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Current Therapy in Medicine of Australian Mammals provides an update on Australian mammal medicine. Although much of the companion volume, Medicine of Australian Mammals, is still relevant and current, there have been significant advances in Australian mammal medicine and surgery since its publication in 2008. The two texts together remain the most comprehensive source of information available in this field. This volume is divided into two sections. The first includes comprehensive chapters on general topics and topics relevant to multiple taxa. Several new topics are presented including: wildlife health in Australia and the important role veterinarians play in Australia’s biosecurity systems; medical aspects of native mammal reintroductions and translocations; disease risk analysis; wildlife rehabilitation practices in Australia with an emphasis on welfare of animals undergoing rehabilitation; management of overabundant populations; immunology; and stress physiology. The second section provides updates on current knowledge relevant to specific taxa. Several appendices provide useful reference data and information on clinical reference ranges, recommended venipuncture sites, chemical restraint agent doses and regimens, a drug formulary and dental charts. Written by Australian experts, Current Therapy in Medicine of Australian Mammals is clinically oriented, with emphasis on practical content with easy-to-use reference material. It is a must-have for veterinarians, students, biologists, zoologists and wildlife carers and other wildlife professionals. This volume also complements, updates and utilises the resources of other books such as Radiology of Australian Mammals (Vogelnest and Allan 2015), Pathology of Australian Native Wildlife (Ladds 2009), Haematology of Australian Mammals (Clark 2004) and Australian Mammals: Biology and Captive Management (Jackson 2003), all CSIRO Publishing publications.
Interest in the conservation and welfare of Australian native wildlife continues to grow. Veterinarians are frequently presented with injured, diseased or orphaned animals and there is increasing veterinary involvement in conservation programs. In Australia and overseas, Australian mammals are used in research, kept as pets and are popular display and education animals in zoos and fauna parks. The recognition, diagnosis and treatment of injury and disease in wildlife species present unique challenges for the veterinarian. Radiology is a fundamental diagnostic tool that can be used to further define the nature and extent of injury or disease, guide therapeutic decisions and determine prognosis. An essential aspect of radiology is the recognition and description of abnormal findings. In order to recognise abnormalities, knowledge of normal radioanatomy is necessary. Radiology of Australian Mammals provides a detailed reference on the normal radioanatomy of Australian mammals. A chapter on radiographic technique covers digital radiography of small species, and restraint and positioning to obtain diagnostic images. This is followed by chapters covering the normal radioanatomy of the short-beaked echidna, platypus, macropods, koala, wombats, dasyurids, possums and gliders, bandicoots and the bilby, and bats. Each chapter includes a detailed description of anatomy relevant to radiography and multiple images of normal radiographs with outlines and annotations identifying relevant structures. A chapter on dental radiology discusses and demonstrates normal dental radioanatomy. The final chapter includes selected radiographic pathology case studies providing an appreciation of radiographic findings seen in some common diseases of Australian mammals. A checklist of the mammals of Australia and its territories and a glossary of abbreviations and terms used for annotation of images complete the volume.
