Similar ebooks

History of customs broker examinations from April 2007 through October 2016 is available in one single volume.   The value of the book is in annotations that are attributed to questions, as well as, a convenient single source document for the past customs broker exam questions. As prospective customs broker examinees prepare for exam by practicing questions from the past, many encounter questions that are outdated and/or no longer applicable. This book applies labels to those questions that are no longer applicable, allowing examinees to focus on questions that are current. Additionally, the book distinguishes questions that stand out because they continuously show up on customs broker exams.

This book also guides examinees to other study material that explores background and reasoning behind questions in more detail. Other study materials include Textbook and Exercise Book. More information about these study companions is available at their dedicated webpages.

Applicable Labels Include:

DIFFICULT LOGIC: Denotes question where logical parallels between question and answer provided by customs examiners are difficult to establish.

DISCUSSED IN EXERCISE BOOK: Denotes question that is addressed in the Exercise Book, which offers logical explanations (reasoning) as to why the particular answer choice is correct.

ASSIGNED IN TEXTBOOK: Denotes that the question has been discussed in the Textbook.  The question is usually assigned in the Web Supplement portion of the Textbook’s relevant chapter. The question can also form a part of Textbook’s substantive discussion.

INCORRECT CITATION: Denotes error in citation (usually to law or regulation) provided by customs examiners in the answer key for a given question. May also denote error in the answer choice, where legal citation was correct.

MULTIPLE ANSWER QUESTION: Denotes the question with more than one correct answer choice. This label also pertains to questions that received credit(s) for all of the answers, unless these answer choices are contradictory (see REMOVED).

OUTDATED: Denotes question or answer choices that became outdated due to changes in law, facts, or Customs (CBP) practice.  Classification questions where one or more of the HTSUS numbers in the answer choice are no longer valid are marked as outdated, notwithstanding the validity of other HTSUS numbers.  This is done because many classification questions require inquiry into several HTSUS codes (e.g. General Rule of Interpretation 3 analysis), which cannot be effectively made with some of the HTSUS numbers being no longer valid. Additionally, process of elimination is difficult with outdated HTSUS numbers.

REMOVED: Denotes question that was removed from the initial examination. This label also applies to questions that are marked as “x” or “no correct answer” by customs examiners. If customs examiners grant credit for all answers, and answer choices are contradictory, then this label is applied also.

REPEATED QUESTION: Denotes question that appeared in previous examinations.  The goal of this label is to alert prospective examinees that customs examiners place higher value on the question, implying its likelihood of re-appearance on the future exams.

