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Built in the fifth century b.c., the Parthenon has been venerated for more than two millennia as the West’s ultimate paragon of beauty and proportion. Since the Enlightenment, it has also come to represent our political ideals, the lavish temple to the goddess Athena serving as the model for our most hallowed civic architecture. But how much do the values of those who built the Parthenon truly correspond with our own? And apart from the significance with which we have invested it, what exactly did this marvel of human hands mean to those who made it?

In this revolutionary book, Joan Breton Connelly challenges our most basic assumptions about the Parthenon and the ancient Athenians. Beginning with the natural environment and its rich mythic associations, she re-creates the development of the Acropolis—the Sacred Rock at the heart of the city-state—from its prehistoric origins to its Periklean glory days as a constellation of temples among which the Parthenon stood supreme. In particular, she probes the Parthenon’s legendary frieze: the 525-foot-long relief sculpture that originally encircled the upper reaches before it was partially destroyed by Venetian cannon fire (in the seventeenth century) and most of what remained was shipped off to Britain (in the nineteenth century) among the Elgin marbles. The frieze’s vast enigmatic procession—a dazzling pageant of cavalrymen and elders, musicians and maidens—has for more than two hundred years been thought to represent a scene of annual civic celebration in the birthplace of democracy. But thanks to a once-lost play by Euripides (the discovery of which, in the wrappings of a Hellenistic Egyptian mummy, is only one of this book’s intriguing adventures), Connelly has uncovered a long-buried meaning, a story of human sacrifice set during the city’s mythic founding. In a society startlingly preoccupied with cult ritual, this story was at the core of what it meant to be Athenian. Connelly reveals a world that beggars our popular notions of Athens as a city of staid philosophers, rationalists, and rhetoricians, a world in which our modern secular conception of democracy would have been simply incomprehensible.

