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When Isaac Newton died in 1727 without a will, he left behind a wealth of papers that, when examined, gave his followers and his family a deep sense of unease. Some of what they contained was wildly heretical and alchemically obsessed, hinting at a Newton altogether stranger and less palatable than the one enshrined in Westminster Abbey as the paragon of English rationality. These manuscripts had the potential to undermine not merely Newton's reputation, but that of the scientific method he embodied. They were immediately suppressed as "unfit to be printed," and, aside from brief, troubling glimpses spread across centuries, the papers would remain hidden from sight for more than seven generations. In The Newton Papers, Sarah Dry illuminates the tangled history of these private writings over the course of nearly three hundred years, from the long span of Newton's own life into the present day. The writings, on subjects ranging from secret alchemical formulas to impassioned rejections of the Holy Trinity, would eventually come to light as they moved through the hands of relatives, collectors, and scholars. The story of their disappearance, dispersal, and rediscovery is populated by a diverse cast of characters who pursued and possessed the papers, from economist John Maynard Keynes to controversial Jewish Biblical scholar Abraham Yahuda. Dry's captivating narrative moves between these varied personalities, depicting how, as they chased the image of Newton through the thickets of his various obsessions, these men became obsessed themselves with the allure of defining the "true" Newton. Dry skillfully accounts for the ways with which Newton's pursuers have approached his papers over centuries. Ultimately, The Newton Papers shows how Newton has been made and re-made throughout history by those seeking to reconcile the cosmic contradictions of an extraordinarily complex man.
Introduction to Solid State Physics, in its Second Edition, provides a comprehensive introduction to the physical properties of crystalline solids. It explains the structure of crystals, theory of crystal diffraction and the reciprocal lattice. As the book advances, it describes different kinds of imperfections in crystals, bonding in solids, and vibration in one-dimensional monoatomic and diatomic linear lattice. Different theories of specific heat, thermal conductivity of solids and lattice thermal conductivity are thoroughly dealt with. Coverage also includes the free electron theory, band theory of solids and semiconductors. In addition, the book also describes in detail the magnetic properties of solids and superconductivity. Finally, the book includes discussions on lasers, nanotechnology and the basic principles of fibre optics and holography. Some new topics like cellular method, quantum Hall effect, de Haas van Alphen effect, Pauli paramagnetism and semiconductor laser have been added in the present edition of the book to make it more useful for the students.

The book is designed to meet the requirements of undergraduate and postgraduate students of physics for their courses in solid state physics, condensed matter physics and material science.

KEY FEATURES
• Puts a conceptual emphasis on the subject.
• Includes numerous diagrams and figures to clarify the concepts.
• Gives step-by-step explanations of theories.
• Provides chapter-end exercises to test the knowledge acquired.

 

