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A firsthand look at efforts to improve diversity in software and hackerspace communities

Hacking, as a mode of technical and cultural production, is commonly celebrated for its extraordinary freedoms of creation and circulation. Yet surprisingly few women participate in it: rates of involvement by technologically skilled women are drastically lower in hacking communities than in industry and academia. Hacking Diversity investigates the activists engaged in free and open-source software to understand why, despite their efforts, they fail to achieve the diversity that their ideals support.

Christina Dunbar-Hester shows that within this well-meaning volunteer world, beyond the sway of human resource departments and equal opportunity legislation, members of underrepresented groups face unique challenges. She brings together more than five years of firsthand research: attending software conferences and training events, working on message boards and listservs, and frequenting North American hackerspaces. She explores who participates in voluntaristic technology cultures, to what ends, and with what consequences. Digging deep into the fundamental assumptions underpinning STEM-oriented societies, Dunbar-Hester demonstrates that while the preferred solutions of tech enthusiasts—their “hacks” of projects and cultures—can ameliorate some of the “bugs” within their own communities, these methods come up short for issues of unequal social and economic power. Distributing “diversity” in technical production is not equal to generating justice.

Hacking Diversity reframes questions of diversity advocacy to consider what interventions might appropriately broaden inclusion and participation in the hacking world and beyond.

“An intense, immersive deep dive into a wild, dangerous, and unknown world, written with the pace and appeal of a great thriller. This is nonfiction at its very best.”—Lee Child

The true story of two doomed ships and a daring search-and-rescue operation that shines a light on the elite Coast Guard swimmers trained for the most dangerous ocean missions

In late September 2015, Hurricane Joaquin swept past the Bahamas and swallowed a pair of cargo vessels in its destructive path: El Faro, a 790-foot American behemoth with a crew of thirty-three, and the Minouche, a 230-foot freighter with a dozen sailors aboard. From the parallel stories of these ships and their final journeys, Tristram Korten weaves a remarkable tale of two veteran sea captains from very different worlds, the harrowing ordeals of their desperate crews, and the Coast Guard’s extraordinary battle against a storm that defied prediction.

When the Coast Guard received word from Captain Renelo Gelera that the Minouche was taking on water on the night of October 1, the servicemen on duty helicoptered through Joaquin to the sinking ship. Rescue swimmer Ben Cournia dropped into the sea—in the middle of a raging tropical cyclone, in the dark—and churned through the monstrous swells, loading survivors into a rescue basket dangling from the helicopter as its pilot struggled against the tempest. With pulsating narrative skill in the tradition of Sebastian Junger and Jon Krakauer, Korten recounts the heroic efforts by Cournia and his fellow guardsmen to haul the Minouche’s crew to safety.

Tragically, things would not go as well for Captain Michael Davidson and El Faro. Despite exhaustive searching by her would-be rescuers, the loss of the vessel became the largest U.S. maritime disaster in decades. As Korten narrates the ships’ fates, with insights drawn from insider access to crew members, Coast Guard teams, and their families, he delivers a moving and propulsive story of men in peril, the international brotherhood of mariners, and the breathtaking power of nature.

Praise for Into the Storm

“The story [Tristram] Korten tells is impressively multifaceted, exploring everything from timely issues such as climate change to timeless themes such as man’s struggle against the ocean’s fury.”—Miami New Times

“Into the Storm is a triumph of reporting and you-are-there writing that becomes a deeper tale—with more implications about our own lives—with every chapter.”—Robert Kurson, New York Times bestselling author of Shadow Divers
A vivid look at how India has developed the idea of entrepreneurial citizens as leaders mobilizing society and how people try to live that promise

Can entrepreneurs develop a nation, serve the poor, and pursue creative freedom, all while generating economic value? In Chasing Innovation, Lilly Irani shows the contradictions that arise as designers, engineers, and businesspeople frame development and governance as opportunities to innovate. Irani documents the rise of "entrepreneurial citizenship" in India over the past seventy years, demonstrating how a global ethos of development through design has come to shape state policy, economic investment, and the middle class in one of the world’s fastest-growing nations.

Drawing on her own professional experience as a Silicon Valley designer and nearly a decade of fieldwork following a Delhi design studio, Irani vividly chronicles the practices and mindsets that hold up professional design as the answer to the challenges of a country of more than one billion people, most of whom are poor. While discussions of entrepreneurial citizenship promise that Indian children can grow up to lead a nation aspiring to uplift the poor, in reality, social, economic, and political structures constrain whose enterprise, which hopes, and which needs can be seen as worthy of investment. In the process, Irani warns, powerful investors, philanthropies, and companies exploit citizens' social relations, empathy, and political hope in the quest to generate economic value. Irani argues that the move to recast social change as innovation, with innovators as heroes, frames others—craftspeople, workers, and activists—as of lower value, or even dangers to entrepreneurial forms of development.

