal."

Some of the journal's most enduring essays appear in this volume. Among them are: "How Vast the Wasteland Now?" by Newton N. Minow; "In the South--When It Mattered to Be an Editor" by Dudley Clendinen; "Seething in Silence--News in Black and White" by Ellis Cose; "Requiem for the Boys on the Bus" by Maureen Dowd; "The Flickering Images That May Drive Presidents" by Robert MacNeil; and "The Inevitable Global Conversation" by Walter B. Wriston.

"Media and Public Life "reflects the diversity of issues and perspectives that has been a trademark of the "Media Studies Journal. "The chapters aptly depict the growing field of communication and media studies. Many ideas are taken into consideration, including the great functions of communication (like information, opinion, entertainment, and publicity), trends (such as news in the post-cold war period), and specific industries (such as radio and book publishing). Throughout the book the consequences and impact of media institutions on society and public life are maintained. "Media and Public Life "will be of value to communications specialists, media studies scholars, and sociologists.

Those of us on the lookout for insights into social behavior must be impressed when a book strikes us as being powerful enough to shake firmly held beliefs in a single reading. Even as we explore the vagueness of social science, we unveil bias that prejudices how we think, what we teach. One bias in the social sciences derives from the influence of `cognitive dissonance' invoking thoughts of message reinforcement, not opinion change, and suggesting minimal effects of the press. Author David Fan goes far in dissuading those of us who have fallen under the minimalist spell. His clear examination of the power of the American press on public opinion provides compelling evidence for the profound impact the press has on our thinking. Fan, a cellular biologist, parades an impressive array of data to support his contention that opinion can be measured by the application of his mathematical model to the content of national news reports. His findings confirm a clear connection between the content of national news and the results of national opinion polls. Public Relations Review

This incisive examination of the power of information in society uses a new mathematical model, ideodynamics, to describe social responses to information and suggests that public opinion can be swayed in a predictable fashion by messages acting on the populace. In addition to mathematical modeling, this book also introduces a new method for computer content analysis able to score text for its support of different viewpoints. The method is highly flexible and adaptable, yielding great precision for any topic in any language. Although previous work has indicated that the press is able to set the agenda with regard to public opinion, this book is unique in demonstating that the press also is able to mold opinion within that agenda. Fan begins with a presentation of ideodynamics followed by an examination of the ability of the mathematical model to incorporate previous theories. He then considers data applications and discusses the conclusions to be drawn from the work. The empirical testing uses the ideodynamic equations and scores from the text analysis to predict time trends of public opinion which correspond strikingly well with actual poll measurements.

In every field of mass communications—advertising, entertainment studies, journalism, public relations, radio-television-film, tourism, and visual reporting—professionals understand the importance of storytelling. Regardless of whether the finished product is a commercial, an in-depth investigative piece, a public service campaign, an independent documentary, a travelogue, or a collection of photographs, effective storytelling requires a combination of creativity, empathy, and expertise. Through the innovative technologies and techniques described in this textbook, students will learn how to turn passive readers and viewers into engaged and regular users.

The sixteen chapters each include a brief introduction, assignments, simple-to-follow step-by-step exercises, and sources for additional information in which users will learn to produce apps, informational graphics, quick response codes, quizzes, simulations, smartphone and table icons, social media campaigns, three-dimensional pictures, and video. Students will work with the following programs: Blogger, Dreamweaver, Excel, Facebook, GeoCommons, Google Maps, Illustrator, Imgur, iMovie, Infogram, iShowU, JavaScript, JustGive, Kaywa, Kickstarter, LinkedIn, Onvert, Photoshop, Pixel Resort, QuickTime, Reddit, Second Life, SurveyMonkey, TheAppBuilder, Twitter, Vizualize, Wikipedia, Word, WordPress, and YouTube.

When digital innovations are added to traditional print and screen presentations, a media user is not only allowed to interact with the information but can also physically engage with the story displayed. Giving students the tools they need to transform their storytelling in this manner is the ultimate goal of this textbook.

In this lively and yet scholarly book, creative artists, people who direct channels of communications, and social scientists present their numerous positions and deeply felt disagreements. Originally released thirty years ago under the rubric "Culture for the Millions, "the work discusses whether or not American culture is in a state of rise or decline; whether mass media dilutes the arts or provides more art for more people; whether cultural leaders are in touch with their audiences, and other such issues.

This volume brings together outstanding artists, scholars, and media executives who present their wide-ranging and deeply felt positions and disagreements. "Mass Media in Modern Society "remains a classic, not only for what it represents as a historical document, but also because of the centrality of its discussions about the nature of cultural participation and aesthetics hi modern society.

