More related to self-acceptance

"Mathews identifies a psychological pattern that largely goes unrecognized, but which is epidemic, and she offers sound, solid solutions. This very wise book deserves a wide reception."—Larry Dossey, MD, author of One Mind

Stop Being Good and Start Getting Real

Rediscover your true self with Letting Go of Good, an empowering guide to dismantling the false connection between being good and being worthy. While exposing the dangers of the guilt-led life, practicing psychotherapist Andrea Mathews shares innovative tools and techniques for healing, including how to understand and dialogue with emotions, develop intuition and discernment, and make decisions from a place of honest desire and compassion.

Featuring a foreword by Thomas Moore, author of Care of the Soul, this book provides the guidance you need to embrace the real, authentic you. With illuminating composite examples from Andrea's clinical experience and a powerful exploration of the pathway to healing, Letting Go of Good presents a breakthrough approach to creating genuine relationships and awakening your true self to find peace.

Praise:
"In this wonderful book, Andrea offers an important and insightful message for those seeking the next step in a life of freedom."—Jonathan Ellerby, PhD, bestselling author of Return to the Sacred

"This beautifully expressed book is a true gift for those many who feel lost or depressed about the celebration of life."—Nancy Qualls-Corbett, PhD, author of The Sacred Prostitute: Eternal Aspects of the Feminine and Awakening Woman

"Andrea Mathews not only understands the depths to which we go to remain in the human condition, but also the purity of the soul in that collaboration. Letting Go of Good: Dispel the Myth of Goodness to Find Your Genuine Self is a powerful bridge between the two, allowing the authentic self to emerge beyond the identity."—Simran Singh, life mentor, award-winning author of Conversations with the Universe, and media creator for 11:11 Magazine

Discover how the freedom of sucking at something can help you build resilience, embrace imperfection, and find joy in the pursuit rather than the goal.

What if the secret to resilience and joy is the one thing we’ve been taught to avoid?

When was the last time you tried something new? Something that won’t make you more productive, make you more money, or check anything off your to-do list? Something you’re really, really bad at, but that brought you joy?

Odds are, not recently.

As a sh*tty surfer and all-around-imperfect human Karen Rinaldi explains in this eye-opening book, we live in a time of aspirational psychoses. We humblebrag about how hard we work and we prioritize productivity over play. Even kids don’t play for the sake of playing anymore: they’re building blocks to build the ideal college application. But we’re all being had. We’re told to be the best or nothing at all. We’re trapped in an epic and farcical quest for perfection. We judge others on stuff we can’t even begin to master, and it’s all making us more anxious and depressed than ever. Worse, we’re not improving on what really matters.

This book provides the antidote. (It’s Great to) Suck at Something reveals that the key to a richer, more fulfilling life is finding something to suck at. Drawing on her personal experience sucking at surfing (a sport she’s dedicated nearly two decades of her life to doing without ever coming close to getting good at it) along with philosophy, literature, and the latest science, Rinaldi explores sucking as a lost art we must reclaim for our health and our sanity and helps us find the way to our own riotous suck-ability. She draws from sources as diverse as Anthony Bourdain and surfing luminary Jaimal Yogis, Thich Nhat Hanh, and Jean-Paul Sartre, among many others, and explains the marvelous things that happen to our mammalian brains when we try something new, all to discover what she’s learned firsthand: it is great to suck at something. Sucking at something rewires our brain in positive ways, helps us cultivate grit, and inspires us to find joy in the process, without obsessing about the destination. Ultimately, it gives you freedom: the freedom to suck without caring is revelatory.

Coupling honest, hilarious storytelling with unexpected insights, (It’s Great to) Suck at Something is an invitation to embrace our shortcomings as the very best of who we are and to open ourselves up to adventure, where we may not find what we thought we were looking for, but something way more important.
"Charge Up Your Life" is an easy-to-follow guide to discovering the real you. As you embark on a personal journey to build self-confidence and generate happiness in your life, you will find proven insights, information, and tools that help you overcome the key barriers that hold you back. Ellen M. Diana and Connie M. Leach share over fifty years of combined experience to help readers find love, happiness, and success!