With meticulous historical context and compelling stories, Chasing Innovation lays bare how long-standing power hierarchies such as class, caste, language, and colonialism continue to shape opportunity in a world where good ideas supposedly rule all.

In the past decade, South Africa's "miracle transition" has been interrupted by waves of protests in relation to basic services such as water and electricity. Less visibly, the post-apartheid period has witnessed widespread illicit acts involving infrastructure, including the nonpayment of service charges, the bypassing of metering devices, and illegal connections to services. Democracy’s Infrastructure shows how such administrative links to the state became a central political terrain during the antiapartheid struggle and how this terrain persists in the post-apartheid present. Focusing on conflicts surrounding prepaid water meters, Antina von Schnitzler examines the techno-political forms through which democracy takes shape.

Von Schnitzler explores a controversial project to install prepaid water meters in Soweto—one of many efforts to curb the nonpayment of service charges that began during the antiapartheid struggle—and she traces how infrastructure, payment, and technical procedures become sites where citizenship is mediated and contested. She follows engineers, utility officials, and local bureaucrats as they consider ways to prompt Sowetans to pay for water, and she shows how local residents and activists wrestle with the constraints imposed by meters. This investigation of democracy from the perspective of infrastructure reframes the conventional story of South Africa’s transition, foregrounding the less visible remainders of apartheid and challenging readers to think in more material terms about citizenship and activism in the postcolonial world.

Democracy’s Infrastructure examines how seemingly mundane technological domains become charged territory for struggles over South Africa’s political transformation.

What causes violent conflicts around the Middle East? All too often, the answer is sectarianism—popularly viewed as a timeless and intractable force that leads religious groups to conflict. In Everyday Sectarianism in Urban Lebanon, Joanne Nucho shows how wrong this perspective can be. Through in-depth research with local governments, NGOs, and political parties in Beirut, she demonstrates how sectarianism is actually recalibrated on a daily basis through the provision of essential services and infrastructures, such as electricity, medical care, credit, and the planning of bridges and roads.

Taking readers to a working-class, predominantly Armenian suburb in northeast Beirut called Bourj Hammoud, Nucho conducts extensive interviews and observations in medical clinics, social service centers, shops, banking coops, and municipal offices. She explores how group and individual access to services depends on making claims to membership in the dominant sectarian community, and she examines how sectarianism is not just tied to ethnoreligious identity, but also class, gender, and geography. Life in Bourj Hammoud makes visible a broader pattern in which the relationships that develop while procuring basic needs become a way for people to see themselves as part of the greater public.

Illustrating how sectarianism in Lebanon is not simply about religious identity, as is commonly thought, Everyday Sectarianism in Urban Lebanon offers a new look at how everyday social exchanges define and redefine communities and conflicts.

In the middle of the Mojave Desert, Las Vegas casinos use billions of gallons of water for fountains, pirate lagoons, wave machines, and indoor canals. Meanwhile, the town of Orme, Tennessee, must truck in water from Alabama because it has literally run out.

Robert Glennon captures the irony—and tragedy—of America’s water crisis in a book that is both frightening and wickedly comical. From manufactured snow for tourists in Atlanta to trillions of gallons of water flushed down the toilet each year, Unquenchable reveals the heady extravagances and everyday inefficiencies that are sucking the nation dry.

The looming catastrophe remains hidden as government diverts supplies from one area to another to keep water flowing from the tap. But sooner rather than later, the shell game has to end. And when it does, shortages will threaten not only the environment, but every aspect of American life: we face shuttered power plants and jobless workers, decimated fi sheries and contaminated drinking water.

We can’t engineer our way out of the problem, either with traditional fixes or zany schemes to tow icebergs from Alaska. In fact, new demands for water, particularly the enormous supply needed for ethanol and energy production, will only worsen the crisis. America must make hard choices—and Glennon’s answers are fittingly provocative. He proposes market-based solutions that value water as both a commodity and a fundamental human right.