The latest research suggests that 33% of people lie deliberately to achieve employment. The costs of mis-hires are significant in terms of management time, selection and reselection costs and potential legal costs. There are 101 opportunities for applicants to economize with the truth, exaggerate or simply lie, both on their CV and at interview. They may be desperate in a competitive job market; they may think that exaggeration is an expected part of the process or they just rely on the fact that many employers still fail to make the most rudimentary of checks of what they are told. Max Eggert’s Deception in Selection will help you, the recruiter, to understand how and why candidates deceive. The book examines proven techniques and tactics to balance the interview game, to restore equity in the face of the clever approaches that sophisticated candidates bring to the interview. Although there is no foolproof way of identifying deception, you can, with practice, become amazingly accurate if there is a commitment to master the basics. The object of this book is to learn how to detect more effectively the fabrications that candidates present in selection situations that would have a direct adverse effect on their performance in the job. Reading it will encourage you to look at lying and truth telling in a new light and discover how pervasively lies and self-deception influence selection decisions. This is a must read guide from a best-selling business author for all those who participate in the selection process.
Classification societies are charged with the technical supervision of maritime shipping to enhance the safety of life and property at sea by securing high te- nical standards of design, manufacture, construction and maintenance of seagoing vessels. Each and every shipping catastrophe caused by a technical defect reminds the maritime world of the central importance of the vessel’s proper technical supervision. Correspondingly, the liability of classification societies has become a particularly discussed issue over the past years. Their contractual liability is usually limited by general terms and conditions incorporated in the classification rules and cases brought by typical contracting partners of classification societies, such as ship owners and ship yards, are not an issue in the current debate. H- ever, one can note a substantial worldwide increase of actions brought by parties who are not in privity with classification societies. This study focuses on third-party liability of classification societies. It ori- nates in an expert opinion on selected issues relating to third-party liability which the authors compiled for the German classification society Germanischer Lloyd AG. Driven by the highly interesting legal issues and unexplored shores in this area of law, we continued our research and are able to present a relatively c- prehensive overview on the law on third-party liability of classification societies. Given the origins of our work, the discussion of limitations of liability clauses is based on the standard terms and conditions of the Germanischer Lloyd, version 2005.
The events of September 11, 2001, have forever changed the dynamics of importing or exporting products into the United States. This privilege, which can be revoked for non-compliance, has been made dramatically more complex and expensive by the numerous new rules, regulations, laws and requirements of various agencies. This comprehensive reference provides sound and innovative purchasing, logistics and supply chain management techniques for acquiring customers, increasing competitive advantage, reducing costs and improving end-to end supply chain performance while ensuring required compliance. Key FeaturesProvides comprehensive importer and foreign entity guidelines for achieving cost savings, improving delivery turnaround time, securing compliance, building product classifications and optimizing trade for reduced or eliminated dutiesExplains how to set up a purchasing cost analysis program for quick evaluation and obtain cost savings via currency hedging and a forward currency contract, and provides activity-based costing information to help firms manage and benchmark logistics costsDiscusses various levels of automation, from document imaging to full automation of the compliance process, including how RFID smart labels can improve your supply chain, and presents innovative ways of achieving JIT inventory for imported merchandiseCovers global e-sourcing systems, applications, processes and best supply chain practices as well as new electronic procurement standardizations to analyze requirements, identify gaps and improve the interoperability of Internet-based eprocurement systemsReviews compliance with post 9/11 customs and security requirements for global trade and outlines processes and time lines for “ready-to-market” regulated product registrationsWAV offers free downloadable slides that provide a high-level overview of the importance of an integrated logistics compliance system, a U.S. Customs 2005 Harmonized Tariff Schedule, and a list of helpful websites for regulatory product information and government forms required for U.S. clearance — available from the Web Added Value™ Download Resource Center at www.jrosspub.com
History of customs broker examinations from April 1997 through October 2006 is available in one single volume.   The value of the book is in annotations that are attributed to questions, as well as, a convenient single source document for the past customs broker exam questions. As prospective customs broker examinees prepare for exam by practicing questions from the past, many encounter questions that are outdated and/or no longer applicable. This book applies labels to those questions that are no longer applicable, allowing examinees to focus on questions that are current. Additionally, the book distinguishes questions that stand out because they continuously show up on customs broker exams.

This book also guides examinees to other study material that explores background and reasoning behind questions in more detail. Other study materials include Textbook and Exercise Book. More information about these study companions is available at their dedicated webpages.

Applicable Labels Include:

DIFFICULT LOGIC: Denotes question where logical parallels between question and answer provided by customs examiners are difficult to establish.

DISCUSSED IN EXERCISE BOOK: Denotes question that is addressed in the Exercise Book, which offers logical explanations (reasoning) as to why the particular answer choice is correct.

ASSIGNED IN TEXTBOOK: Denotes that the question has been discussed in the Textbook.  The question is usually assigned in the Web Supplement portion of the Textbook’s relevant chapter. The question can also form a part of Textbook’s substantive discussion.

INCORRECT CITATION: Denotes error in citation (usually to law or regulation) provided by customs examiners in the answer key for a given question. May also denote error in the answer choice, where legal citation was correct.

MULTIPLE ANSWER QUESTION: Denotes the question with more than one correct answer choice. This label also pertains to questions that received credit(s) for all of the answers, unless these answer choices are contradictory (see REMOVED).

OUTDATED: Denotes question or answer choices that became outdated due to changes in law, facts, or Customs (CBP) practice.  Classification questions where one or more of the HTSUS numbers in the answer choice are no longer valid are marked as outdated, notwithstanding the validity of other HTSUS numbers.  This is done because many classification questions require inquiry into several HTSUS codes (e.g. General Rule of Interpretation 3 analysis), which cannot be effectively made with some of the HTSUS numbers being no longer valid. Additionally, process of elimination is difficult with outdated HTSUS numbers.

REMOVED: Denotes question that was removed from the initial examination. This label also applies to questions that are marked as “x” or “no correct answer” by customs examiners. If customs examiners grant credit for all answers, and answer choices are contradictory, then this label is applied also.

REPEATED QUESTION: Denotes question that appeared in previous examinations.  The goal of this label is to alert prospective examinees that customs examiners place higher value on the question, implying its likelihood of re-appearance on the future exams.