Named a Top Five Book of 2012 by Physics Today, USA.Philip Anderson was educated at University High School in Urbana, Illinois, at Harvard (BS 1943, PhD 1949), and further educated at Bell Laboratories, where his career (1949-1984) coincided with the greatest period of that remarkable institution. Starting in 1967, he shared his time with Cambridge University (until 1975) and then with Princeton, where he continued full time as Joseph Henry Professor until 1997. As an emeritus he remains active in research, and at press time he was involved in several scientific controversies about high profile subjects, in which his point of view, though unpopular at the moment, is likely to prevail eventually. His colleagues have made him one of the two physicists most often cited in the scientific literature, for several decades.His work is characterized by mathematical simplicity combined with conceptual depth, and by profound respect for experimental findings. He has explored areas outside his main discipline, the quantum theory of condensed matter (for which he won the 1977 Nobel Prize), on several occasions: his paper on what is now called the “Anderson-Higgs mechanism” was a main source for Peter Higgs' elucidation of the boson; a crucial insight led to work on the dynamics of neutron stars (pulsars); and his concept of the spin glass led far afield, to developments in practical computer algorithms and neural nets, and eventually to his involvement in the early years of the Santa Fe Institute and his co-leadership with Kenneth Arrow of two influential workshops on economics at that institution. His writing career started with a much-quoted article in Science titled “More is Different” in 1971; he was an occasional columnist for Physics Today in the 1980s and 1990s. He was more recently a reviewer of science and science-related books for the Times (London) Higher Education Supplement as well as an occasional contributor to Science, Nature, and other journals.
This revised and updated Fourth Edition of the text builds on the strength of previous edition and gives a systematic and clear exposition of the fundamental principles of solid state physics. The text covers the topics, such as crystal structures and chemical bonds, semiconductors, dielectrics, magnetic materials, superconductors, and nanomaterials. What distinguishes this text is the clarity and precision with which the author discusses the principles of physics, their relations as well as their applications. With the introduction of new sections and additional information, the fourth edition should prove highly useful for the students. This book is designed for the courses in solid state physics for B.Sc. (Hons.) and M.Sc. students of physics. Besides, the book would also be useful to the students of chemistry, material science, electrical/electronic and allied engineering disciplines. New to the Fourth Edition • Solved examples have been introduced to explain the fundamental principles of physics. • Matrix representation for symmetry operations has been introduced in Chapter 1 to enable the use of Group Theory for treating crystallography. • A section entitled ‘Other Contributions to Heat Capacity’, has been introduced in Chapter 5. • A statement on ‘Kondo effect (minimum)’ has been added in Chapter 14. • A section on ‘Graphenes’ has been introduced in Chapter 16. • The section on ‘Carbon Nanotubes’, in Chapter 16 has been revised. • A “Lesson on Group Theory”, has been added as Appendix.
At least 10 years have elapsed since a comprehensive monograph concer ned with the broad subject of cryogenics has been published. During this time a considerable quantity of research and development has been carried out in the field of cryogenics. Furthermore, there has been a certain degree of redirection of effort within the field, mostly driven by the variety of new applications, ranging from superconductive magnet systems to micro electronics. Greater emphasis is now being placed on low-temperature cryogenics, particularly that of liquid helium. Until now cryogenic books have provided a broad survey of materials and fluid properties over the entire cryogenic regime, T ::5 150 K. This approach does not allow sufficient detail in any particular area to bring the reader to the current level of understanding in the subject. In addition, the behavior of helium has been lumped with that of other cryogenic fluids, although the properties of helium are quite unique. As a result, a clear relationship has not been established between the fundamental understanding of helium fluids and their potential applications. The present book has been written to fill this void. The approach is to survey the field of cryogenics, specifically as it pertains to helium fluids. This approach is more specialized than that contained in previous cryogenics books. Furthermore, the level of treatment is more advanced and a certain knowledge of fundamental engineering and physics principles has been assumed.
The ideal textbook for a one-semester introductory course for graduate students or advanced undergraduates

This book provides an essential introduction to the physics of quantum many-body systems, which are at the heart of atomic and nuclear physics, condensed matter, and particle physics. Unlike other textbooks on the subject, it covers topics across a broad range of physical fields—phenomena as well as theoretical tools—and does so in a simple and accessible way.

Edward Shuryak begins with Feynman diagrams of the quantum and statistical mechanics of a particle; in these applications, the diagrams are easy to calculate and there are no divergencies. He discusses the renormalization group and illustrates its uses, and covers systems such as weakly and strongly coupled Bose and Fermi gases, electron gas, nuclear matter, and quark-gluon plasmas. Phenomena include Bose condensation and superfluidity. Shuryak also looks at Cooper pairing and superconductivity for electrons in metals, liquid 3He, nuclear matter, and quark-gluon plasma. A recurring topic throughout is topological matter, ranging from ensembles of quantized vortices in superfluids and superconductors to ensembles of colored (QCD) monopoles and instantons in the QCD vacuum.

Proven in the classroom, Quantum Many-Body Physics in a Nutshell is the ideal textbook for a one-semester introductory course for graduate students or advanced undergraduates.

