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Earn-lay atin-Lay? No, not that kind of Latin! You can learn trueLatin, with conjugations, declensions, and all those extrasyllables - and it's easier than you think.In fact, most people mistakenly think of learning Latin as perhapsthe most useless, tedious, and difficult thing to do on earth. Theycouldn't be more wrong.

Latin For Dummies takes you back for a quick jauntthrough the parlance of ancient Rome, as well as discussing theprogress of Latin into church language, and its status today as the"dead" language that lives on in English, Spanish,Italian, and most other Western tongues. Written for those withzero prior knowledge of Latin, this snappy guide puts the basics atyour fingertips and steers clear of the arcane, schoolmarmstereotype of endless declensions and Herculean translations.Easy-to-understand sections describe:
* Latin you already know
* Grammar
* Pronunciation
* Latin in action
* Latin in law
* Latin in medicine
* Latin for impressing your friends
* And much more

No dusty tome or other such artifact, Latin For Dummiesmakes learning fun and brings the language to life by presentingconversations in various Roman settings, as well as providing funfacts and stories about classical life. And if you feel you mayactually have a negative aptitude for the language, don'tworry; pronunciations and translations follow every expression, anda helpful mini-dictionary graces the book's last pages.You'll also find out about:
* The quotable Roman
* Latin graffiti
* Latin authors who's who
* Gladiator Latin
* Latin in love, marriage, and family
* From the mouth of Julius Caesar
* Romans on drink
* Helpful Latin-related Web sites
* Fun and games exercises

Designed to introduce and familiarize you with the languagerather than make you the next Cicero, Latin For Dummiesgives you all the tools you need to work at your own pace to learnas much or as little as you like. So noli timere (no-leetih-may-reh) - "have nofear" - and carpe diem ("pick upLatin For Dummies today")!
In its long history, the English language has had many lawmakers--those who have tried to regulate or otherwise organize the way we speak. Proper Words in Proper Places offers the first narrative history of these endeavors and shows clearly that what we now regard as the only "correct" way to speak emerged out of specific historical and social conditions over the course of centuries. As historian Jack Lynch has discovered, every rule has a human history and the characters peopling his narrative are as interesting for their obsession as for their erudition: the sharp-tongued satirist Jonathan Swift, who called for a government-sponsored academy to issue rulings on the language; the polymath Samuel Johnson, who put dictionaries on a new footing; the eccentric Hebraist Robert Lowth, the first modern to understand the workings of biblical poetry; the crackpot linguist John Horne Tooke, whose bizarre theories continue to baffle scholars; the chemist and theologian Joseph Priestly, whose political radicalism prompted violent riots; the ever-crotchety Noah Webster, who worked to Americanize the English language; the long-bearded lexicographer James A. H. Murray, who devoted his life to a survey of the entire language in the Oxford English Dictionary; and the playwright George Bernard Shaw, who worked without success to make English spelling rational.

Grammatical "rules" or "laws" are not like the law of gravity, or even laws against murder and theft--they're more like rules of etiquette, made by fallible people and subject to change. Witty, smart, full of passion for the world's language, Proper Words in Proper Places will entertain and educate in equal measure.
Introduction to Latin, Second Edition is an introductory Latin textbook designed with a streamlined flow that allows it to be completed in one year. Its concise and uncluttered approach gives students what they need to master the material. Grammar is integrated within the context of reading fluency. Innovative exercises provide translation practice as well as build “instinctive skills” that prepare students for reading authentic Latin works.

Features:

Concise, streamlined presentation focuses on what students need to know, allowing the material to be covered in a year, even for courses which meet only three days a week Innovative exercises that go beyond the usual translation practice, engaging students with the mechanisms of the language and developing “more instinctive” skills Succinct grammatical explanations that don’t overwhelm the students with superfluous detail while also providing help for students with little or no understanding of English grammar Latin readings from ancient sources in the form of both sentences and short passages allow for students to connect with authentic Latin Practical instructions often overlooked by other textbooks, including reading a dictionary entry, reading strategies, sentence patterns, gapping, and expectations

New to the Second Edition

Revised order of presentation that spreads material out more evenly between the first and second halves of the book Derivatives exercises added at the end of each chapter providing practice connecting English words with their Latin roots Bridge to next level: final three chapters provide review and include longer narrative readings with minimal editing to bridge students to the next level of Latin Revised selection of readings for more appropriate level of difficulty

First ever critical study of Tolkien’s little-known essay, which reveals how language invention shaped the creation of Middle-earth and beyond, to George R R Martin’s Game of Thrones.

