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Finally, the world’s greatest writer receives the scholarly Delphi treatment. This incredible eBook offers every Shakespearean play, poem, apocryphal work and much, much more! Now you can truly own all of Shakespeare’s works and a wealth of BONUS material on your eReader, and all in ONE well-organised file. (Version 6)

* concise introductions to the plays and other works
* images of how the plays first appeared in print, giving your eReader a taste of the Elizabethan texts
* ALL 38 plays and each with their own contents table – navigate easily between acts and scenes – find that special quotation quickly!
* even includes 17 apocryphal plays available nowhere else
* contains a special LOST PLAYS section, with concise information on Shakespeare’s lost works
* includes the special bonus play of DOUBLE FALSEHOOD
* ALL the sonnets and other poetry, with excellent formatting, in their own special contents table – find that special sonnet quickly and easily!
* packed full of hundreds of beautiful images relating to Shakespeare’s life, locations and works
* EVEN includes a special SOURCES section – spend hours discovering rare medieval texts that shaped Shakespeare’s greatest works.
* INCLUDES no less than 5 biographies – explore the bard’s mysterious life from multiple sources across history
* the SPECIAL literary criticism section boasts 11 works by writers as varied as Samuel Johnson, Coleridge, Pope, Bernard Shaw and Tolstoy
* scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres
* includes a special ‘Glossary of Elizabethan Language’, which will aid your comprehension of difficult words and phrases
* UPDATED with line numbers to all 38 plays, in response to customers’ requests
* UPDATED with a special Quotations section, with hundreds of famous quotations from the plays and poetry

This eBook is quite simply stunning and deserves a place in the digital library of all lovers of literature.

CONTENTS

The Plays
ALL 38 PLAYS

The Lost Plays
LOVE’S LABOUR’S WON
CARDENIO
DOUBLE FALSEHOOD

The Sources
LIST OF THE PLAYS’ SOURCES

The Apocryphal Plays
ARDEN OF FAVERSHAM
THE BIRTH OF MERLIN
KING EDWARD III
LOCRINE
THE LONDON PRODIGAL
THE PURITAN
THE SECOND MAIDEN’S TRAGEDY
SIR JOHN OLDCASTLE
THOMAS LORD CROMWELL
A YORKSHIRE TRAGEDY
SIR THOMAS MORE
FAIR EM
MUCEDORUS
THE MERRY DEVIL OF EDMONTON
EDMUND IRONSIDE
THOMAS OF WOODSTOCK
VORTIGERN AND ROWENA

The Adaptations
TALES FROM SHAKESPEARE BY CHARLES AND MARY LAMB

The Poetry
THE SONNETS
VENUS AND ADONIS
THE RAPE OF LUCRECE
THE PASSIONATE PILGRIM
THE PHOENIX AND THE TURTLE
A LOVER’S COMPLAINT

The Apocryphal Poetry
TO THE QUEEN
A FUNERAL ELEGY FOR MASTER WILLIAM PETER
SONNETS TO SUNDRY NOTES OF MUSIC

The Criticism
PREFACE TO SHAKESPEARE AND NOTES ON PLAY BY SAMUEL JOHNSON
NOTES TO COMEDIES BY SAMUEL JOHNSON
A STUDY OF SHAKESPEARE BY ALGERNON CHARLES SWINBURNE
and many more!

The Biographies
SHAKESPEARE: HIS LIFE, ART, AND CHARACTERS BY HENRY NORMAN HUDSON
and many more!

Shakespeare’s Last Will and Testament

Resources:
Quotations
Glossary of Elizabethan Language
Arguably the darkest of all Shakespeare’s plays, Macbeth is also one of the most challenging. Is it a work of nihilistic despair, “a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing”, or is it a cautionary tale warning of the dangers of Machiavellianism and relativism? Does it lead to hell and hopelessness, or does it point to a light beyond the darkness? This critical edition of Shakespeare’s classic psychological drama contains essays by some of today’s leading critics, exploring Macbeth as a morality play, as a history play with contemporary relevance, and as a drama that shows a vision of evil and that grapples with the problem of free will.