The Japan-led Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPPA) of 2018 is the most far-reaching 'megaregional' economic agreement in force, with several major countries beyond its eleven negotiating countries also interested. Still bearing the stamp of the original US involvement before the Trump-era reversal, TPP is the first instance of 'megaregulation': a demanding combination of inter-state economic ordering and national regulatory governance on a highly ambitious substantive and trans-regional scale. Its text and ambition have influenced other negotiations ranging from the Japan-EU Agreement (JEEPA) and the US-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) to the projected Pan-Asian Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP). This book provides an extensive analysis of TPP as a megaregulatory project for channelling and managing new pressures of globalization, and of core critical arguments made against economic megaregulation from standpoints of development, inequality, labour rights, environmental interests, corporate capture, and elite governance. Specialized chapters cover supply chains, digital economy, trade facilitation, intellectual property, currency levels, competition and state-owned enterprises, government procurement, investment, prescriptions for national regulation, and the TPP institutions. Country studies include detailed analyses of TPP-related politics and approaches in Japan, Mexico, Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, and Thailand. Contributors include leading practitioners and scholars in law, economics, and political science. At a time when the WTO and other global-scale institutions are struggling with economic nationalism and geopolitics, and bilateral and regional agreements are pressed by public disagreement and incompatibility with digital and capital and value chain flows, the megaregional ambition of TPP is increasingly important as a precedent requiring the close scrutiny this book presents.
Jagdish Bhagwati, the internationally renowned economist who uniquely combines a reputation as the leading scholar of international trade with a substantial presence in public policy on the important issues of the day, shines here a critical light on Preferential Trade Agreements, revealing how the rapid spread of PTAs endangers the world trading system. Numbering by now well over 300, and rapidly increasing, these preferential trade agreements, many taking the form of Free Trade Agreements, have re-created the unhappy situation of the 1930s, when world trade was undermined by discriminatory practices. Whereas this was the result of protectionism in those days, ironically it is a result of misdirected pursuit of free trade via PTAs today. The world trading system is at risk again, the author argues, and the danger is palpable. Writing with his customary wit, panache and elegance, Bhagwati documents the growth of these PTAs, the reasons for their proliferation, and their deplorable consequences which include the near-destruction of the non-discrimination which was at the heart of the postwar trade architecture and its replacement by what he has called the spaghetti bowl of a maze of preferences. Bhagwati also documents how PTAs have undermined the prospects for multilateral freeing of trade, serving as stumbling blocks, instead of building blocks, for the objective of reaching multilateral free trade. In short, Bhagwati cogently demonstrates why PTAs are Termites in the Trading System.
The United Nations's groundbreaking Arms Trade Treaty (ATT), which went into effect in 2014, sets legally binding standards to regulate global arms exports and reflects the growing concerns toward the significant role that small and major conventional arms play in perpetuating human rights violations, conflict, and societal instability worldwide. Many countries that once staunchly opposed shared export controls and their perceived threat to political and economic autonomy are now beginning to embrace numerous agreements, such as the ATT and the EU Code of Conduct.

Jennifer L. Erickson explores the reasons top arms-exporting democracies have put aside past sovereignty, security, and economic worries in favor of humanitarian arms transfer controls, and she follows the early effects of this about-face on export practice. She begins with a brief history of failed arms export control initiatives and then tracks arms transfer trends over time. Pinpointing the normative shifts in the 1990s that put humanitarian arms control on the table, she reveals that these states committed to these policies out of concern for their international reputations. She also highlights how arms trade scandals threaten domestic reputations and thus help improve compliance. Using statistical data and interviews conducted in France, Germany, Belgium, the United Kingdom, and the United States, Erickson challenges existing IR theories of state behavior while providing insight into the role of reputation as a social mechanism and the importance of government transparency and accountability in generating compliance with new norms and rules.