One truth runs throughout Unquenchable: only when we recognize water’s worth will we begin to conserve it.
Thousands of people from more than eighty countries have traveled to China since 2001 to undergo fetal cell transplantation. Galvanized by the potential of stem and fetal cells to regenerate damaged neurons and restore lost bodily functions, people grappling with paralysis and neurodegenerative disorders have ignored the warnings of doctors and scientists back home in order to stake their futures on a Chinese experiment. Biomedical Odysseys looks at why and how these individuals have entrusted their lives to Chinese neurosurgeons operating on the forefront of experimental medicine, in a world where technologies and risks move faster than laws can keep pace. Priscilla Song shows how cutting-edge medicine is not just about the latest advances in biomedical science but also encompasses transformations in online patient activism, surgical intervention, and borderline experiments in health care bureaucracy.

Bringing together a decade of ethnographic research in hospital wards, laboratories, and online patient discussion forums, Song opens up important theoretical and methodological horizons in the anthropology of science, technology, and medicine. She illuminates how poignant journeys in search of fetal cell cures become tangled in complex webs of digital mediation, the entrepreneurial logics of postsocialist medicine, and fraught debates about the ethics of clinical experimentation.

Using innovative methods to track the border-crossing quests of Chinese clinicians and their patients from around the world, Biomedical Odysseys is the first book to map the transnational life of fetal cell therapies.

Carefully designed to balance coverage of theoretical and practical principles, Fundamentals of Water Treatment Unit Processes delineates the principles that support practice, using the unit processes approach as the organizing concept. The author covers principles common to any kind of water treatment, for example, drinking water, municipal wastewater, industrial water treatment, industrial waste water treatment, and hazardous wastes. Since technologies change but principles remain constant, the book identifies strands of theory rather than discusses the latest technologies, giving students a clear understanding of basic principles they can take forward in their studies.

Reviewing the historical development of the field and highlighting key concepts for each unit process, each chapter follows a general format that consists of process description, history, theory, practice, problems, references, and a glossary. This organizational style facilitates finding sections of immediate interest without having to page through an excessive amount of material.

Pedagogical Features

End-of-chapter glossaries provide a ready reference and add terms pertinent to topic but beyond the scope of the chapter Sidebars sprinkled throughout the chapters present the lore and history of a topic, enlarging students’ perspective Example problems emphasize tradeoffs and scenarios rather than single answers and involve spreadsheets Reference material includes several appendices and a quick-reference spreadsheet Solutions manual includes spreadsheets for problems Supporting material is available for download

Understanding how the field arrived at its present state of the art places the technology in a more logical context and gives students a strong foundation in basic principles. This book does more than build technical proficiency, it adds insight and understanding to the broader aspects of water treatment unit processes.

The late Professor Reds Wolman in his Foreword to the award-winning second edition said, "This is not your ordinary textbook. Environmental Hydrology is indeed a textbook, but five elements often found separately combine here in one text to make it different. It is eclectic, practical, in places a handbook, a guide to fieldwork, engagingly personal and occasionally opinionated. ... and, perhaps most engaging to me, in places the authors offer personal views as well as more strongly worded opinions. The former often relate to evaluation of alternative approaches, or formulations, of specific solutions to specific hydrologic problems."

The first and second editions were bestsellers and the third promises to educate people new to the field of hydrology and challenge professionals alike, with insightful solutions to classical problems as well as trendsetting approaches important to the evolving genre. The third edition enhances materials in the second edition and has expanded information on many topics, in particular, evapotranspiration, soil erosion, two-stage ditch design and applications, and stream processes.

What’s New in the Third Edition:

Presents new sections on rock structures in streams, hypoxia, harmful algal blooms, and agricultural practices to reduce nutrient discharges into water resources Enhances the format to aid the reader in finding tables, figures, and equations Contains more than 370 figures, 120 tables, 260 equations, 100 worked examples, 160 problems, and more than 1000 references

Collectively, the authors have more than 130 years of international experience and the addition of John Lyon and Suzette Burckhard as co-authors expands the breadth of knowledge presented in this book. More than 60 scientists and engineers in Australia, Canada, Europe, and the United States provided assistance to round out the offerings and ensure applicability to hydrology worldwide.

The brilliantly told and gripping story of the most familiar - yet, amazingly, still poorly understood - substance in the universe: Water.

The extent to which water remains a scientific mystery is extraordinary, despite its prevalence and central importance on Earth. Whether one considers its role in biology, its place in the physical world (where it refuses to obey the usual rules of liquids) or its deceptively simple structure, there is still no complete answer to the question: what is water? Philip Ball's book explains what, exactly, we do and do not know about the strange character of this most essential and ubiquitous of substances.