The Ignatius Critical Editions represent a tradition-oriented alternative to popular textbook series such as the Norton Critical Editions orOxford World Classics, and are designed to concentrate on traditional readings of the Classics of world literature. Whereas many modern critical editions have succumbed to the fads of modernism and post-modernism, this series will concentrate on tradition-oriented criticism of these great works. Edited by acclaimed literary biographer, Joseph Pearce, the Ignatius Critical Editions will ensure that traditional moral readings of the works are given prominence, instead of the feminist, or deconstructionist readings that often proliferate in other series of 'critical editions'. As such, they represent a genuine extension of consumer-choice, enabling educators, students and lovers of good literature to buy editions of classic literary works without having to 'buy into' the ideologies of secular fundamentalism. The series is particularly aimed at tradition-minded literature professors offering them an alternative for their students. The initial list will have about 15 - 20 titles. The goal is to release three books a season, or six in a year.

More William Shakespeare's eBook

The play spans only the last two years of Richard's life, from 1398 to 1400. The first Act begins with King Richard sitting majestically on his throne in full state, having been requested that he arbitrate a dispute between Thomas Mowbray and Richard's cousin, Henry Bolingbroke, who has accused Mowbray of squandering money given to him by Richard for the King's soldiers and of murdering his uncle, the Duke of Gloucester. Bolingbroke's father, John of Gaunt, meanwhile, believes it was Richard himself who was responsible for his brother's murder. After several attempts to calm both men, Richard acquiesces and Bolingbroke and Mowbray challenge each other to a duel, over the objections of both Richard and Gaunt.
The tournament scene is very formal with a long, ceremonial introduction, but as the combatants begin to fight, Richard interrupts and sentences both to banishment from England. Bolingbroke is originally sentenced to leave for ten years, but Richard changes this to six years, while Mowbray is banished permanently. The king's decision can be seen as the first mistake in a series leading eventually to his overthrow and death, since it is an error which highlights many of his character flaws, displaying as it does indecisiveness (both in terms of whether to allow the duel to go ahead and in terms of how long to exile Bolingbroke for), abruptness (Richard waits until the last possible moment to cancel the duel), and arbitrariness (there is no apparent reason why Bolingbroke should be allowed to return and Mowbray not). In addition, the decision fails to dispel the suspicions surrounding Richard's involvement in the death of the Duke of Gloucester - in fact, by handling the situation so high-handedly and offering no coherent explanation for his reasoning, Richard only manages to appear more guilty. Mowbray predicts that the king will sooner or later fall at the hands of Bolingbroke.
John of Gaunt dies and Richard II seizes all of his land and money. This angers the nobility, who accuse Richard of wasting England's money, of taking Gaunt's money (belonging by rights to his son, Bolingbroke) to fund war in Ireland, of taxing the commoners, and of fining the nobles for crimes committed by their ancestors. They then help Bolingbroke secretly return to England in a plan to overthrow Richard II. There remain, however, subjects who continue faithful to the King, among them Bushy, Bagot, Green and the Duke of Aumerle (son of the Duke of York), cousin of both Richard and Bolingbroke. When King Richard leaves England to administer the war in Ireland, Bolingbroke seizes the opportunity to assemble an army and invades the north coast of England. Executing both Bushy and Green, he wins over the Duke of York, whom Richard has left in charge of his government in his absence.
Upon Richard's return, Bolingbroke not only reclaims his lands but lays claim to the very throne. Crowning himself King Henry IV, he has Richard taken prisoner to the castle of Pomfret. Aumerle and others plan a rebellion against the new king, but York discovers his son's treachery and reveals it to Henry, who spares Aumerle as a result of the intercession of the Duchess of York while executing the other conspirators. After interpreting King Henry's "living fear" as a reference to the still-living Richard, an ambitious nobleman (Exton) goes to the prison and murders him. King Henry repudiates the murderer and vows to journey to Jerusalem to cleanse himself of his part in Richard's death.- - - From Wikipedia
 