The Company Law Concentrate is written and designed to help you succeed. Written by experts and covering all key topics, Concentrate guides help focus your revision and maximise your exam performance. Each guide includes revision tips, advice on how to achieve extra marks, and a thorough and focused breakdown of the key topics and cases. Revision guides you can rely on: trusted by lecturers, loved by students... "I have always used OUP revision and Q&A books and genuinely believe they have helped me get better grades" - Anthony Poole, law student, Swansea University "The detail in this revision textbook is phenomenal and is just what is needed to push your exam preparation to the next level". - Stephanie Lomas, law student, University of Central Lancashire "It is a little more in-depth than other revision guides, and also has clear diagrams and teaches ways to obtain extra marks. These features make it unique" - Godwin Tan, law student, University College London "The concentrate revision guides stand out against other revision guides" - Renae Haynes Williams, law student, Bangor University "The exam style questions are brilliant and the series is very detailed, prepares you well" - Frances Easton, law student, University of Birmingham "The accompanying website for Concentrate is the most impressive I've come across" - Alice Munnelly, law student, Kings College London "-it is a fantastic book. It covers absolutely all topics you need for the course." - Emma McGeorge, law student, Strathclyde University
Chartered by the crown in 1474, the Merchant Adventurers was England's preeminent regulated international trading company until the early nineteenth century. It functioned as a guild, with members who were the only merchants entitled to export finished cloth from the growing English woolen industry, which gave them an unchallenged monopoly. It was the only company entitled to export cloth from England to other countries. The organization served as a social channel for its members, who built The Merchant Adventurers Hall at York in the North of England after the group was formed in 1357. This source book collects eighteen substantial documents written between 1407 and 1805, the most important years of the society's history. This group includes the Charter of 1407, extracts from the Charter of Edward IV (1462) and the Laws and Ordinances of 1608. Taken together, these records form one of the most detailed pictures of business organizations and methods during the later Tudor, the Stuart, and the early Hanoverian eras. With detailed notes and an extensive introduction. CONTENTS The Merchant Adventurers, A Brief History The Laws and Ordinances The Rise and State of the Fellowship The Statute of 1497 Extracts from Wheeler, A Treatise of Commerce Residence towns of the Adventurers The number of freemen Extract from "the Debate betweene the Heraides" The Charter of 1407 Extracts from the Charter of Edward IV, 1462 Extracts from the Charter of Elizabeth of 1464 List of the Foreign Grants and Privileges of the Fellowship Abstract of the Privileges of the Merchant Adventurers at Dort Extracts from the Court Register of the Company Ordinance of the Lords and Commons, 1643 Extract from the Act of 1688, "laying open "the trade of the Society Correspondence by Wm. Rycant, Resident at Hamburg Letter from the States General of Holland concerning those of the Society still left in the City of Dort, 1751 Letter from Lord Bute to Mr. Mathias, 1761, and the French note concerning the establishment of a French Company Correspondence of Thornton, 1805 By-law of 1688 (continued from pages 197) "The bulk of this volume is devoted to the "Laws, Customes and Ordinances of the ffellowshippe of Merchantes Adventurers of the Realm of England, etc.," a large folio volume of over 200 pages kept since 1852 among the additional manuscripts of the British Museum, and probably compiled between 1608 and 1611. In these pages we have the public and official side of one of the great mediaeval industries of England-the continental distribution of the woollen goods for which that kingdom was once so remarkable. Though the society may be said to have lived for six centuries, from the twelfth to the beginning of the nineteenth, its chief activity seems to have been from the fifteenth to the middle of the eighteenth, first in the North of France and in the Low Countries, and then at Hamburg. The extensive private records of the "Merchant Adventurers" have not yet been found but enough original material exists in this volume to throw much light on the beginnings of the continental commerce of England, especially in the period when the English were ceasing to export the raw wool and taking up at home the manufacture of cloth for the continental market. Thereby the prosperity of Florence and other cities of Northern Italy was affected in no small degree, and the balance of industrial daring and consequent wealth moved northward. In the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries the rivalries of the Emperor and the Crown of England transferred the "Staple" or warehouses of the society from Antwerp to Hamburg, and brought on a long warfare with the Hanseatic League, that ended disastrously enough for the former." Thomas J. Shahan, The Catholic University Bulletin, Volume 8, No. 4, October, 1902
The rapid growth in investment treaties has led to a burgeoning number of international arbitration decisions that have applied and interpreted treaty provisions in disputes between investors and states concerning their respective rights. This flurry of treaties and arbitral decisions has seen the creation of a new branch of international law- the law of investment claims. In this revised edition, Jeswald Salacuse examines the law of international investment treaties, specifically in relation to its origins, structure, content, and effect, as well as their impact on international investors and investments, and the governments that are parties to them. Investment treaty law is a rapidly evolving field and since publication of the first edition, the law of international investment treaties has both experienced considerable growth and generated extensive controversy. 2011 saw the highest number of new treaty-based arbitration filed under international investment agreements to date, and in July 2014, the Yukos Universal Limited (Isle of Man) v The Russian Federation culminated with awards of over US$50 billion; a historic record for any arbitration. Controversy in this field has primarily revolved around the investor-state dispute settlement process, which as thus far involved at least 98 states as respondents. Salacuse captures these developments in this updated edition, examining not only the significant growth in treaties, but the trends that have followed, and their effect on the content and evolution of the law of investment treaties. Specific topics include conditions for the entry of foreign investment and general standards of treatment of foreign investments; monetary transfers; operational conditions; protection against expropriation; dispossession and compensation for losses; dispute settlement, including negotiation, arbitration, and conciliation; and judicial proceedings.
©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.