The Parthenon’s full significance has been obscured until now owing in no small part, Connelly argues, to the frieze’s dismemberment. And so her investigation concludes with a call to reunite the pieces, in order that what is perhaps the greatest single work of art surviving from antiquity may be viewed more nearly as its makers intended. Marshalling a breathtaking range of textual and visual evidence, full of fresh insights woven into a thrilling narrative that brings the distant past to life, The Parthenon Enigma is sure to become a landmark in our understanding of the civilization from which we claim cultural descent.
November 4, 1922. For six seasons the legendary Valley of the Kings has yielded no secrets to Howard Carter and his archeological team: "We had almost made up our minds that we were beaten,” he writes, “and were preparing to leave The Valley and try our luck elsewhere; and then--hardly had we set hoe to ground in our last despairing effort than we made a discovery that far exceeded our wildest dreams."
Join Howard Carter in his fascinating odyssey toward the most dramatic archeological find of the century--the tomb of Tutankhamen. Written by Carter in 1923, only a year after the discovery, this book captures the overwhelming exhilaration of the find, the painstaking, step-by-step process of excavation, and the wonder of opening a treasure-filled inner chamber whose regal inhabitant had been dead for 3,000 years.
104 on-the-spot photographs chronicle the phases of the discovery and the scrupulous cataloging of the treasures. The opening chapters discuss the life of Tutankhamen and earlier archeological work in the Valley of the Kings. An appendix contains fully captioned photographs of the objects obtained from the tomb. A new preface by Jon Manchip White adds information on Carter's career, recent opinions on Tutankhamen's reign, and the importance of Carter's discovery to Egyptologists.
Millions have seen the stunning artifacts which came from the tomb—they are among the glories of the Cairo Museum, and have made triumphal tours to museums the world over. They are a testament to the enigmatic young king, and to the unwavering tenacity of the man who brought them to light as described in this remarkable narrative.
In the beginning of creation, the world was built on the foundation of The Divine Law of Maat/Kongo, as known by The Great Nile Valley Civilization. This Divine Law gave birth to everything we have today . "I-Vine Spheres" is a book that can help children and adults alike to begin to explore the accurate science of Creation and the complex anatomy of the Whole Spirit (Hidden Life Force/Energy/Vibes). 'I' relates to the Self (Source/Indwelling Divinity/Omnipresent/One Being/Conscience/World Soul/InI). The 'Vine' refers to the interconnection, inter-relation and inter-dependance of all things as fixed by nature within the beautiful cultivation of The I-Vine Spheres of Life. Many religions tell us we are like (made in the image of) The Almighty, but fail to fully explain/simplify what these likenesses are. This Book will show you and your children the 11 aspects of Being which are 'God/Christ like'. This book will outline a simple version of the I-Vine Spheres of Life; Paut Neteru (Cake of the Gods); Enead. The colors given to each sphere are the actual colors relating to that aspect of being or faculty of the spirit. Your children will be able to enrich and spark their inner Self, and gain connection of colors in the mind. Their are activities in this book, and your child will intuitively share with you the colors or activities they favor mostly, and allow you to learn more of your children. The Spirit is a body of Laws governing both the seen (its denser form) and unseen (less dense forms) phenomena. This I-Vine Spheres book will outline the main 11 Laws of the Spirit, and also provide a solid knowledge base and substantial food for the growth/development of impressionable minds. As well as minds that need substantial food to be successful holistically. Throughout all history and time, Afrikan people have used this reality to develop rites of passages (to know self), governments and technology. Principles, morals and astrologicial/cosmic knowledge is transferred via story telling in The Afrikan oral, visual and written traditions. This is the very foundation of the laws/institutes that continue to govern civil societies to this day. In the same way the well known '42 declarations of Maat' were practical expressions/statements/affirmations derived from the 11 main laws of our Being. We could now do better with exemplifying and teaching Divine Law/I-Vine Law, for the redemption and salvation of all people. It proven difficult for soldiers, linguistics and museum curators to explain ancient teachings/concepts of the Kamau (Ancient Egyptian) Sages, Fari (Pharaohs'), Priests, astrologers and prophets. It has been difficult for them to know what the sacred scriptures meant to the great ancient authors of the Afrikan Tradition. Misinterpretation and poor understandings come from numerous invasions, looting and the deliberate destruction of monuments. This book is corrective of such errors in interpretations about the meanings of the sacred sciences of the Whole Spirit/Vibes/Hidden Life Force. This book was inspired by a Rastafari/reggae song called '11 Laws of Maat' recorded by the author under the name Blessed Barak*. Therefore this book has strong elements of Xaymacan (Jamaica) patious and the author has thoughtfully included a dictionary in the book for those who are not so familiar with it. He is quite proud to be able to give a patious reading book to the many children of the Afrikan diaspora who have been carried beyond. Also, due to the globalisation of the Rastafari way of Life, many people of other cultures can enjoy hearing and reading the patious and Rastafari Language. *A complimentary free audio download of the song is available by e-mailing info@lionsdenfam.org (offer ends Feb 2013)
 My purpose in writing this book has been to present in as clear and understandable form as possible the important facts about ceramic materials and their use in pottery. 
The ceramic medium has a rich potential. It is so various and adaptable that each culture and each succeeding generation finds in it a new means of expression. As a medium, it is capable of great beauty of form, color, and texture, and its expressions are unique not only for variety but for permanence and utility as well. To make full use of the medium, the ceramist or potter not only needs skill, imagination, and artistic vision, but he also needs to have a sound knowledge of the technical side of the craft. This knowledge has not been easy to come by, and many of those seriously engaged in pottery have learned through endless experimentation and discouraging failures. It is hoped that the present work will enable the creative worker to go more directly to his goal in pottery, and that it will enable him to experiment intelligently and with a minimum of lost effort. While technical information must not be considered as an end in itself, it is a necessary prerequisite to a free and creative choice of means in ceramics. 

None of the subjects included are dealt with exhaustively, and I have tried not to overwhelm the reader with details. The information given is presented in as practical form as possible, and no more technical data or chemical theory is given than has been thought necessary to clarify the subject. 