The Action Plan for Australian Mammals 2012 is the first review to assess the conservation status of all Australian mammals. It complements The Action Plan for Australian Birds 2010 (Garnett et al. 2011, CSIRO Publishing), and although the number of Australian mammal taxa is marginally fewer than for birds, the proportion of endemic, extinct and threatened mammal taxa is far greater. These authoritative reviews represent an important foundation for understanding the current status, fate and future of the nature of Australia. This book considers all species and subspecies of Australian mammals, including those of external territories and territorial seas. For all the mammal taxa (about 300 species and subspecies) considered Extinct, Threatened, Near Threatened or Data Deficient, the size and trend of their population is presented along with information on geographic range and trend, and relevant biological and ecological data. The book also presents the current conservation status of each taxon under Australian legislation, what additional information is needed for managers, and the required management actions. Recovery plans, where they exist, are evaluated. The voluntary participation of more than 200 mammal experts has ensured that the conservation status and information are as accurate as possible, and allowed considerable unpublished data to be included. All accounts include maps based on the latest data from Australian state and territory agencies, from published scientific literature and other sources. The Action Plan concludes that 29 Australian mammal species have become extinct and 63 species are threatened and require urgent conservation action. However, it also shows that, where guided by sound knowledge, management capability and resourcing, and longer-term commitment, there have been some notable conservation success stories, and the conservation status of some species has greatly improved over the past few decades. The Action Plan for Australian Mammals 2012 makes a major contribution to the conservation of a wonderful legacy that is a significant part of Australia’s heritage. For such a legacy to endure, our society must be more aware of and empathetic with our distinctively Australian environment, and particularly its marvellous mammal fauna; relevant information must be readily accessible; environmental policy and law must be based on sound evidence; those with responsibility for environmental management must be aware of what priority actions they should take; the urgency for action (and consequences of inaction) must be clear; and the opportunity for hope and success must be recognised. It is in this spirit that this account is offered.
The world's gliding mammals are an extraordinary group of animals that have the ability to glide from tree to tree with seemingly effortless grace. There are more than 60 species of gliding mammals including the flying squirrels from Asia, Europe and North America, the scaly-tailed flying squirrels from central Africa and the gliding possums of Australia and New Guinea. But the most spectacular of all are the colugos – or so called flying lemurs – that occur throughout South-East Asia and the Philippines. Animals that glide from tree to tree descend at an angle of less than 45 degrees to the horizontal, while those that parachute descend at an angle greater than 45 degrees. Gliding is achieved by deflecting air flowing past well-developed gliding membranes, or patagia, which form an effective airfoil that allows the animal to travel the greatest possible horizontal distance with the least loss in height. The flying squirrels and scaly-tailed flying squirrels even have special cartilaginous spurs that extend either from the wrist or elbow, respectively, to help support the gliding membrane. Gliding Mammals of the World provides, for the first time, a synthesis of all that is known about the biology of these intriguing mammals. It includes a brief description of each species, together with a distribution map and a beautiful full-colour painting. An introduction outlines the origins and biogeography of each group of gliding mammals and examines the incredible adaptations that allow them to launch themselves and glide from tree to tree.
Meet Greg. He’s a stocky guy with an outsized swagger. He’s been the intimidating yet sociable don of his posse of friends—including Abe, Keith, Mike, Kevin, Torn Trunk, and Willie. But one arid summer the tide begins to shift and the third-ranking Kevin starts to get ambitious, seeking a higher position within this social club. But this is no ordinary tale of gangland betrayal—Greg and his entourage are bull elephants in Etosha National Park, Namibia, where, for the last twenty-three years, Caitlin O’Connell has been a keen observer of their complicated friendships.

In Elephant Don, O’Connell, one of the leading experts on elephant communication and social behavior, offers a rare inside look at the social world of African male elephants. Elephant Don tracks Greg and his group of bulls as O’Connell tries to understand the vicissitudes of male friendship, power struggles, and play. A frequently heart-wrenching portrayal of commitment, loyalty, and affection between individuals yearning for companionship, it vividly captures an incredible repertoire of elephant behavior and communication. Greg, O’Connell shows, is sometimes a tyrant and other times a benevolent dictator as he attempts to hold onto his position at the top. Though Elephant Don is Greg’s story, it is also the story of O’Connell and the challenges and triumphs of field research in environs more hospitable to lions and snakes than scientists.

Readers will be drawn into dramatic tales of an elephant society at once exotic and surprisingly familiar, as O’Connell’s decades of close research reveal extraordinary discoveries about a male society not wholly unlike our own. Surely we’ve all known a Greg or two, and through this book we may come to know them in a whole new light.