About the Authors

Ellen Diana is a psychologist with thirty years' experience working with adults, children, and families in public and private schools, first as a secondary English teacher and later as school psychologist. In addition, she is a gestalt-trained individual, family, couples, and children's play therapist with 20 years as a private practitioner. Ellen has published a number of articles on educational topics in scholarly journals, and has made presentations at national conferences in psychology and education, as well as been a guest on local radio. She is a member of the American Psychological Association, the Arizona Psychological Association, and American Mensa.

Connie Leach is an author, speaker, and certified life coach who specializes in helping people realize their greatest potential in order to live their best lives. She strongly believes that everyone has their own unique gifts and capacity for success. Connie holds a bachelor's degree in psychology, master's degrees in elementary education and community counseling, and a doctorate degree in educational leadership along with extensive training in gestalt therapy. She spent much of her career as a teacher and administrator working with students living in high poverty and high crime areas in Phoenix. In addition, Connie served for several years as Arizona state president for the American Association of University Women, which fosters equity for women and girls.

After thirty-five years of psychiatric practice and working with thousands of patients, Dr. Westin has observed the widespread presence of poor self-esteem. He has observed and concluded that this is a very significant contributor to many problems in life. How we think, feel, and see ourselves determines how we behave and deal with what life puts in our paths. We were not born with the self-esteem we have now. We all learned "habits of thinking" in response to our environment and these have shaped the creation of our self-esteem. "Impressions of Self" provides a framework for building self-esteem. Dr. Westin has searched for a common root for lifes problems and inner paintried to identify a beginning point, or at least a major element of a problem that can make the most difference if changed. That one thing is self-esteemour impressions of self. We can feel better, enjoy life more, and experience more inner peace if we have solid, positive feelings about ourselves. "Impressions of Self" affirms that there is not only hope, but also the ability within each of us to develop and maintain a comfortable, invigorating, productive self-esteem that can help keep us on lifes road of unexpected twists and turns. You owe to yourself to create the person you want to be. Take a look at this little book--study all of it or the parts most pertinent to you; read and re-read it until the goal of new and better habits of thinking, feeling, and behaving begin to be a reality. This little book is for you.
When our embarrassments and fears lie, we often listen to them anyway. They thwart our gratitude, acceptance, and compassion—our goodness. They insist, “I am not worthy.” But we are worthy—of self-discovery, personal growth, and boundless love. With Brené Brown’s game-changing New York Times bestseller The Gifts of Imperfection—which has sold more than 2 million copies in more than 30 different languages, and Forbes recently named one of the "Five Books That Will Actually Change Your Outlook On Life"—we find courage to overcome paralyzing fear and self-consciousness, strengthening our connection to the world.

A motivational and inspiring guide to wholehearted living, rather than just the average self-help book, with this groundbreaking work Brené Brown, Ph.D., bolsters the self-esteem and personal development process through her characteristic heartfelt, honest storytelling. With original research and plenty of encouragement, she explores the psychology of releasing our definitions of an “imperfect” life and embracing living authentically. Brown’s “ten guideposts” are benchmarks for authenticity that can help anyone establish a practice for a life of honest beauty—a perfectly imperfect life.

Now more than ever, we all need to cultivate feelings of self-worth, as well as acceptance and love for ourselves. In a world where insults, criticisms, and fears are spread too generously alongside messages of unrealistic beauty, attainment, and expectation, we look for ways to “dig deep” and find truth and gratitude in our lives. A new way forward means we can’t hold on too tightly to our own self-defeating thoughts or the displaced pain in our world. Instead, we can embrace the imperfection.
“So long, Carrie Bradshaw—there’s a new role model for go-getting thirty-somethings. Gabrielle Bernstein is doling out inner peace and self-love for the postmodern spiritual set.”—Elle

Foreword by Marianne Williamson

Before she became a celebrated teacher and lecturer, Gabrielle Bernstein was going down a dangerous path. For years, Bernstein struggled with eating disorders, drug and alcohol abuse, and constant self-doubt and self-loathing. That all changed when she discovered A Course in Miracles, which taught her that much of what she feared in life was not frightening at all and, in many cases, not even real.

