More featuring true crime

"At first, you think it's just the telling of a love story. Of two people finding each other, after having known each other for years, and getting together. That in itself was lovely.
Then all of a sudden, things turn dark. And, you almost can't believe what's about to happen and if it will actually happen. No spoilers here, of course! This book was pretty quick paced, held your interest, and kept you flipping those pages til it was finished. Not to mention, it had great character development. I'm looking forward to seeing what else this author has to offer." Darlene on Goodreads
Synopsis: Marina, a 38-year-old accountant in a crumbling relationship, falls in love with a charming colleague who is married with a son. The two begin a torrid relationship. One commits a murder. Oscar, a homicide detective, is assigned to the case. He is a man dedicated to his work and to his family, and he likes to joke about and mock the typical American police series. Excerpt: “You know, Marina, I have worked in this profession for a long time, and I know that sometimes we think that the only solution is for someone to disappear, a mere accident, a murder, and, even though we know this idea is stupid and crazy, we are unable to see anything beyond that. It’s just like insects with light. On a summer’s night, we can watch these insects drawn to the light again and again. The insects know it will lead them nowhere – in fact, they can even get burnt and die – but it’s their nature. I think it’s called phototaxis, the internal substance that makes them attracted to the light. But I’m not sure; I’m no expert on animal fauna. But the point is that we humans also become obsessed when we cannot find a solution. We find ourselves in the deepest darkness, and when we see a light, even though we know that this light is a mirage, an illusion that will only harm us, we cannot stop thinking about it, and no matter h
A crime reporter’s thrilling account of the infamous 2015 prison break, manhunt, and capture based on interviews with one of the inmates who pulled it off.
 
On June 6, 2015, inmates Richard Matt and David Sweat escaped from Clinton Correctional Facility, New York State’s largest maximum-security prison. The media was instantly obsessed with the story: Aided by a prison seamstress, who smuggled hacksaw blades, chisels, and drill bits inside the facility via a vat of raw hamburger meat, the two convicted murderers sliced their way through steel cell walls, navigated a maze of tunnels, climbed out of a manhole, and walked off into the night.
 
After nearly three weeks on the run, US Customs and Border Patrol agent Chris Voss shot and killed Matt on June 26, 2015. Two days later, New York State Police Sgt. Jay Cook shot Sweat twice in the back. He survived. While some details of this elaborate modern-day prison break have come to light, only one reporter has spoken directly to Sweat. In Wild Escape, he answers the most important question in the case: Of all the inmates who dream of escape, why was he the one who could make it happen?
 
“The details Marcius has amassed are comprehensive and stunning and serve to heighten the impact of her story. This is first-rate journalism, written about a crime and a criminal from the inside out.” —Stephen Singular, New York Times–bestselling author of Talked to Death
 
“Marcius writes with genuine narrative power. Her depth of research provides insights into this historical escape that we can’t get anywhere else.” —Anthony Flacco, New York Times and international bestselling author of The Road Out of Hell
#1 New York Times bestselling author and queen of true crime Ann Rule’s sixteenth volume in her True Crime Files series, Deadly Neighbors delves into the unsolved case of a billionaire’s son mysteriously falling off a balcony to his death and more.

In July 2011, billionaire Jonah Shacknai’s Coronado, California, mansion was the setting for two horrifying deaths only days apart—his young son’s plunge from a balcony and his girlfriend’s ghastly hanging. What really happened? Baffling questions remain unanswered, as these cases were closed far too soon for hundreds of people; Rule looks at them now through the eyes of a relentless crime reporter. The second probe began in Utah when Susan Powell vanished in a 2009 blizzard. Her controlling husband, Josh, proved capable of a blind rage that was heartbreakingly fatal to his innocent small sons almost three years later in a tragedy that shocked America as the details unfolded. If anyone had detected the depth of depravity within Josh Powell, perhaps the family that loved and trusted him would have been saved. In these and seven other riveting cases, Ann Rule exposes the twisted truth behind the façades of Fatal Friends, Deadly Neighbors.

