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to his suggestions for corrective action at government level, will naturally vary according to the interests of each government in upholding the ap proach it regards as consistent with its own basic interests and those of its international airline. I commend this book as a most valuable treatment of the subjects which are of concern not only to the academic student but also to those engaged in the study and application of international civil aviation agreements in governments and airlines. It would be fitting if it enjoys, as it should, wide circulation amongst such students and practicioners. Sir Donald Anderson Director-General of Civil Aviation Melbourne, Australia. April, 1970. TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS XI CHAPTER ONE I. The Technique of government 1 II. International civil aviation regulation 4 III. National vs international approach 9 CHAPTER Two I. International control of the air traffic market 17 II. Freedom classification and traffic data 22 III. The air traffic market and the exchange of routes and traffic rights 28 IV. The sixth freedom issue 32 V. Route specification 40 VI. Equal opportunity 46 CHAPTER THREE I. Non-scheduled and scheduled air carriers 51 II. All-cargo services 59 III. Inclusive tour traffic 63 IV. Non-inclusive tour (affinity) charter traffic 72 V. Traffic rights for charter carriers 79 CHAPTER FOUR I. Cooperative arrangements 104 II. Aircraft lease agreements in international air transp- tation 114 III. Affiliation between air carriers 120 IV.
Mr. Asamoah's book is concerned with an area of growing importance in the evolution of contemporary international law. The traditional division of the sources of International law into custom and treaties has already been supplemented in Article 38 of the Statute of the International Court of Justice by the "general principles of law re cognized by civilized nations" and-as subsidiary sources, the judicial decisions and the teachings of highly qualified publicists. But in order to cope with the diversity of international law in our time, we have to look to a far greater variety of sources of international law, and we shall have to recognize that, in accordance with the many-sided character of international law, these sources may vary greatly in intensity. In recent years, Declaratory Resolutions of the General Assembly have been much concerned with the general princi ples of international law. Sometimes these Declarations are interpre tations of the Charter and other instruments; sometimes they are evi dence of state practice and a developing customary international law ; sometimes they formulate new principles which, in some cases will eventually lead to international treaties or new custom, or in other cases will be accepted as authorative statements of international legal principles, in circumstances where a formal treaty cannot be attained. There are many reasons--often of an internal character-which prevent the conclusion of a treaty but not the acceptance of the principles contained in it.
A considerable volume of international financial business is carried on in Guernsey, a near independent jurisdiction with close constitutional links to Britain about to celebrate the 800th anniversary of its status. Guernsey law is distinct from English law, drawing on its own history and traditions as well as modern English legal principles and those of other jurisdictions. Laws of Guernsey is the first textbook of modern times to introduce the core areas of Guernsey law and court procedure. It is essential reading for the many individuals and entities with business either in Guernsey or governed by Guernsey law. It will be of particular interest and assistance to lawyers from other jurisdictions concerned with Guernsey law issues, whether litigation, succession, insurance, employment or anything else; likewise the book will assist insurers, bankers, trustees and financial services
professionals generally. The book includes a foreword written by the Bailiff of Guernsey, the Island's senior judge.

The following principal areas are introduced: Company and commercial law; trust law; income tax law; law of succession; property law; employment law; health and safety at work law; tort law; contract law; civil procedure and injunctions; criminal law and procedure; anti-money laundering legislation. The book includes various legislative materials and many cross-references to
English law in particular, likewise to French law.