Now, Bernstein lives an empowered, healthy, and joyful life. In Spirit Junkie, Bernstein guides readers through the life-changing lessons that shaped her spiritual journey: how we become accustomed to fearful ways of thinking, how to recognize and change those thought patterns to make way for bliss, and how to maintain our happiness and share it with the world. By understanding and changing our perceptions, hang-ups will melt away, resentments will release, and a childlike faith in joy will be reignited.
 
Praise for Spirit Junkie

“For those ready to give up their addiction to suffering or who simply need to release the general malaise of a too-busy, too shallow way of life, Spirit Junkie is a soothing balm for the soul.  Gabrielle Bernstein is a brilliant shining guide for all who seek to have more love, more light and more miracles in their life.”—Arielle Ford, author of The Soulmate Secret 
#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

An inspirational book about life and its lessons from the Golden Globe and Emmy nominated star of NBC’s This Is Us.

When This Is Us debuted in fall 2016, a divided America embraced a show that celebrates human connection. The critically acclaimed series became America’s most watched—and most talked about—network show, even building on its fan base in the drama’s second season. As Kate Pearson, Chrissy Metz presents a character that has never been seen on television, yet viewers see themselves in her, no matter what they look like or where they come from. Considered a role model just for being her authentic self, Chrissy found herself on magazine covers and talk shows, walking red carpets, and as the subject of endless conversations on social media “I don’t know what you’ve been through to play her,” she is often told by fans, “but it was something.”

In This is Me, Chrissy Metz shares her story with a raw honesty that will leave readers both surprised but also inspired. Infused with the same authenticity she brings to her starring role, Chrissy’s This is Me is so much more than your standard Hollywood memoir or collection of personal essays. She embraces the spirit of Shonda Rhimes’ Year of Yes, and shares how she has applied the lessons she learned from both setbacks and successes. A born entertainer, Chrissy finds light in even her darkest moments, and leaves the reader feeling they are spending time with a friend who gets it.

Chrissy Metz grew up in a large family, one that always seemed to be moving, and growing. Her father disappeared one day, leaving her mother to work a series of menial jobs and his children to learn to live with the threat of hunger and the electricity being cut off. When her mother remarried, Chrissy hoped for “normal” but instead experienced a form of mental pain that seemed crafted just for her. The boys who showed her attention did so with strings attached as well, and Chrissy accepted it, because for her, love always came with conditions.

When she set out for Los Angeles, it was the first time she had been away from her family and from Florida. And for years, she got barely an audition. So how does a woman with the deck stacked against her radiate such love, beauty and joy? This too is at the heart of This is Me.  

With chapters that alternate from autobiographical to instructional, Chrissy offers practical applications of her hard-won insights in a series of “Bee Mindful” interstitials. There she invites you to embrace gratitude in “Say Thank You” or to be honest with your partner and yourself in “The Shrouded Supreme.” Blending love and experience, Chrissy encourages us all to claim our rightful place in a world that may be trying to knock us down, find our own unique gifts, and pursue our dreams.

Create a wealth of self-worth.

In a black-and-white world, there are two types of people—those who love themselves too much (and walk over everybody else) or hate themselves for failing to achieve goals (and probably end up being taken advantage of by others). But, according to British marital therapist, Andrew G. Marshall, neither has a healthy perception of oneself. This is because the secret to self-esteem does not lie in the extremes of love and hate, but in the middle, in the gray area that teaches us to love ourselves just enough: enough to have love to offer others; enough to be open to receive love from others. Only when this kind of balance is created, can self-love exist.