H20 begins by transporting its readers back to the Big Bang and the formation of galaxies to witness the birth of water's constituent elements: hydrogen and oxygen. It then explains how the primeval oceans were formed four billion years ago; where water is to be found on other planets; why ice floats when most solids sink; why, despite being highly corrosive, water is good for us; why there are at least fifteen kinds of ice and perhaps two kinds of liquid water; how scientists have consistently misunderstood water for centuries; and why wars have been waged over it.

Philip Ball's gloriously offbeat and intelligent book conducts us on a journey through the history of science, folklore, the wilder scientific fringes, cutting-edge physics, biology and ecology, to give a fascinating new perspective on life and the substance that sustains it. After reading this book, drinking a glass of water will never be the same again.

To properly operate a waterworks or wastewater treatment plant and to pass the examination for a waterworks/wastewater operator’s license, it is necessary to know how to perform certain calculations. All operators, at all levels of licensure, need a basic understanding of arithmetic and problem-solving techniques to solve the problems they typically encounter in the workplace.

Hailed on its first publication as a masterly account written in an engaging, highly readable, user-friendly style, the Mathematics Manual for Water and Wastewater Treatment Plant Operators, Second Edition has been expanded and divided into three specialized texts that contain hundreds of worked examples presented in a step-by-step format. They are ideal for all levels of water treatment operators in training and practitioners studying for advanced licensure. In addition, they provide a handy desk reference and handheld guide for daily use in making operational math computations.

This third volume, Wastewater Treatment Operations: Math Concepts and Calculations, covers computations commonly used in wastewater treatment with applied math problems specific to wastewater operations, allowing operators of specific unit processes to focus on their area of specialty. It explains calculations for flow, velocity, and pumping; preliminary and primary treatments; trickling filtration; rotating biological contactors; and chemical dosage. It also addresses various aspects of biosolids in wastewater, treatment ponds, and water/wastewater laboratory calculations. The text presents math operations that progressively advance to higher, more practical applications of mathematical calculations, including math operations that operators at the highest level of licensure would be expected to know and perform. To ensure correlation to modern practice and design, this volume provides illustrative problems for commonly used wastewater treatment operations found in today’s treatment facilities.
The fair allocation and wise use of fresh water presents significant challenges across the world. To avoid unresolvable crises in the future, judiciously managing water resources in the twenty-first century is fundamentally important. Integrating the underlying science of hydrology with real-world usage scenarios, Water Resources offers a nuanced, modern treatment of contemporary water resource management issues.

In this ground-breaking new text, renowned environmental scientist and educator George M. Hornberger and award-winning environmental engineer Debra Perrone examine the role of water resources in natural, social, and human-built systems, helping students understand and evaluate the complex tradeoffs required to achieve sustainable water management. Providing a much-needed educational tool that looks at freshwater resources within the context of the crucial water-energy-food nexus, the text

• includes a primer on the elements of physical hydrology necessary to understand resource availability;
• covers rivers, lakes, groundwater, and soil water;
• relates water to agriculture, energy, urbanization, and the environment;
• highlights connections between water quantity and quality;
• explains the economic and legal constraints around water resources;
• considers the impacts of climate change and population growth; and
• proposes paths forward for the sustainable use of water.

Teaching basic methods used to make informed water management decisions, the book includes illustrative quantitative calculations, qualitative think-pieces, and case studies. An appendix provides a review of units, dimensions, and conversions useful for addressing each chapter's example problems. Online answer keys are also available.

Positioned to become the foremost text on water resource issues, this companion to Hornberger's widely regarded Elements of Physical Hydrology reveals the enormity of the water crisis facing the planet while offering realistic hope.

Among the many diverse aspects of environmental science, none is more critical to the future of society and nature than water. Understanding the role of water on Earth and making good decisions regarding water conservation and hydrological hazards depends on learning the fundamentals of physical hydrology. This textbook, now in an expanded second edition, provides the clearest opportunity for students to absorb those fundamentals. Written at an introductory level, Elements of Physical Hydrology covers virtually every aspect of this subject, including:

• The hydrological cycle• Water budgets at catchment to global scales • Spatial and temporal aspects of precipitation• Evapotranspiration• Fluid dynamics and the Bernoulli equation• Laminar and turbulent flows• Open channel flow • Flood movement through reservoirs and channels • Flood frequency analysis• Groundwater flow• Aquifer characterization• Land subsidence• Soil moisture dynamics• Flow in the unsaturated zone• Hydrologic controls on vegetation • Biotic controls on hydrological processes• Runoff generation from surface and subsurface sources• Catchment models• The water-food-energy nexus• The globalization of water• Impacts of changing climate

Layering one topic upon the next, Elements of Physical Hydrology succeeds in moving from simple, easy-to-grasp explanations though equations and models in a manner that will leave students new to the topic eager to apply their knowledge. Professionals in related disciplines will also find this book ideal for self-study. Thoughtfully illustrated, carefully written, and covering a broad spectrum of topics, this classic text clarifies a subject that is often misunderstood and oversimplified.