J.R.R. Tolkien’s linguistic invention was a fundamental part of his artistic output, to the extent that later on in life he attributed the existence of his mythology to the desire to give his languages a home and peoples to speak them. As Tolkien puts it in ‘A Secret Vice’, ‘the making of language and mythology are related functions’’.

In the 1930s, Tolkien composed and delivered two lectures, in which he explored these two key elements of his sub-creative methodology. The second of these, the seminal Andrew Lang Lecture for 1938–9, ‘On Fairy-Stories’, which he delivered at the University of St Andrews in Scotland, is well known. But many years before, in 1931, Tolkien gave a talk to a literary society entitled ‘A Hobby for the Home’, where he unveiled for the first time to a listening public the art that he had both himself encountered and been involved with since his earliest childhood: ‘the construction of imaginary languages in full or outline for amusement’.

This talk would be edited by Christopher Tolkien for inclusion as ‘A Secret Vice’ in The Monsters and the Critics and Other Essays and serves as the principal exposition of Tolkien’s art of inventing languages. This new critical edition, which includes previously unpublished notes and drafts by Tolkien connected with the essay, including his ‘Essay on Phonetic Symbolism’, goes some way towards re-opening the debate on the importance of linguistic invention in Tolkien’s mythology and the role of imaginary languages in fantasy literature.

A bestselling linguist takes us on a lively tour of how the English language is evolving before our eyes -- and why we should embrace this transformation and not fight it

Language is always changing -- but we tend not to like it. We understand that new words must be created for new things, but the way English is spoken today rubs many of us the wrong way. Whether it’s the use of literally to mean “figuratively” rather than “by the letter,” or the way young people use LOL and like, or business jargon like What’s the ask? -- it often seems as if the language is deteriorating before our eyes.

But the truth is different and a lot less scary, as John McWhorter shows in this delightful and eye-opening exploration of how English has always been in motion and continues to evolve today. Drawing examples from everyday life and employing a generous helping of humor, he shows that these shifts are a natural process common to all languages, and that we should embrace and appreciate these changes, not condemn them.

Words on the Move opens our eyes to the surprising backstories to the words and expressions we use every day. Did you know that silly once meant “blessed”? Or that ought was the original past tense of owe? Or that the suffix -ly in adverbs is actually a remnant of the word like? And have you ever wondered why some people from New Orleans sound as if they come from Brooklyn?

McWhorter encourages us to marvel at the dynamism and resilience of the English language, and his book offers a lively journey through which we discover that words are ever on the move and our lives are all the richer for it.

Do you "know" that posh comes from an acronym meaning "port out, starboard home"? That "the whole nine yards" comes from (pick one) the length of a WWII gunner's belt; the amount of fabric needed to make a kilt; a sarcastic football expression? That Chicago is called "The Windy City" because of the bloviating habits of its politicians, and not the breeze off the lake? If so, you need this book. David Wilton debunks the most persistently wrong word histories, and gives, to the best of our actual knowledge, the real stories behind these perennially mis-etymologized words. In addition, he explains why these wrong stories are created, disseminated, and persist, even after being corrected time and time again. What makes us cling to these stories, when the truth behind these words and phrases is available, for the most part, at any library or on the Internet? Arranged by chapters, this book avoids a dry A-Z format. Chapters separate misetymologies by kind, including The Perils of Political Correctness (picnics have nothing to do with lynchings), Posh, Phat Pommies (the problems of bacronyming--the desire to make every word into an acronym), and CANOE (which stands for the Conspiracy to Attribute Nautical Origins to Everything). Word Myths corrects long-held and far-flung examples of wrong etymologies, without taking the fun out of etymology itself. It's the best of both worlds: not only do you learn the many wrong stories behind these words, you also learn why and how they are created--and what the real story is.
Is American English in decline? Are regional dialects dying out? Is there a difference between men and women in how they adapt to linguistic variations?

These questions, and more, about our language catapulted Robert MacNeil and William Cran—the authors (with Robert McCrum) of the language classic The Story of English—across the country in search of the answers. Do You Speak American? is the tale of their discoveries, which provocatively show how the standard for American English—if a standard exists—is changing quickly and dramatically.