These doomed relationships are the focus of queen of true crime Ann Rule’s sixteenth all-new Crime Files collection. In these shattering inside views of both headlined and little-known homicides, Rule speaks for vulnerable victims who relied on the wrong people. She begins with two startling novella-length investigations.
In a motel room on the east side of the city, a little girl is brutally murdered by her mothers sadistic boyfriend for failing to know her ABCs. The family disappears, along with the childs body, and the scene of the crime spans over 1,000 miles. Despite the lack of a body, the detectives of the 1020 Squad obtain a conviction but it will take another eight long years before the little girls remains come home to rest. In a twist of fate, the 1020 Squad no sooner closes the final chapters of this case when the headless body of a tiny girl is found discarded in a makeshift dump site in the woods Sgt. David Bernard and the 1020 Squad will work over four years, following 1,500 leads and conducting the single largest area canvass in the history of the Kansas City, Missouri Police Department before finding the true identity of the seemingly orphaned little girl known only as Precious Doe. Through the Rain is a candid and touching account of the painful impact that these brutal murders had on Sgt. Bernard, his family and the KCPDs 1020 squad. It chronicles the all too frequent stories of child abuse, failed social services, a flawed court system, and battered women who sacrificed their own children to shield their abusive lovers, echoing the same preposterous explanations of but I love him. It is the story of a family, a group of committed volunteers and a community who reached out to embrace Angel Lea Hart and Erica Michelle Marie Green aka Precious Doe and give them in death the humanity and affection they so desperately deserved in life.
Every small town has a moment when the real world abruptly intrudes, shattering the town's notions of itself and its people. For citizens of Marshall, Michigan, that moment came August 18, 1967. Nola Puyear was working downtown at the Tasty Cafe that morning when she received a package. She opened it and was instantly killed in a fiery explosion.

In the months that followed, law enforcement and prosecutors wrestled with a crime that to all appearances was senseless. Evidence recovered from the blown-up restaurant, including a bottle of pills that had been tainted with lye, suggested a concerted plot to murder Mrs. Puyear. But why had someone wanted to kill the well-liked woman, by all accounts a pillar of her close-knit community? For that matter, was Marshall really the quaint paradise it seemed to be?

Secret Witness brings to light startling new evidence and freshly uncovered facts to address these and other questions that, to this day, surround one of Michigan's most brutal murders. Based on extensive interviews with surviving prosecutors, police, and witnesses, Blaine Pardoe re-creates the investigation that pried into Marshall's dark underbelly and uncovered the seamy private lives led by some of the town's citizenry but led to only tenuous theories about the bombing. The book also examines the pivotal role played by the Secret Witness program, an initiative by the Detroit News that offered rewards for anonymous tips related to violent crimes. What's ultimately revealed is the true depth of evil that occurred in Marshall that day. Every small town has dirty little secrets. This time, they were deadly.

She is a petite, innocent-looking young woman with fantasies of skinning and flaying human skin. He is a diagnosed schizophrenic who fantasises about committing cold-blooded murder. When they meet, they will plan and execute one of the most horrific crimes ever documented in this country. In April 2011, the sleepy gold-mining town of Welkom was deeply shocked when the dismembered, decapitated body of Michael van Eck was discovered buried in a shallow grave on the outskirts of the local cemetery. Was this a muti murder, the work of a deranged madman or part of a satanic ritual? For the investigators and psychologists involved, the mystery only deepened when a seemingly unlikely arrest was made: a soft-spoken girl next door and her intelligent, devoted fiancé. Joining forces with some of the country’s most specialised experts in the occult and psychopathy, Lieutenant Ogies Nel of the Welkom Detective Unit and her colleagues in the South African Police Service unravelled one of the most brutal psychologically motivated murders ever committed in South Africa’s crime history. As they uncovered the evidence, they exposed a most heinous deed, alarmingly similar to the crimes committed by serial killer Ed Gein, who had a preference for flaying his victims’ skin. Grave Murder is the chilling account of how appearances can be very deceptive – how those who might seem innocent and harmless on the outside may hide some dark, disturbing secrets that are just waiting to be revealed.
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