Like no other book on self-esteem ever written, Learn to Love Yourself Enough helps readers walk through life on middle ground by revealing the seven factors that, together, add up to a wealth of self-worth.
Examine your relationship with your parents: Discover the six types of child-parent relationships and how to accept the legacy of your past. Find Forgiveness: Debunk the two myths about forgiveness and discover what can be gained from negative experiences. Don't let other people put you down: Recognize the five phases of projection and how understanding our own projections lead to better and happy relationships. Re-program your inner voice: Identify the three kinds of negative thinking that work together to undermine self-confidence and whether they are based on fact or just opinion. Set realistic goals: Learn how perfectionism undermines self-esteem. Re-balance yourself: Understand that problems lurk in the extremes and why the middle way is the most successful way. Conquer Fears and Setbacks: Overcome the day-to-day problems that life and other people throw at us.
In her first two books, Byron Katie showed how suffering can be ended by questioning the stressful thoughts that create it, through a process of self-inquiry she calls The Work. Now, in A Thousand Names for Joy, she encourages us to discover the freedom that lives on the other side of inquiry.Stephen Mitchell—the renowned translator of the Tao Te Ching—selected provocative excerpts from that ancient text as a stimulus for Katie to talk about the most essential issues that face us all: life and death, good and evil, love, work, and fulfillment. The result is a book that allows the timeless insights of the Tao Te Ching to resonate anew for us today, while offering a vivid and illuminating glimpse into the life of someone who for twenty years—ever since she “woke up to reality” one morning in 1986—has been living what Lao-tzu wrote more than 2,500 years ago.Katie’s profound, lighthearted wisdom is not theoretical; it is absolutely authentic. That is what makes this book so compelling. It’s a portrait of a woman who is imperturbably joyous, whether she is dancing with her infant granddaughter or finds that her house has been emptied out by burglars, whether she stands before a man about to kill her or embarks on the adventure of walking to the kitchen, whether she learns that she is going blind, flunks a “How Good a Lover Are You?” test, or is diagnosed with cancer. With her stories of total ease in all circumstances, Katie does more than describe the awakened mind; she lets you see it, feel it, in action. And she shows you how that mind is yours as well.
Out of nowhere, like a cool breeze in a marketplace crowded with advice, comes Byron Katie and “The Work.”

In the midst of a normal life, Katie became increasingly depressed, and over a ten-year period sank further into rage, despair, and thoughts of suicide. Then one morning, she woke up in a state of absolute joy, filled with the realization of how her own suffering had ended. The freedom of that realization has never left her, and now in Loving What Is you can discover the same freedom through The Work.

The Work is simply four questions that, when applied to a specific problem, enable you to see what is troubling you in an entirely different light. As Katie says, “It’s not the problem that causes our suffering; it’s our thinking about the problem.” Contrary to popular belief, trying to let go of a painful thought never works; instead, once we have done The Work, the thought lets go of us. At that point, we can truly love what is, just as it is.

Loving What Is will show you step-by-step, through clear and vivid examples, exactly how to use this revolutionary process for yourself. You’ll see people do The Work with Katie on a broad range of human problems, from a wife ready to leave her husband because he wants more sex, to a Manhattan worker paralyzed by fear of terrorism, to a woman suffering over a death in her family. Many people have discovered The Work’s power to solve problems; in addition, they say that through The Work they experience a sense of lasting peace and find the clarity and energy to act, even in situations that had previously seemed impossible.

If you continue to do The Work, you may discover, as many people have, that the questioning flows into every aspect of your life, effortlessly undoing the stressful thoughts that keep you from experiencing peace. Loving What Is offers everything you need to learn and live this remarkable process, and to find happiness as what Katie calls “a lover of reality.”
This book presents the Unfindable Inquiry, the central tool of the Living Inquiries approach to non-dual self-inquiry—a process author Scott Kiloby developed to help you overcome your false sense of separation and the all-too-common, deep-seated belief that you’re not good enough. With this powerful blend of psychology and spirituality, you’ll come to understand that the separate, deficient self cannot be found. What you’ll find instead is a profound sense of peace.

Many of us carry an ingrained belief that we’re somehow inadequate and that we’re separate and alone, which can lead to a general dissatisfaction with life, conflicts with others, and an estrangement from ourselves that causes us to look outward for what we feel is lacking. When we look outside rather than looking within, it’s easy to find ways to confirm our false beliefs about ourselves. With the Living Inquiries, you’ll be able to see your mistaken belief in the “core deficient self” and realize the essential oneness that exists in the here and now.

Starting with the Boomerang Inquiry and the Panorama Inquiry, two self-inquisitive processes of the Living Inquiries, you’ll learn to identify and explore the stories you tell yourself that underlie the challenges and disharmony you experience. Then, once you’ve cracked the foundation of the false deficient self, you’ll use the Unfindable Inquiry and one simple question—Is that you?—to reveal that you are not who or what you’ve taken yourself to be.