-- Keith Loague
The Clean Water Act, with its emphasis on storm water and sediment control in urban areas, has created a compelling need for information in small-catchment hydrology. Design Hydrology and Sedimentology for Small Catchments provides the basic information and techniques required for understanding and implementing design systems to control runoff, erosion, and sedimentation. It will be especially useful to those involved in urban and industrial planning anddevelopment, surface mining activities, storm water management, sediment control, and environmental management.
This class-tested text, which presents many solved problems throughout as well as solutions at the end of each chapter, is suitable for undergraduate, graduate, and continuing education courses. In addition, practicing professionals will find it a valuable reference.
Anderson/Woessner: APPLIED GROUNDWATER MODELING (1992)
Shuirman/Slosson: FORENSIC ENGINEERING (1992)
de Marsily: QUANTITATIVE HYDROGEOLOGY (1986)
Selley: APPLIED SEDIMENTOLOGY, THIRD EDITION (1988)
Huyakorn: COMPUTATIONAL METHODS IN SUBSURFACE FLOW (1986)
Pinder: FINITE ELEMENT MODELING IN SURFACE AND SUBSURFACE HYDROLOGY (1977)

Key Features
* Covers major new improvements and state-of-the-art technologies in sediment control technology
* Provides in-depth information on estimating the impact of land-use changes on runoff and flood flows, as well as on estimating erosion and sediment yield from small catchments
* Presents superior coverage on design of flood and sediment detention ponds and design of runoff and sediment control measures
Numerical calculations are inevitably required in the field of hydrogeology and play a significant role in dealing with its various aspects. As often as not, students are seen struggling while solving numerical problems based on hydrogeology, as they find difficulty in identifying the correct concept behind the problem and the formula that can be applied to it. Also, there is a dearth of books, which help the readers in solving numerical problems of varied difficulty level and enable them to have a firm grounding in the subject of hydrogeology. The book Hydrogeology: Problems with Solutions fills this void in the finest way, and as desired, chiefly focuses on the sequential steps involved in solving the problems based on hydrogeology. It concisely covers the fundamental concepts, advanced principles and applications of hydrogeological tasks rather than overemphasising the theoretical aspects.

The text comprises sixty solved hydrogeological problems, which are logically organised into ten chapters, including hydrological cycle, morphometric analysis, hydrological properties, groundwater flow, well hydraulics, well design and construction, groundwater management, seawater intrusion, groundwater exploration and groundwater quality. The practice of pedagogy of hydrogeology in yesteryears was a two-tier approach of theoretical principles with toy problems and in-situ case studies for research start-up. This book bridges the gap between routine problem-solving and state-of-the-practice for future.