On a journey that takes them from the Northeast, through Appalachia and the Deep South, and west to California, the authors observe everyday verbal interactions and in a host of interviews with native speakers glean the linguistic quirks and traditions characteristic of each area. While examining the histories and controversies surrounding both written and spoken American English, they address anxieties and assumptions that, when explored, are highly emotional, such as the growing influence of Spanish as a threat to American English and the special treatment of African-American vernacular English. And, challenging the purists who think grammatical standards are in serious deterioration and that media saturation of our culture is homogenizing our speech, they surprise us with unpredictable responses.

With insight and wit, MacNeil and Cran bring us a compelling book that is at once a celebration and a potent study of our singular language.


Each wave of immigration has brought new words to enrich the American language. Do you recognize the origin of


1. blunderbuss, sleigh, stoop, coleslaw, boss, waffle?

Or

2. dumb, ouch, shyster, check, kaput, scram, bummer?

Or

3. phooey, pastrami, glitch, kibbitz, schnozzle?

Or

4. broccoli, espresso, pizza, pasta, macaroni, radio?

Or

5. smithereens, lollapalooza, speakeasy, hooligan?

Or

6. vamoose, chaps, stampede, mustang, ranch, corral?











1. Dutch 2. German 3. Yiddish 4. Italian 5. Irish 6. Spanish
Do memories of your grammar lessons haunt you and other textbooks overwhelm you? Then Get Started in Latin is for you. Follow a Latin story set in a medieval monastery, where conspiracy unfolds in the cloisters, Vikings threaten to attack, and young lovers set out to unmask the villains. Sample some classical Latin too, and learn more about the authors who wrote it.

The free audio for this course is available to download to the Teach Yourself Library app, or to stream on library.teachyourself.com. The recording contains the story and the 'Living Latin' sections of the book, and will enhance your enjoyment of the poetry and give you an idea of what Latin sounded like.

Get Started in Latin is ideal for complete beginners because it introduces the language step by step through an interesting and humorous story. Each unit contains grammatical explanations and vocabulary support. There are plenty of exercises to practise each point as it is introduced and help you remember what you have learnt. There are two revision units so that you can check your progress and review areas of difficulty. 'About Latin' sections give lots of information about the history of the language and its influence upon English. 'Living Latin' sections contain pieces of authentic Latin, most of which is classical. They are included to give you an idea of what there is to enjoy once you have mastered the language and the translations are given.

Learn effortlessly with new, easy-to-read page design and interactive features:

NOT GOT MUCH TIME?
One- and ten-minute introductions to key principles to get you started.

AUTHOR INSIGHTS
Lots of instant help with common problems and quick tips for success, based on the author's many years of experience.

USEFUL VOCABULARY
Easy to find and learn, to build a solid foundation for understanding.

TEST YOURSELF
Tests in the book and online to keep track of your progress.

Ovid Unseens provides a bank of 80 practice passages of Latin verse, half elegiac and half hexameter.

Taken from across Ovid's works, including the Metamorphoses, Fasti, Heroides, Amores and Tristia, the passages help build students' knowledge and confidence in a notoriously difficult element of Latin language learning.

Every passage begins with an introduction, outlining the basic story and theme of the passage, followed by a 'lead-in' sentence, paraphrasing the few lines before the passage begins.

The first set of passages are translation exercises of 12-16 lines, each accompanied by a Discendum box which highlights a key feature of poetic Latin, equipping students further with the skills to tackle ever more difficult verse passages at first sight.

These are followed by longer passages with scansion exercises and questions on comprehension and stylistic analysis, replicating unseen verse exam questions in full.

The comprehensive introduction provides an overview of Ovid's life and work, an account of some of the stylistic features of his poetry, and practical help in the form of tips on how to approach the more challenging lines of Latin verse and produce a fluent translation.

A step-by-step guide to scansion, with practice exercises and answers, covers the essential principles for scanning lines of Latin verse, from the basics of understanding syllables, feet and types of metres, to coping with elision and caesurae. A guideline verse vocabulary list is provided which covers words particularly common in Ovid's works. Broken down into small 'checklists', each corresponding to a group of four passages, the vocabulary is learnt cumulatively and as it is encountered.
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