The contributions include: Paul F. Lazarsfeld, "Mass Culture Today," Edward Shils, "Mass Society and Its Culture," Leo Lowenthal, "A Historical Preface to the Popular Culture" Debate," Hannah Arendt, "Society and Culture," Ernest van den Haag, "A Dissent from the Consensual Society," Oscar Handlin, "Comments on Mass and Popular Culture," Leo Rosten, "The Intellectual and the Mass Media," Frank Stanton, "Parallel Paths," James Johnson Sweeney, "The Artist and the Museum hi a Modern Society," Randall Jarrell, "A Sad Heart at the Supermarket," Arthur Asa Berger, "Notes on the Plight of the American Composer," James Baldwin, "Mass Culture and the Creative Artist," Stanley Edgar Hyman, "Ideals, Dangers, and Limitations of Mass Culture," H. Stewart Hughes, "Mass Culture and Social Criticism," Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., "Notes on a National Cultural Policy."

Beautifully written and class tested, Exploring Mass Media for a Changing World provides a comprehensive but modestly priced text around which instructors can develop a customized teaching package. Written for introductory courses, it covers essential information students need in order to understand the media, the mass communication process, and the role of media in society. It summarizes basic, generally agreed-upon principles, theories, significant historical events, and essential facts, but does so in a tightly written, readable style. Taken together, this information can be thought of as a minimum repertoire that all citizens of the "information age" need in order to become literate consumers and users of mass communication.

Features include:
*Historical Framework--For ease of comprehension, media processes and individual media are placed in historical context to show their technological evolution and the effects of those changes on society.
*Organization--The first seven chapters deal with the evolution of communication theories and processes common to all media. The next five deal with specific media in the chronological order in which they became mass media. Chapters 13 and 14 introduce two non-media institutions (advertising and public relations) whose exploration is essential in order to understand how mass media functions in our society. Finally, chapter 15 returns to the theme of technological evolution and its effects on society with an in-depth discussion of the internet.
*Flexibility--Because it is concise, affordable, and comprehensive, it can be used either as a stand-alone text in mass media courses or as part of an instructional package in courses where mass communication is one of several major units.
*Themes--The following themes are introduced early and carried throughout: (a) the evolution of media technology and its effects on society, (b) the global and culture-bound characteristics of mass media, and (c) the need for media literacy in the 21st century.
*Supplements--An accompanying instructor's manual begins with a chapter-length essay on teaching the mass media course then offers the following items for each chapter: topical outline and key vocabulary; key ideas to be emphasized and pitfalls to be avoided; discussion questions; objective and essay test items; and both print and nonprint resources for further study.
Global Writing for Public Relations: Connecting in English with Stakeholders and Publics Worldwide provides multiple resources to help students and public relations practitioners learn best practices for writing in English to communicate and connect with a global marketplace. Author Arhlene Flowers has created a new approach on writing for public relations by combining intercultural communication, international public relations, and effective public relations writing techniques.

Global Writing for Public Relations offers the following features:

Insight into the evolution of English-language communication in business and public relations, as well as theoretical and political debates on global English and globalization;

An understanding of both a global thematic and customized local approach in creating public relations campaigns and written materials;

Strategic questions to help writers develop critical thinking skills and understand how to create meaningful communications materials for specific audiences;

Storytelling skills that help writers craft compelling content;

Real-world global examples from diverse industries that illustrate creative solutions;

Step-by-step guidance on writing public relations materials with easy-to-follow templates to reach traditional and online media, consumers, and businesses;

Self-evaluation and creative thinking exercises to improve cultural literacy, grammar, punctuation, and editing skills for enhanced clarity; and

Supplemental online resources for educators and students.

English is the go-to business language across the world, and this book combines the author’s experience training students and seasoned professionals in crafting public relations materials that resonate with global English-language audiences. It will help public relations students and practitioners become proficient and sophisticated writers with the ability to connect with diverse audiences worldwide.

Throughout history the media has primarily been produced by adults, for adults, about adults. Increasingly, children have become a matter of high priority in the modern media society, and as they have, they have also become the subject of much concern. From debates in Congress about the detrimental effects of movies, comic books, and video games over the last century to efforts to court children as media consumers, there is a clear recognition that the media are not now and probably never were purely adult fare. Their impact on children is at issue.

The contributors to this important work all study or work in the world of children's media. They analyze such concerns as the need for more educational programming for children on commercial television, media research groups devoted to studying issues that affect children, how children are covered by major newspapers and network news, and media organizations that utilize children as reporters, journalists, and editors. Also included in this volume are insights from various members of the entertainment, scholarly, and political communities, including Senator Paul Simon, Harvard professor Gerald Lesser, television personality Fred Rogers, and Representative Patricia Schroeder.