From a modest beginning in the form of a little shrew-like, nocturnal, insect eating ancestor that lived 200 million years ago, mammals evolved into the huge variety of different kinds of animals we see today. Many species are still small, and follow the lifestyle of the ancestor, but others have adapted to become large grazers and browsers, like the antelopes, cattle, rhinos, and elephants, or the lions, hyaenas, and wolves that prey upon them. Yet others evolved to be specialist termite eaters able to dig into the hardest mounds, or tunnel creating burrowers, and a few took to the skies as gliders and the bats. Many live partly in the water, such as otters, beavers, and hippos, while whales and dugongs remain permanently in the seas, incapable of ever emerging onto land. In this Very Short Introduction T. S. Kemp explains how it is a tenfold increase in metabolic rate - endothermy or "warm-bloodedness" - that lies behind the high levels of activity, and the relatively huge brain associated with complex, adaptable behaviour that epitomizes mammals. He describes the remarkable fossil record, revealing how and when the mammals gained their characteristics, and the tortuous course of their subsequent evolution, during which many bizarre forms such as sabre-toothed cats, and 30-tonne, 6-m high browsers arose and disappeared. Describing the wonderful adaptations that mammals evolved to suit their varied modes of life, he also looks at those of the mainly arboreal primates that culminated ultimately in Homo sapiens. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.
While observing a family group of elephants in the wild, Caitlin O'Connell, a young field scientist, noticed a peculiar listening behavior. A matriarch she had been watching for months turned her massive head and lifted her foot off the ground. As she scanned the horizon, the other elephants followed suit, all facing the same direction. O'Connell soon made a groundbreaking discovery: the elephants were "listening through limbs," feeling the ripples of the earth's surface for approaching friends and enemies. Through their feet, toenails, trunks, and other, subtler modes of communication, these enormous animals were communicating to one another, demonstrating the vital importance of social relationships in their lives.

Yet this grand revelation about the intelligence of wild animals is also a story of the relationship between humans and elephants as neighbors, vying for the same resources of an increasingly crowded continent. For when O'Connell was first contracted by the Namibian government to develop new methods to deter elephants from raiding villagers' crops, she was unprepared for what she would encounter -- political upheaval, tribal disputes, inhumane poachers, and a fundamentally ineffective approach to wildlife conservation. Despite these setbacks, she came to know and love each of the fascinating, unique elephants under her watchful eye, while at the same time witnessing a change in attitude and policy, providing hope for the elephant's future.

An unforgettable journey of scientific discovery, The Elephant's Secret Sense takes you deep into the wilds of Namibia, from the tops of isolated, desert observation towers to the jaws and claws of ravenous lions to aerial expeditions and dusty highways, where the naturalists do their difficult work in a troubled land threatened by expanding human populations and unstable politics. Resonant with the powerful calls of the mysterious elephant, this is a story about the resilience of nature and the inspiring, astonishing, and often heartbreaking places where humans and wild animals come together.
Male Accessory Sex Organs: Structure and Function in Mammals investigates the salient features of subcellular structure and function of some sex hormone-dependent organs as well as the molecular hormonal mechanisms that regulate them. It describes the embryology, anatomy, and histology of the male sex accessory glands, along with hormonal regulation of fine structure, effects of nutrition on male accessory organs, and uptake and retention of androgens in these organs.
Organized into three sections comprised of 19 chapters, this book begins with an overview of the ultrastructural organization, nutritional requirements, and chief functional properties of the main sex accessory glands in males. It then discusses the molecular mechanisms of hormone action, immunological aspects and systematic abnormalities of some of these male accessory sex organs, pituitary secretion of gonadotropins, fine structural aspects of cytodifferentiation, and biochemical and functional properties related to sperm metabolism and fertility. Other chapters focus on zinc in male sex accessory organs, the role of lysosomal enzymes, the effects of androgens on DNA and RNA synthesis in sex accessory tissue, and the experimental carcinogenesis of the prostate. The book includes in vivo and in vitro studies on prostatic carcinoma and concludes with a chapter on functional and structural changes in male accessory sex organs during aging.
This book is invaluable to biomedical scientists, pathologists, and researchers interested in the biology and pathology of male accessory sex organs.
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