Similar ebooks

A New York Times bestseller

The original graphic novel adapted into the film Blue Is the Warmest Color, winner of the Palme d'Or at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival

In this tender, bittersweet, full-color graphic novel, a young woman named Clementine discovers herself and the elusive magic of love when she meets a confident blue-haired girl named Emma: a lesbian love story for the ages that bristles with the energy of youth and rebellion and the eternal light of desire.

First published in France by Glénat, the book has won several awards, including the Audience Prize at the Angoulême International Comics Festival, Europe's largest.

The live-action, French-language film version of the book, entitled Blue Is the Warmest Color, won the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival in May 2013. Directed by director Abdellatif Kechiche and starring Lea Seydoux and Adele Exarchopoulos, the film generated both wide praise and controversy. It will be released in the US through Sundance Selects/IFC Films.

Julie Maroh is an author and illustrator originally from northern France.

"Julie Maroh, who was just 19 when she started the comic, manages to convey the excitement, terror, and obsession of young love—and to show how wildly teenagers swing from one extreme emotion to the next ... Ultimately, Blue Is the Warmest Color is a sad story about loss and heartbreak, but while Emma and Clementine’s love lasts, it’s exhilarating and sustaining." —Slate.com

"A beautiful, moving graphic novel." —Wall Street Journal

"Blue Is the Warmest Color captures the entire life of a relationship in affecting and honest style." —Comics Worth Reading

"Delicate linework conveys wordless longing in this graphic novel about a lesbian relationship." —New York Times Book Review (Editor's Choice)

"A tragic yet beautifully wrought graphic novel." —Salon.com

"Love is a beautiful punishment in Maroh’s paean to confusion, passion, and discovery ... An elegantly impassioned love story." —Publishers Weekly (STARRED REVIEW)

"A lovely and wholehearted coming-out story ... the illustrations are infused with genuine, raw feeling. Wide-eyed Clementine wears every emotion on her sleeve, and teens will understand her journey perfectly." —Kirkus Reviews

"The electric emotions of falling in love and the difficult process of self-acceptance will resonate with all readers ... Maroh’s use of color is deliberate enough to be eye-catching in a world of grey tones, with Emma’s bright blue hair capturing Clementine’s imagination, but is used sparingly enough that it supports and blends naturally with the story." —Library Journal (STARRED REVIEW)

"It's not just the French who have a better handle on sexy material than Americans -- Canadians do, too ... Who's publishing it? Not an American publishing house but by Arsenal Pulp Press, a Canadian independent." —Los Angeles Times
A New York Times Bestseller
Selected as a 2017 ALA/YALSA Great Graphic Novel for Teens: Nonfiction

Award winning authors Jim Ottaviani and Leland Purvis present a historically accurate graphic novel biography of English mathematician and scientist Alan Turing in The Imitation Game.
 
English mathematician and scientist Alan Turing (1912–1954) is credited with many of the foundational principles of contemporary computer science. The Imitation Game presents a historically accurate graphic novel biography of Turing’s life, including his groundbreaking work on the fundamentals of cryptography and artificial intelligence. His code breaking efforts led to the cracking of the German Enigma during World War II, work that saved countless lives and accelerated the Allied defeat of the Nazis. While Turing’s achievements remain relevant decades after his death, the story of his life in post-war Europe continues to fascinate audiences today.
 
Award-winning duo Jim Ottaviani (the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Feynman and Primates) and artist Leland Purvis (an Eisner and Ignatz Award nominee and occasional reviewer for the Comics Journal) present a factually detailed account of Turing’s life and groundbreaking research—as an unconventional genius who was arrested, tried, convicted, and punished for being openly gay, and whose innovative work still fuels the computing and communication systems that define our modern world. Computer science buffs, comics fans, and history aficionados will be captivated by this riveting and tragic story of one of the 20th century’s most unsung heroes.
 Winner of the 2014 Ignatz Award for Outstanding Anthology!

QU33R, from editor Rob Kirby, features 241 pages of new comics from 33 contributors—legends and new faces alike.