This work is organized as follows: 

Part One—Clay 
Chapter I. Geologic Origins of Clay 
Chapter 2. The Chemical Composition of Clay 
Chapter 3. The Physical Nature of Clay 
Chapter 4. Drying and Firing Clay 
Chapter 5. Kinds of Clay 
Chapter 6. Clay Bodies 
Chapter 7. Mining and Preparing Clay 

Part Two—Glazes 
Chapter 8. The Nature of Glass and Glazes 
Chapter 9. Early Types of Glazes 
Chapter 10. The Oxides and Their Function in Glaze Forming 
Chapter 11. Glaze Materials 
Chapter 12. Glaze Calculations, Theory and Objectives 
Chapter 13. Glaze Calculation Using Materials Containing More Than One Oxide 
Chapter 14. Calculating Glaze Formulas from Batches or Recipes 
Chapter 15. Practical Problems in Glaze Calculation 
Chapter 16. The Composition of Glazes 
Chapter 17. Types of Glazes 
Chapter 18. Originating Glaze Formulas 
Chapter 19. Fritted Glazes 
Chapter 20. Glaze Textures 
Chapter 21. Sources of Color in Glazes 
Chapter 22. Methods of Compounding and Blending Colored Glazes 
Chapter 23. Glaze Mixing and Application 
Chapter 24. Firing Glazes 
Chapter 25. Glaze Flaws 
Chapter 26. Engobes 
Chapter 27. Underglaze Colors and Decoration 
Chapter 28. Overglaze Decoration 
Chapter 29. Reduction Firing and Reduction Glazes 
Chapter 30. Special Glazes and Glaze Effects
There are a few questions that professional artists get asked regularly: Where do you get your ideas? How did you get started? And be honest—are you really in it for the money?

Following the highly successful Me Funny and Me Sexy anthologies, Me Artsy answers these eternal questions and more. With essays from fourteen First Nations artists from a variety of disciplines, the collection provides insight into the paths that led each artist to pursue and develop his or her craft. The essays explore many common themes around the role of art in First Nations communities, including the importance of art for creating social change, the role of art in representing Native culture and the fusion of traditional and contemporary techniques. On a more personal level, the essays describe the significance of art in the lives of the contributors, along with their sometimes unlikely journeys to success, stories which are often touched with humour and humility.

Chef David Wolfman describes gruelling years of prep work in the kitchens of the exclusive National Club; filmmaker Zacharias Kunuk discusses leaping into his first feature film without knowing how to finance it; fashion designer Kim Picard describes making a dress inspired by coffee beans; and playwright Drew Hayden Taylor tells the story of putting a bullet through his first play and burying it in his yard. Other contributors include actor/playwright Monique Mojica, painter Marianne Nicolson, painter Maxine Noel, blues pianist Murray Porter, scholar Karyn Recollet, dancer/choreographer Santee Smith, director/actor Rose Stella, drummer Steve Teekens, writer Richard Van Camp and manga artist Michael Nicholl Yahgulanaas.
The leading art critic of the Victorian era, John Ruskin created a large body of work, writing influential essays and treatises on subjects as varied as geology, architecture, ornithology, literature, education, botany and political economy, to name but a few. This comprehensive eBook presents the complete published works of John Ruskin, with numerous illustrations, rare texts appearing in digital print for the first time, informative introductions and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 1)

* Beautifully illustrated with images relating to Ruskin’s life and works
* Concise introductions to the famous art books and other texts
* ALL the art criticism and published prose works, with individual contents tables
* Images of how the books were first printed, giving your eReader a taste of the original texts
* Excellent formatting of the texts
* Famous works such as MODERN PAINTERS and THE STONES OF VENICE are fully illustrated with their original artwork
* The complete poetry is presented in the scholarly Cook and Wedderburn edition
* Special alphabetical contents tables for the poetry - easily locate the poems you want to read
* The complete letters of the FORS CLAVIGERA with footnotes (Cook and Wedderburn), including the famous Whistler pamphlet – first time in digital print
* All the travel books
* Includes Ruskin’s rare autobiography PRAETERITA (Cook and Wedderburn), accompanied with the scarce DILECTA
* Special criticism section, with essays evaluating Ruskin’s contribution to literature and art criticism
* Features a bonus biography - discover Ruskin’s literary life
* Even offers a special illustrated section on Ruskin’s paintings
* Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres

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CONTENTS:

The Art Criticism
MODERN PAINTERS
THE SEVEN LAMPS OF ARCHITECTURE
PRE-RAPHAELITISM
GIOTTO AND HIS WORKS IN PADUA
LECTURES ON ARCHITECTURE AND PAINTING DELIVERED AT EDINBURGH IN NOVEMBER, 1853
LETTERS TO THE “TIMES” ON THE TURNER BEQUEST 1856, 1857
NOTES ON THE TURNER GALLERY AT MARLBOROUGH HOUSE
THE ELEMENTS OF DRAWING
A JOY FOR EVER
THE TWO PATHS
THE ELEMENTS OF PERSPECTIVE
SESAME AND LILIES
LECTURES ON ART DELIVERED BEFORE THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD IN HILARY TERM, 1870
ARATRA PENTELICI
THE EAGLE’S NEST
THE POETRY OF ARCHITECTURE
ARIADNE FLORENTINA
FRONDES AGRESTES
VAL D’ARNO
NOTES BY MR. RUSKIN ON HIS DRAWINGS BY THE LATE J. M. W. TURNER
THE LAWS OF FÉSOLE
NOTES ON SAMUEL PROUT AND WILLIAM HUNT
CIRCULAR RESPECTING MEMORIAL STUDIES OF ST. MARK’S, VENICE
THE ART OF ENGLAND
THE PLEASURES OF ENGLAND
FINAL LECTURES AT OXFORD
LECTURES ON LANDSCAPE
LECTURES AND NOTES FOR LECTURES ON GREEK ART AND MYTHOLOGY

The Travel Books
THE STONES OF VENICE
MORNINGS IN FLORENCE
ST. MARK’S REST
‘OUR FATHERS HAVE TOLD US’

Other Prose Works
THE KING OF THE GOLDEN RIVER
THE HARBOURS OF ENGLAND
‘UNTO THIS LAST’
THE ETHICS OF THE DUST
THE CROWN OF WILD OLIVE
TIME AND TIDE BY WEARE AND TYNE
LEONI: A LEGEND OF ITALY
THE QUEEN OF THE AIR
FORS CLAVIGERA
MUNERA PULVERIS
LOVE’S MEINIE
PROSERPINA
ELEMENTS OF ENGLISH PROSODY
ARROWS OF THE CHACE
THE STORM CLOUD OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY
ON THE OLD ROAD
PRAETERITA
HORTUS INCLUSUS
RUSKINIANA

The Poetry
INTRODUCTION TO RUSKIN’S POETRY by E. T. Cook
THE POEMS: TABLE OF CONTENTS
LIST OF POEMS IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER

The Paintings
RUSKIN’S PAINTINGS

The Criticism
RUSKIN by G. K. Chesterton
RUSKIN by Henry Major Tomlinson
RUSKIN AS POET by W. H. Davenport Adams
CONTEMPORARY NOTES ON WHISTLER vs. RUSKIN by Henry James
RUSKIN by Virginia Woolf

The Biography
THE LIFE OF JOHN RUSKIN by W. G. Collingwood

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Alexander the Great led one of the most successful armies in history and conquered nearly the entirety of the known world while wearing armor made of cloth. How is that possible? In Reconstructing Ancient Linen Body Armor, Gregory S. Aldrete, Scott Bartell, and Alicia Aldrete provide the answer.

An extensive multiyear project in experimental archaeology, this pioneering study presents a thorough investigation of the linothorax, linen armor worn by the Greeks, Macedonians, and other ancient Mediterranean warriors. Because the linothorax was made of cloth, no examples of it have survived. As a result, even though there are dozens of references to the linothorax in ancient literature and nearly a thousand images of it in ancient art, this linen armor remains relatively ignored and misunderstood by scholars.