The Tempest is a play by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written in 1610–11, and thought by many critics to be the last play that Shakespeare wrote alone. It is set on a remote island, where Prospero, the rightful Duke of Milan, plots to restore his daughter Miranda to her rightful place using illusion and skilful manipulation. He conjures up a storm, the eponymous tempest, to lure his usurping brother Antonio and the complicit King Alonso of Naples to the island. There, his machinations bring about the revelation of Antonio's lowly nature, the redemption of the King, and the marriage of Miranda to Alonso's son, Ferdinand.

There is no obvious single source for the plot of The Tempest, but researchers have seen parallels in Erasmus's Naufragium, Peter Martyr's De orbe novo, and eyewitness reports by William Strachey and Sylvester Jordain of the real-life shipwreck of the Sea Venture on the islands of Bermuda, and the subsequent conflict between Sir Thomas Gates and Sir George Somers. In addition, one of Gonzalo's speeches is derived from Montaigne's essay Of the Canibales, and much of Prospero's renunciative speech is taken word for word from a speech by Medea in Ovid's poem Metamorphoses. The masque in Act 4 may have been a later addition, possibly in honour of the wedding of Princess Elizabeth and Frederick V in 1613. The play was first published in the First Folio of 1623.

The story draws heavily on the tradition of the romance, and it was influenced by tragicomedy, the courtly masque and perhaps the commedia dell'arte. It differs from Shakespeare's other plays in its observation of a stricter, more organised neoclassical style. Critics see The Tempest as explicitly concerned with its own nature as a play, frequently drawing links between Prospero's "art" and theatrical illusion, and early critics saw Prospero as a representation of Shakespeare, and his renunciation of magic as signalling Shakespeare's farewell to the stage. The play portrays Prospero as a rational, and not an occultist, magician by providing a contrast to him in Sycorax: her magic is frequently described as destructive and terrible, where Prospero's is said to be wondrous and beautiful. Beginning in about 1950, with the publication of Psychology of Colonization by Octave Mannoni, The Tempest was viewed more and more through the lens of postcolonial theory—exemplified in adaptations like Aimé Césaire's Une Tempête set in Haiti—and there is even a scholarly journal on post-colonial criticism named after Caliban.

The Tempest did not attract a significant amount of attention before the ban on the performance of plays in 1642, and only attained popularity after the Restoration, and then only in adapted versions. In the mid-19th century, theatre productions began to reinstate the original Shakespearean text, and in the 20th century, critics and scholars undertook a significant re-appraisal of the play's value, to the extent that it is now considered to be one of Shakespeare's greatest works. It has been adapted numerous times in a variety of styles and formats: in music, at least 46 operas by composers such as Fromental Halévy, Zdeněk Fibich and Thomas Adès; orchestral works by Tchaikovsky, Arthur Sullivan and Arthur Honegger; and songs by such diverse artists as Ralph Vaughan Williams, Michael Nyman and Pete Seeger; in literature, Percy Bysshe Shelley's poem With a Guitar, To Jane and W. H. Auden's The Sea and the Mirror; novels by Aimé Césaire and The Diviners by Margaret Laurence; in paintings by William Hogarth, Henry Fuseli, and John Everett Millais; and on screen, ranging through a hand-tinted version of Herbert Beerbohm Tree's 1905 stage performance, the science fiction film Forbidden Planet in 1956, Peter Greenaway's 1991 Prospero's Books featuring John Gielgud as Prospero, to Julie Taymor's 2010 film version which changed Prospero to Prospera (as played by Helen Mirren), and Des McAnuff's 2010 Stratford Shakespeare Festival production which starred Christopher Plummer.
 
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