The book is primarily intended for the undergraduate and postgraduate students of Earth Sciences, Civil Engineering, Water Resources Engineering, Hydrogeology and Hydrology. It also serves as an excellent handy reference for all professionals.KEY FEATURES
• Key Concept succinctly explores the models, methods and theoretical concepts related to each problem.
• Necessary equations and formulae are specified.
• Appendices and Glossary are included, leaving no scope to refer any other book.
• Bibliography broadens the scope of the book.
Groundwater represents an important supply source for municipal and irrigation uses in Far West Texas. The City of El Paso receives about 50 percent of its municipal water supply from surface water and 50 percent from local groundwater. Groundwater pumping in El Paso is from the Hueco Bolson and the Mesilla Bolson. Historic groundwater pumping in the Texas portion of the Mesilla Bolson has not resulted in significant changes in groundwater levels or groundwater quality in existing wells. Historic pumping in the Hueco Bolson has resulted in lowered groundwater levels and brackish groundwater intrusion. The groundwater level declines have resulted in the intrusion of brackish groundwater into areas that historically pumped fresh groundwater. A 1979 assessment concluded that El Paso would deplete fresh groundwater in the Hueco Bolson by 2030 if groundwater pumping continued to increase. Partly as a result of the 1979 assessment, El Paso reduced its groundwater pumping from the Hueco Bolson by increasing surface water diversions from the Rio Grande, increasing conservation efforts, and increasing reclaimed water use. As a result, groundwater levels in many parts of the Hueco Bolson have stabilized. Brackish groundwater intrusion remains an issue, and is being addressed with a brackish groundwater desalination plant, currently under construction. The new wells and existing wells that will supply this desalination plant will also assist in the management of brackish groundwater intrusion by intercepting the brackish groundwater before it can flow towards existing fresh groundwater wells. The 2006 Far West Texas Regional Water Plan contemplates a groundwater transfer project to meet increasing demands in El Paso County beginning about 2030, mostly from the Dell City area in Hudspeth County, Texas. Groundwater management in the Dell City area is governed by a groundwater conservation district that has established limits on groundwater pumping based on existing and historic uses. Groundwater pumping for irrigation began in the Dell City area in 1948, and groundwater levels have been essentially stable for since the 1980s. Future planning for a groundwater transfer project will require a detailed understanding of the hydrogeology of the groundwater in the Dell City area.
It has been more than ten years since the last edition of the bestselling Restoration and Management of Lakes and Reservoirs. In that time, lake and reservoir management and restoration technologies have evolved and an enhanced version of this standard resource is long overdue. Completely revised and updated, the third edition continues the tradition of providing comprehensive coverage of the chemical, physical, and biological processes of eutrophication and its control. The authors describe the eutrophication process, outline methods for developing a pre-management and restoration diagnosis-feasibility study, and provide detailed descriptions of scientifically sound management and restoration methods.

See what’s new in the Third Edition:

• New chapters on aquatic plant ecology and management

• Emphasis on freshwater availability

• A regional framework for water quality attainment

• Methods of lake and reservoir restoration and management

• Updates or revisions to all other chapters

The book features in-depth discussions of techniques used to manage eutrophication in standing water bodies, procedures for using these techniques, the principles involved, and successes and failures through a selection of case studies and cost analyses. Each chapter includes an introduction to the scientific basis of the problem, a description of the methods and procedures, and presents several case histories. Potential negative impacts and costs, where known, are described. A useful classroom text, reference manual, and general guide, this is the text against which all other resources in this field are measured.

From the Yangtze to the Yellow River, China is traversed by great waterways, which have defined its politics and ways of life for centuries. Water has been so integral to China’s culture, economy, and growth and development that it provides a window on the whole sweep of Chinese history. In The Water Kingdom, renowned writer Philip Ball opens that window to offer an epic and powerful new way of thinking about Chinese civilization.

Water, Ball shows, is a key that unlocks much of Chinese culture. In The Water Kingdom, he takes us on a grand journey through China’s past and present, showing how the complexity and energy of the country and its history repeatedly come back to the challenges, opportunities, and inspiration provided by the waterways. Drawing on stories from travelers and explorers, poets and painters, bureaucrats and activists, all of whom have been influenced by an environment shaped and permeated by water, Ball explores how the ubiquitous relationship of the Chinese people to water has made it an enduring metaphor for philosophical thought and artistic expression. From the Han emperors to Mao, the ability to manage the waters ― to provide irrigation and defend against floods ― was a barometer of political legitimacy, often resulting in engineering works on a gigantic scale. It is a struggle that continues today, as the strain of economic growth on water resources may be the greatest threat to China’s future.

The Water Kingdom offers an unusual and fascinating history, uncovering just how much of China’s art, politics, and outlook have been defined by the links between humanity and nature.
Sustainable management of water resources is quickly increasing in importance on a global scale. An important piece of the puzzle is the characterization of marine water and determining its importance to geochemical budgets. To do this, submarine groundwater discharges must be carefully studied. Comprehensively exploring the subject, Submarine Groundwater presents quantitative data relating groundwater contribution to the water/salt balance of regional and global bodies of water.

The authors examine different data-supported methods for studying submarine groundwater flow and discharge through case studies contributed by leading international scientists. They discuss the maintenance of optimal water, salt, temperature and hydrobiological regimes of inland seas and large lakes. The book covers subsurface water exchange between the land and sea as well as groundwater discharge to the seas. It also provides a review of experimental methods and numerical modeling that can be used for the evaluation of specific discharge data and the effect of groundwater on the salt balance of seas and oceans.

Defining the field of marine hydrogeology as a science that studies submarine groundwater, its properties, circulation, and distribution, Submarine Groundwater delineates the role of quantitative assessment of subsurface water exchange between land and sea in predicting its changes under the influence of natural factors and human activity. It provides a framework for assessing different methods and making the best choice for various situations.