"Children and the Media "goes beyond predictable debates over children and media. The contributors consider various interest goups, from consumer to producer, with the intention of stimulating more disciplined intelligence on the topic, thus leading to continuing creative efforts to address an often neglected part of the human community. This book will be invaluable to media studies specialists, child psychologists, educators, and parents.

With the increasing use and penetration of digital information technologies throughout its processes and products, the publishing industry is undergoing a fundamental and irreversible transformation. Provided here is a comprehensive single-volume study of that transformation which demonstrates how publishing managers can best take advantage of the opportunities the profound changes will bring. In 15 clearly-written chapters, the seven key elements of publishing, the 7M's, are detailed. An enumeration of critical core concepts and over 30 figures and tables assist in this timely analysis that is essential reading for all stakeholders in the future of publishing.

This eloquent and masterful book details how the recent advancements in digital information technology mark a fundamental and irreversible transformation in the publishing industry. The clearly presented and highly readable text provides a much-needed, concise, easy-to-grasp introduction to this new world of digital publishing, the opportunities it presents, and what it means for managers in the industry, including the fundamental shift from format-based enterprises (e.g., book publishers) to firms that are developers and managers of intellectual properties in multiple forms which best meet their customers' information needs. Throughout the study, the author, a media executive who has held managerial positions in major book publishing, cable television, and software firms, focuses on the business strategies that both traditional print-based and new media publishing firms must implement to adapt and thrive in this rapidly evolving and complex environment.

After an introductory chapter that reviews the major symptoms of change in the current publishing industry environment, the author examines the Information Age and the new information industry as the foundation for his analysis. He then presents his new framework, the seven Ms of publishing, that serves both as the structural backbone and main thesis of the study. The central 11 chapters of the book detail these seven Ms: the five value-added Ms of Material, Mode, Media, Means, and Market; and the two infrastructural Ms of Management and Money. The author supports his analysis with over 30 figures and tables that vividly depict the key points of the study. He also delineates 45 core concepts of publishing in the Information Age within the seven Ms. The final chapter of the book presents the author's vision of the digital publishing enterprise and the paradigm of promise for managers and other stakeholders in the future of publishing.

Taking advantage of electronic information bases, Altheide, whose previous interpretive studies of the mass media are well known, uses a "tracking discourse" method to show how the nature and use of the word "fear" by mass media have changed over the years. His analysis examines how some of the topics associated with fear (e.g., AIDS, crime, immigrants, race, sexuality, schools, children) have shifted in emphasis, and how certain news organizations and social institutions benefit from the exploitation of fear.

This book is about fear and its expanding place in our public life. The author documents the rise of a "discourse of fear" in the present era: the pervasive communication, sym­bolic awareness, and expectation that danger and risk surround us. Altheide offers explanations of how this occurred and suggests some of its serious social consequences. In doing so, he focuses on the nature and use of social power and social control. The mass media play a significant role in shaping social definitions that govern social action. Relatedly, his methodological and theoretical foundation in classical social theory, existential-phenomenology, ethnomethodology, and symbolic interactionism leads him to view social power as the capacity to define situations for self and others.

Creating Fear is focused on sorting out the ways that the mass media and popular culture help define social situa­tions. It helps understand the nature, process, and organiza­tion of mass media operations, including news procedures, perspectives, and formats. It recognizes the need to expand our methodological frameworks to incorporate new infor­mation technologies and databases and to ask different ques­tions. This volume, which attempts to break the circle of fear discourse, will be of interest to sociologists, communi­cations scholars, and criminologists.

This exceptional new text offers an up-to-date and integrated approach to communication law. Written by two practicing attorneys with extensive experience teaching the communication law course, Law for Advertising, Broadcasting, Journalism, and Public Relations covers the areas of communication law essential and most relevant for readers throughout the communication curriculum. Its integrated approach will serve students and practitioners in advertising and public relations as well as those in journalism and electronic media.

Providing background to help readers understand legal concepts, this comprehensive communication law text includes an introduction to the legal system; covers legal procedures, structures, and jurisdictions; discusses the First Amendment and electronic media regulations; and considers issues of access. Additional material includes: *intellectual property law; *employment and agency law, with explanations of how these laws create obligations for mass communication professionals and their employees; *commercial communication laws; and *special laws and regulations that impact reporters, public relations practitioners, and advertisers who deal with stock sales.

Special features of this text include:
*Magic Words and Phrases--defining legal terms;
*Cases--illustrating key points in each chapter;
*Practice Notes--highlighting points of particular interest to professional media practices;
*Instructions on finding and briefing cases, with a sample brief; and
*Examples of legal documents and jury instructions.

This text is intended as an introduction to communication law for students and practitioners in mass communication, journalism, advertising, broadcasting, telecommunications, and public relations.
©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.