Contents:
Foreword by the Bailiff of Guernsey; Acknowledgements; Abbreviations; Table of Cases; Table of Laws, Statutes and other legislative materials; Table of Orders of the Royal Court, Rules, Practice Directions etc.; Table of Bailiffs from the time of the Restoration; Introduction; 1) Sources of Guernsey Law and the Force of Precedent; 2) The Constitution of the Bailiwick of Guernsey; 3) The Review of Administrative Decisions; 4) The Housing Control and Right to Work Legislation; 5) Control of Development; 6) Family Law; 7) Guardianship (Tutelle and Curatelle); 8) Law of Trusts: The Trusts (Guernsey) Law 1989; 9) Succession Laws of the Bailiwick; 10) Income Tax; 11) Insolvency; 12) Security Interests; 13) Control of Borrowing; 14) Financial Services Regulation in the Bailiwick; 15) Guernsey Company Law; 16) Employment Law; 17) Health and Safety at Work Law; 18) Civil Courts and Procedure; 19) Injunctions, Arrêts and the Clameur de Haro; 20) Conflict of Laws; 21) Criminal Courts and Procedure; 22) Evidence in Civil and Criminal Proceedings in Guernsey; 23) Guernsey Law of Realty and Leases; 24) Guernsey Law of Tort and Contract; 25) Epilogue; Appendices; Bibliography; Index
Any talk of the advancement of international law presupposes that two objections are met. The first is the 'realist' objection which, observing the state of international relations today, claims that when it comes down to the important things in international life-war and peace, and more generally power politics among states-no real advancement has been made: international society remains a society of sovereign states deciding matters with regard solely to their own best interests and with international law all too often being no more than a thin cloak cast over the precept that 'might is right'. Against this excessive scepticism stands excessive optimism: international law is supposedly making giant strides forward thanks especially to the tremendous mass of soft law generated by international organisations over the past sixty years and more. By incautiously mixing all manner of customs, treaties, resolutions and recommendations, a picture of international law is painted that has little to do with the 'real world'.

This book is arranged into three sections. The first purports to show from the specific example of international investment law that the past half-century has seen the invention of two genuinely new techniques in positive law: state contracts and transnational arbitration without privity. This is 'advancement' in international law not because the techniques are 'good' in themselves (one may well think them 'bad') but because they have introduced legal possibilities into international law that did not exist heretofore. The second section examines the theoretical consequences of those new legal techniques and especially the way they affect the theory of the state. The third widens the field of view and asks whether European law has surpassed international law in a move towards federalism or whether it represents a step forward for international law.

These reflections make for a clearer theoretical understanding of what constitutes true advancement in international law. Such an understanding should give pause both to those who argue that hardly any progress has been made, and to those who are overly fanciful about progress.
This new edition of Nicholas Murray Butler's The International Mind marks the 100th anniversary of its publication. Widely read at the time, it has reached the status of classic work. Butler is one of the 20th Century’s most famous college presidents. He transformed Columbia University into a famous research institution of higher learning. More importantly, this work still has an important message for today’s readers: how can we establish an international mind that builds a lasting peace for the world. This work is based on Butler’s famous speeches as president of the Lake Mohonk Conferences on International Arbitration, which took place just prior to the start of World War 1. Butler was a strong proponent of judicial internationalism and education as the mechanism through which the settlement of disputes between nations could be resolved. As head of the justestablished Carnegie Endowment for International Peace’s Division of Intercourse and Education, Butler put forth his own views on international understanding. Later, Butler would become president of Carnegie’s Peace Endowment and was most responsible for helping to bring forth the 1928 KelloggBriand Pact, renouncing war as an instrument of national policy. In 1931, based on his efforts for world peace, which began at Lake Mohonk (NY), Butler shared the Nobel Peace Prize with Jane Addams. This new edition has a scholarly introduction as well as an extensive bibliographic essay on American Peace Writings by Charles F Howlett. An added feature to this new edition is a listing of Butler’s most notable works, the platforms of the 1907 & 1912 Lake Mohonk Conferences, and an lengthy 1914 interview with Butler by New York Times reporter, Edward Marshall. Readers will find the appendices an added bonus to a now classic work. This new edition of Butler’s important book will bring to light one of the early 20th century peace classics devoted to the study of international arbitration. It offers a clear and compelling argument as to the importance of internationalism as proposed by some of the more prominent educational leaders, statesmen, and jurists of the preWorld War 1 period. Most importantly, reissuing this work in its one hundredth anniversary year bears testimony to its lasting importance since Butler’s efforts and those at the Lake Mohonk Conferences on International Arbitration led to the creation of a Permanent Court of International Justice only a few years after the conclusion of the First World War.
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