Combining traditional textual and archaeological analysis with hands-on reconstruction and experimentation, the authors unravel the mysteries surrounding the linothorax. They have collected and examined all of the literary, visual, historical, and archaeological evidence for the armor and detail their efforts to replicate the armor using materials and techniques that are as close as possible to those employed in antiquity. By reconstructing actual examples using authentic materials, the authors were able to scientifically assess the true qualities of linen armor for the first time in 1,500 years. The tests reveal that the linothorax provided surprisingly effective protection for ancient warriors, that it had several advantages over bronze armor, and that it even shared qualities with modern-day Kevlar.

Previously featured in documentaries on the Discovery Channel and the Canadian History Channel, as well as in U.S. News and World Report, MSNBC Online, and other international venues, this groundbreaking work will be a landmark in the study of ancient warfare.

-- John W. I. Lee, University of California, Santa Barbara
Child of the Fire is the first book-length examination of the career of the nineteenth-century artist Mary Edmonia Lewis, best known for her sculptures inspired by historical and biblical themes. Throughout this richly illustrated study, Kirsten Pai Buick investigates how Lewis and her work were perceived, and their meanings manipulated, by others and the sculptor herself. She argues against the racialist art discourse that has long cast Lewis’s sculptures as reflections of her identity as an African American and Native American woman who lived most of her life abroad. Instead, by seeking to reveal Lewis’s intentions through analyses of her career and artwork, Buick illuminates Lewis’s fraught but active participation in the creation of a distinct “American” national art, one dominated by themes of indigeneity, sentimentality, gender, and race. In so doing, she shows that the sculptor variously complicated and facilitated the dominant ideologies of the vanishing American (the notion that Native Americans were a dying race), sentimentality, and true womanhood.

Buick considers the institutions and people that supported Lewis’s career—including Oberlin College, abolitionists in Boston, and American expatriates in Italy—and she explores how their agendas affected the way they perceived and described the artist. Analyzing four of Lewis’s most popular sculptures, each created between 1866 and 1876, Buick discusses interpretations of Hiawatha in terms of the cultural impact of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s epic poem The Song of Hiawatha; Forever Free and Hagar in the Wilderness in light of art historians’ assumptions that artworks created by African American artists necessarily reflect African American themes; and The Death of Cleopatra in relation to broader problems of reading art as a reflection of identity.

When Europeans first arrived in North America, between five and eight million indigenous people were already living there. But how did they come to be here? What were their agricultural, spiritual, and hunting practices? How did their societies evolve and what challenges do they face today? Eminent historians Theda Perdue and Michael Green begin by describing how nomadic bands of hunter-gatherers followed the bison and woolly mammoth over the Bering land mass between Asia and what is now Alaska between 25,000 and 15,000 years ago, settling throughout North America. They describe hunting practices among different tribes, how some made the gradual transition to more settled, agricultural ways of life, the role of kinship and cooperation in Native societies, their varied burial rites and spiritual practices, and many other features of Native American life. Throughout the book, Perdue and Green stress the great diversity of indigenous peoples in America, who spoke more than 400 different languages before the arrival of Europeans and whose ways of life varied according to the environments they settled in and adapted to so successfully. Most importantly, the authors stress how Native Americans have struggled to maintain their sovereignty--first with European powers and then with the United States--in order to retain their lands, govern themselves, support their people, and pursue practices that have made their lives meaningful. Going beyond the stereotypes that so often distort our views of Native Americans, this Very Short Introduction offers a historically accurate, deeply engaging, and often inspiring account of the wide array of Native peoples in America. About the Series: Combining authority with wit, accessibility, and style, Very Short Introductions offer an introduction to some of life's most interesting topics. Written by experts for the newcomer, they demonstrate the finest contemporary thinking about the central problems and issues in hundreds of key topics, from philosophy to Freud, quantum theory to Islam.
In this sweeping work of memoir and commentary, leading cultural critic Paul Chaat Smith illustrates with dry wit and brutal honesty the contradictions of life in “the Indian business.” 