Produced waterâ€"water from underground formations that is brought to the surface during oil and gas productionâ€"is the greatest volume byproduct associated with oil and gas production. It is managed by some combination of underground injection, treatment and subsequent use, treatment and discharge, or evaporation, subject to compliance with state and federal regulations. Management of these waters is challenging not only for industry and regulators, but also for landowners and the public because of differences in the quality and quantity of produced water, varying infrastructure needs, costs, and environmental considerations associated with produced water disposal, storage, and transport.

Unconventional oil and gas development involves technologies that combine horizontal drilling with the practice of hydraulic fracturing. Hydraulic fracturing is a controlled, high-pressure injection of fluid and proppant into a well to generate fractures in the rock formation containing the oil or gas. After the hydraulic fracture procedure is completed, the injected fluid is allowed to flow back into the well, leaving the proppant in the newly created fractures. As a result, a portion of the injected water returns to the surface and this water is called “flowback water†which initially may mix with the naturally occurring produced water from the formation. The chemistry and volume of water returning to the surface from unconventional oil and gas operations thus changes during the lifetime of the well due to the amount of fluid used in the initial stage of well development, the amount of water naturally occurring in the geologic formation, the original water and rock chemistry, the type of hydrocarbon being produced, and the way in which production is conducted. The volume and composition of flowback and produced waters vary with geography, time, and site-specific factors.

A workshop was conducted by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to highlight the challenges and opportunities associated in managing produced water from unconventional hydrocarbon development, and particularly in the area of potential beneficial uses for these waters. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

Filling a long-standing need for a desk reference that synthesizes current research, Land Use Effects on Streamflow and Water Quality in the Northeastern United States reviews and discusses the impact of forest management, agriculture, and urbanization. The book provides a gateway to the diverse scientific literature that is urgently needed to understand and solve ubiquitous watershed management problems. The authors use an in-depth approach that focuses on the science behind sound management principles and practices.

The book begins with a summary of the scientific principles and processes that define and govern the interactions between activities on land and conditions in streams, lakes, and estuaries. Building on these principles, later chapters progress from basic science to small-scale, controlled field experiments to landscape-scale studies and their watershed management implications. This nested format parallels the development of watershed management projects and solutions. The deliberate integration of land use history, ecology, hydrology, chemistry, and resource management avoids the artificial separation of inter-related watershed characteristics and tracks causes and effects over realistic time scales.

The authors present the hydrologic and water quality principles on which to construct management plans for water supply watersheds across a wide range of sizes, configurations, and time scales. Rigorously reviewed by a distinguished panel of scientists and watershed managers, the book benefits from their collective experience across the full range of watershed science and management. It provides a diverse audience with the opportunity to update and expand their knowledge in critical areas of watershed science and management.

From the mysterious depths of Lake Vostok, Antarctica, to tropical floodplain lakes, inland seas, hydro-reservoirs and the variety of waterbodies in our local environment, lakes encompass a huge diversity of shapes, sizes, depths, colours, and even salinities. Often very large and very deep, they sustain important and unique ecosystems which can be hotspots of biodiversity, and are used by humans as sources of drinking water and food, in particular, fish. What is the origin of differences among lakes, and how does that affect the life within them? What are the seasons of a lake, and how do human actions alter lake ecosystems locally, and at a global scale? In this Very Short Introductions, Warwick Vincent outlines the essential features of lake environments and their biology, offering an up-to-date view of lake ecosystems. Vincent traces the origins of lake science (limnology) from the seminal work of François Forel on Lake Geneva at the edge of the Swiss Alps, to modern approaches such as environmental sensors, satellite observations, stable isotope analysis, and DNA-based technologies which are used to probe the microbial life support systems that lead from sunlight to fish. Drawing on varied case studies he considers the intimate relationship between humans and lakes, the value of lakes as indicators of environmental change, the impact of pollution,and our urgent need to improve the protection and management of these vitally important living resources via an integrated understanding of their ecology. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.
The availability of fresh water is potentially one of the most pervasive crises of the coming century. Water-related decisions will determine the future of major ecosystems, the health of regional economies, and the political stability of nations. A vigorous program of research in hydrologic sciences can provide the basis for sound water management at local, regional, national, and international levels.

The Committee on Hydrologic Science was established by the National Research Council in 1999 to identify priorities for hydrologic science that will ensure its vitality as a scientific discipline in service of societal needs. This charge will be performed principally through a series of studies that provide scientific advice on the hydrologic aspects of national program and U.S. hydrologic contributions to international programs.