In 2012, Justin Hall edited a book called No Straight Lines: Four Decades of Queer Comics, that took readers on a journey from the beginnings of LGBT comics history to the present day. QU33R is an all-new project featuring queer comics legends as well as new talents that picks up where No Straight Lines left off. We've set down our history, now QU33R shines a light on our future!

QU33R had its genesis in an all-color queer comic zine called THREE, which featured three stories by three creators or teams per issue. Rob Kirby published three installments of THREE annually from 2010 to 2012, and the series did well, garnering not only an Ignatz nomination for Outstanding Anthology or Collection but also earning Rob the Prism Comics Queer Press Grant in 2011.

Producing the anthology was immensely gratifying, but featuring just three comics and publishing only once per year meant a lot of cartoonists weren’t getting the exposure they deserved. The publishing opportunities for queer cartoonists and queer subject matter are still limited, even today, and Rob longed for a wider distribution than he was able to manage on his own. He approached Northwest Press about doing a bigger compendium of all-new work.

While THREE was happening, Justin Hall was preparing his book No Straight Lines: Four Decades of Queer Comics, which Fantagraphics published in the summer of 2012. No Straight Lines traced the history of queer comics from their humble beginnings in the late 60’s/early 70’s all the way up to the present. The book was a whopping, award-winning success. Rob got to thinking that a follow-up volume—a sort-of-sequel focusing on all new work—would seal the deal, informing the world at large that we are still here, still queer, and still producing fresh and innovative work. He wanted to include not only several queer comics veterans, but also some fresh new faces and a few folks who haven’t necessarily belonged to the orthodox "queer comics scene" but have been doing non-heteronormative work all along.

QU33R features over 240 pages of new comics from a cross-generational lineup of award-winning LGBTQ cartoonists:

Amanda Verwey (Manderz Totally Top Private Diary)
Andy Hartzell (Fox Bunny Funny, Xeric grant recipient Bread and Circuses)
Annie Murphy (Gay Genius, I Still Live)
Carlo Quispe (Uranus)
Carrie McNinch (You Don’t Get There From Here, The Assassin and the Whiner)
Christine Smith (The Princess)
Craig Bostick (Darby Crash, Go-Go Girl, Boy Trouble)
David Kelly (Rainy Day Recess: The Complete Steven’s Comics, Boy Trouble)
Diane DiMassa (Hothead Paisan: Homicidal Lesbian Terrorist)
Dylan "NDR" Edwards (Transposes, Politically InQueerect)
Ed Luce (Wuvable Oaf)Edie Fake (Gaylord Phoenix)
Eric Kostiuk Williams (Hungry Bottom Comics)
Eric Orner (The Mostly Unfabulous Social Life of Ethan Green)
Howard Cruse (Stuck Rubber Baby, Wendel, Barefootz)
Ivan Velez, Jr. (Tales of the Closet, Dead High Yearbook)
Jennifer Camper (Juicy Mother, Rude Girls and Dangerous Women, subGURLZ)
Jon Macy (Teleny and Camille, Fearful Hunter, Nefarismo)
Jose-Luis Olivares (Pansy Boy)
Justin Hall (No Straight Lines: Four Decades of Queer Comics, Glamazonia, True Travel Tales)
Kris Dresen (Manya, Max & Lily, She Said)
L. Nichols (Flocks, Jumbly Junkery)
Marian Runk (Not a Horse Girl, The Magic Hedge)
MariNaomi (Kiss and Tell: A Romantic Resume, Smoke in Your Eyes, Estrus Comics)
Michael Fahy (Boy Trouble)
Nicole Georges (Calling Dr. Laura, Invincible Summer)
Rick Worley (A Waste of Time)
Rob Kirby (THREE, Boy Trouble, Curbside)
Sasha Steinberg (Stonewall, Queerotica)
Sina Sparrow (Art Fag, Boy Crazy Boy)
Steve MacIsaac (Shirtlifter)
Terrance Griep (Scooby-Doo)
Tyler Cohen (Primahood)

Released by Northwest Press, which has been publishing quality LGBT-inclusive comics and graphic novels since 2010.

©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.