Raised in suburban Maryland and Oklahoma, Smith dove head first into the political radicalism of the 1970s, working with the American Indian Movement until it dissolved into dysfunction and infighting. Afterward he lived in New York, the city of choice for political exiles, and eventually arrived in Washington, D.C., at the newly minted National Museum of the American Indian (“a bad idea whose time has come”) as a curator. In his journey from fighting activist to federal employee, Smith tells us he has discovered at least two things: there is no one true representation of the American Indian experience, and even the best of intentions sometimes ends in catastrophe. Everything You Know about Indians Is Wrong is a highly entertaining and, at times, searing critique of the deeply disputed role of American Indians in the United States. In “A Place Called Irony,” Smith whizzes through his early life, showing us the ironic pop culture signposts that marked this Native American’s coming of age in suburbia: “We would order Chinese food and slap a favorite video into the machine—the Grammy Awards or a Reagan press conference—and argue about Cyndi Lauper or who should coach the Knicks.” In “Lost in Translation,” Smith explores why American Indians are so often misunderstood and misrepresented in today’s media: “We’re lousy television.” In “Every Picture Tells a Story,” Smith remembers his Comanche grandfather as he muses on the images of American Indians as “a half-remembered presence, both comforting and dangerous, lurking just below the surface.” 

Smith walks this tightrope between comforting and dangerous, offering unrepentant skepticism and, ultimately, empathy. “This book is called Everything You Know about Indians Is Wrong, but it’s a book title, folks, not to be taken literally. Of course I don’t mean everything, just most things. And ‘you’ really means we, as in all of us.”
First published in 1953, this book presents a description of sixteen of the larger medieval fortresses in the Peloponnese, occupied by the Venetians during the period 1685-1715. It is also a beautifully-written celebration of some of Greece's most striking, but also least studied, architectural monuments, inspired by a unique collection of seventeenth century fortification plans (the so-called "Grimani codex") preserved in the Gennadius Library of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. The author first saw the plans in 1948 and devoted the next four years of his life to a historical and archaeological investigation of the castles they depicted. At a time when most of the students at the American School were studying the classics, his interest in later Greek history was pioneering. He not only searched out hundreds of obscure documentary sources but also made a point of visiting, and personally describing and photographing, every castle - not an easy thing to do at the tail end of the Greek Civil War. The final publication was an instant classic, marked out by its evocative prose and Andrews' obvious fascination with the subject. As he wrote, "instead of the shining temple stones chiseled with the resources of perfection, these fortresses of medieval Greece crouch to the contours of the land with crumbling, roofless walls of rubble, built with the mark of haste, as if there were not time between one invasion and the next to build them." The book has been long out of print. This new edition presents Andrews' original text with a new introduction which sets the work in context and discusses some of the developments in Greek castle studies since the 1950s. The Grimani maps, originally printed only in black and white, are now presented in their original colors.
In the early twentieth century, Native American baskets, blankets, and bowls could be purchased from department stores, “Indian stores,” dealers, and the U.S. government’s Indian schools. Men and women across the United States indulged in a widespread passion for collecting Native American art, which they displayed in domestic nooks called “Indian corners.” Elizabeth Hutchinson identifies this collecting as part of a larger “Indian craze” and links it to other activities such as the inclusion of Native American artifacts in art exhibitions sponsored by museums, arts and crafts societies, and World’s Fairs, and the use of indigenous handicrafts as models for non-Native artists exploring formal abstraction and emerging notions of artistic subjectivity. She argues that the Indian craze convinced policymakers that art was an aspect of “traditional” Native culture worth preserving, an attitude that continues to influence popular attitudes and federal legislation.

Illustrating her argument with images culled from late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century publications, Hutchinson revises the standard history of the mainstream interest in Native American material culture as “art.” While many locate the development of this cross-cultural interest in the Southwest after the First World War, Hutchinson reveals that it began earlier and spread across the nation from west to east and from reservation to metropolis. She demonstrates that artists, teachers, and critics associated with the development of American modernism, including Arthur Wesley Dow and Gertrude Käsebier, were inspired by Native art. Native artists were also able to achieve some recognition as modern artists, as Hutchinson shows through her discussion of the Winnebago painter and educator Angel DeCora. By taking a transcultural approach, Hutchinson transforms our understanding of the role of Native Americans in modernist culture.

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