No matter what it is you struggle with—anxiety, depression, relationships, trauma, addiction—it’s likely that painful self-judgments, and the belief that you’re separate from the world around you, are at the root of your suffering. With The Unfindable Inquiry, you’ll discover how to finally break free from your false sense of self and separation, and experience a more fulfilling life.

"Ann has always seen the power and potential in young women. The Big Life helps make all our dreams closer than ever." —Lauren Conrad, designer and New York Times bestselling author of Lauren Conrad Celebrate 

"The Big Life is a guide for women in their 20s and 30s who are hungry for a job they love, a supportive network of friends, respect from their bosses, and partners who want all those things for them as badly as they do." —The New York Times

Millennial women are changing what it means to be powerful and successful in the world—for everyone. Forever. You want The Big Life—that delicious cocktail of passion, career, work, ambition, respect, money, and a monumental relationship. And you want it on your own terms. Forget climbing some corporate ladder, you want a career with twists and turns and adventure. For you, success only matters if it’s meaningful. Ann Shoket knows the evolving values of young women more than anyone. She’s the voice behind the popular Badass Babes community, a sisterhood of young, hungry, ambitious women who are helping each other through the most complex issues around becoming who you’re meant to be. As the trailblazing editor-in-chief of Seventeen for the better part of a decade, Shoket led provocative conversations that helped young women navigate the tricky terrain of adolescence and become smart, confident, self-assured young women. Now that they are adding muscle to the framework of their lives, she’s continuing the conversation with The Big Life. 

The Big Life is packed with actionable guidance combined with personal advice from high-profile millennial women who have already achieved tremendous success, plus intimate conversations with a cast of compelling characters and Shoket’s own stories on her quest for The Big Life. You’ll learn to tackle all of the issues on heavy rotation in your mind such as:
• How to craft a career that’s also a passion.
• How to get respect from a boss who thinks you’re a lazy, entitled, and self-obsessed millennial
• Why you need a “squad” of people who support you as you build your Big Life
• How a side hustle will make you smarter, hotter, and more in control of your destiny.
• Why work/life balance is a sham and your need to embrace the mess.
• How to find a partner whose eyes light up when you talk about your ambition.

Written in Shoket’s friendly and authoritative style, The Big Life will help you recognize your power, tap into your ambition, and create your own version of The Big Life.
Your body has a natural sense of truth. We can feel authenticity in ourselves and in others. However, this innate wisdom is obscured by our conditioning—the core limiting beliefs, reactive feelings, and somatic contractions that fuel our sense of struggle and veil who we really are.

In Touch is a groundbreaking, experiential guide to the felt-sense of our “inner knowing”—the deep intelligence available through our bodies. Each chapter presents moving stories, helpful insights from spirituality, psychology, and science, and simple yet potent experiments for integrating the gifts of inner knowing into every aspect of daily life. Join pioneering psychotherapist and teacher Dr. John J. Prendergast to explore:

• The phenomenon of “attunement”—how we accurately sense and resonate with ourselves and others—including an introduction to attachment theory, mirror neurons, and interoception (the ability to sense into the interior of your body)

• Felt-sensing and the subtle body—our ability to have a whole-body sense of reality and how the seven major energy centers relate to common psychospiritual issues

• “Shadows as portals”—how our dark and painful feelings and sensations can point us toward an essential radiance within

• The art of identifying and undoing our core limiting beliefs

• The four somatic qualities of inner knowing—relaxed groundedness, inner alignment, open-heartedness, and spaciousness—and how these subtle signals, once recognized, can guide our choices and help us to navigate life’s challenges

• The fruits of inner knowing—the realization of who we are in our depths and the great intimacy with life we can all enjoy

“As we tune into our deepest nature, our body relaxes, grounds, lines up, opens up, and lights up,” writes Prendergast. “So far this extraordinarily useful subtle feedback has been largely overlooked; almost nothing has been written about it. We need to both sense and decode these signals if we are to benefit from them. These bodily markers are here to be seen and used as guides to enable us to more gracefully navigate life and to awaken. They are part of our birthright, available to anyone.”


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