This first report contains a preliminary assessment of the hydrologic science content of the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP). Because this is a short and focused report, little effort is spent to reaffirm the established and successful elements of the USGCRP. In fact, the Committee generally endorses the findings of the National Research Council (NRC) report Global Environmental Change: Research Pathways for the Next Decade (NRC, 1998a; the so-called Pathways report) in this respect. Instead the attention here is directed toward the most critical missing hydrologic science elements in the FY2000 USGCRP. This brings the focus to the terrestrial component of the water cycle. The integrative nature of terrestrial hydrology could significantly strengthen the USGCRP.

Handbook of Water and Wastewater Treatment Plant Operations the first thorough resource manual developed exclusively for water and wastewater plant operators has been updated and expanded. An industry standard now in its third edition, this book addresses management issues and security needs, contains coverage on pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), and includes regulatory changes. The author explains the material in layman’s terms, providing real-world operating scenarios with problem-solving practice sets for each scenario. This provides readers with the ability to incorporate math with both theory and practical application. The book contains additional emphasis on operator safety, new chapters on energy conservation and sustainability, and basic science for operators.

What’s New in the Third Edition:

Prepares operators for licensure exams Provides additional math problems and solutions to better prepare users for certification exams Updates all chapters to reflect the developments in the field Enables users to properly operate water and wastewater plants and suggests troubleshooting procedures for returning a plant to optimum operation levels

A complete compilation of water science, treatment information, process control procedures, problem-solving techniques, safety and health information, and administrative and technological trends, this text serves as a resource for professionals working in water and wastewater operations and operators preparing for wastewater licensure exams. It can also be used as a supplemental textbook for undergraduate and graduate students studying environmental science, water science, and environmental engineering.

Dryland degradation and desertification now affect almost a billion people around the world. Tragically, the biological resources and productivity of millions of acres of land are lost to desertification each year because people remain unaware of strategies and techniques that could improve yields, reduce risk, and begin healing the world's deserts. A Guide for Desert and Dryland Restoration is the first book to offer practical, field-tested solutions to this critical problem.

Author David Bainbridge has spent more than 25 years actively involved in restoring lands across the American Southwest. A Guide for Desert and Dryland Restoration presents the results of his years of fieldwork, as well as research and experience from scientists and practitioners around the globe.

The book discusses the ecology of desert plants, explores the causes of desertification and land abuse, and outlines the processes and procedures needed to evaluate, plan, implement, and monitor desert restoration projects. It sets forth economical and practical field-tested solutions for understanding site characteristics, selecting and growing plants, and ensuring that they survive with a minimal amount of water and care. Each chapter represents a guide to a critical topic for environmental restoration; extensive photographs, diagrams and drawings give detailed information for immediate application, and additional resources are included in appendixes.

A Guide for Desert and Dryland Restoration is the first comprehensive book focused on restoring arid regions, and clearly demonstrates that arid lands can be successfully rehabilitated. In addition to restorationists, the book will be an invaluable resource for anyone working in arid lands, including farmers, ranchers, gardeners, landscapers, outdoor recreation professionals, and activists.

Provocative, passionate and populist, RMB Manifestos are short and concise non-fiction books of literary, critical, and cultural studies.

The Columbia River Treaty: A Primer is a vital work that clearly explains the nature of this complex water agreement between Canada and the United States and how its impending update will impact communities, landscapes, industry and water supplies between the two countries for many years to come.

The Columbia River Treaty ratification in 1964 created the largest hydropower project in North America, with additional emphasis on flood protection for the USA. As the Treaty approaches its 60th anniversary, and the first opportunity for modification, its signatories are preparing proposals for new ways forward, and stakeholders on both sides of the border are speaking up.

This primer explores the initial intent of the Treaty and its success to date, its costs to Columbia Basin residents and ecosystems, and new influences the signatories must now consider. Shifts in social norms related to the environment, equity and social justice, new views on the relevance of Indigenous traditional and local knowledge, and the economic and physical effects of a changing climate – are all considered as factors in future Treaty governance. The primer concludes with a summary of the perspectives that currently exist between and within each country with respect to Treaty benefits and outlines the next steps that will take place in the negotiation process. The authors conclude with a call to action, in the hope that a renewed Columbia River Treaty might prove a model for outstanding transboundary water agreements around the world as they strive to meet not only the challenges of the present day but also the needs of future generations.

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