Teaches students how quantum many-body systems work across many fields of physics
Uses path integrals from the very beginning
Features the easiest introduction to Feynman diagrams available
Draws on the most recent findings, including trapped Fermi and Bose atomic gases
Guides students from traditional systems, such as electron gas and nuclear matter, to more advanced ones, such as quark-gluon plasma and the QCD vacuum
This multi-contributor handbook discusses Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE), an epitaxial deposition technique which involves laying down layers of materials with atomic thicknesses on to substrates. It summarizes MBE research and application in epitaxial growth with close discussion and a ‘how to’ on processing molecular or atomic beams that occur on a surface of a heated crystalline substrate in a vacuum.

MBE has expanded in importance over the past thirty years (in terms of unique authors, papers and conferences) from a pure research domain into commercial applications (prototype device structures and more at the advanced research stage). MBE is important because it enables new device phenomena and facilitates the production of multiple layered structures with extremely fine dimensional and compositional control. The techniques can be deployed wherever precise thin-film devices with enhanced and unique properties for computing, optics or photonics are required. This book covers the advances made by MBE both in research and mass production of electronic and optoelectronic devices. It includes new semiconductor materials, new device structures which are commercially available, and many more which are at the advanced research stage.

Condenses fundamental science of MBE into a modern reference, speeding up literature reviewDiscusses new materials, novel applications and new device structures, grounding current commercial applications with modern understanding in industry and research Coverage of MBE as mass production epitaxial technology enhances processing efficiency and throughput for semiconductor industry and nanostructured semiconductor materials research community
This book presents a comprehensive overview of microrheology, emphasizing the underlying theory, practical aspects of its implementation, and current applications to rheological studies in academic and industrial laboratories. The field of microrheology continues to evolve rapidly, and applications are expanding at an accelerating pace. Readers will learn about the key methods and techniques, including important considerations to be made with respect to the materials most amenable to microrheological characterization and pitfalls to avoid in measurements and analysis. Microrheological measurements can be as straightforward as video microscopy recordings of colloidal particle Brownian motion; these simple experiments can yield rich rheological information. Microrheology covers topics ranging from active microrheology using laser or magnetic tweezers to passive microrheology, such as multiple particle tracking and tracer particle microrheology with diffusing wave spectroscopy. Overall, this introduction to microrheology informs those seeking to incorporate these methods into their own research, or simply survey and understand the growing body of microrheology literature. Many sources of archival literature are consolidated into an accessible volume for rheologist and non-specialist alike. The small sample sizes of many microrheology experiments have made it an important method for studying emerging and scarce biological materials, making this characterization method suitable for application in a variety of fields.
A must-have textbook for any undergraduate studying solid state physics.
This successful brief course in solid state physics is now in its second edition. The clear and concise introduction not only describes all the basic phenomena and concepts, but also such advanced issues as magnetism and superconductivity. Each section starts with a gentle introduction, covering basic principles, progressing to a more advanced level in order to present a comprehensive overview of the subject. The book is providing qualitative discussions that help undergraduates understand concepts even if they can?t follow all the mathematical detail.
The revised edition has been carefully updated to present an up-to-date account of the essential topics and recent developments in this exciting field of physics. The coverage now includes ground-breaking materials with high relevance for applications in communication and energy, like graphene and topological insulators, as well as transparent conductors.
The text assumes only basic mathematical knowledge on the part of the reader and includes more than 100 discussion questions and some 70 problems, with solutions free to lecturers from the Wiley-VCH website. The author's webpage provides Online Notes on x-ray scattering, elastic constants, the quantum Hall effect, tight binding model, atomic magnetism, and topological insulators.

This new edition includes the following updates and new features:
* Expanded coverage of mechanical properties of solids, including an improved discussion of the yield stress
* Crystal structure, mechanical properties, and band structure of graphene
* The coverage of electronic properties of metals is expanded by a section on the quantum hall effect including exercises. New topics include the tight-binding model and an expanded discussion on Bloch waves.
* With respect to semiconductors, the discussion of solar cells has been extended and improved.
* Revised coverage of magnetism, with additional material on atomic magnetism
* More extensive treatment of finite solids and nanostructures, now including topological insulators
* Recommendations for further reading have been updated and increased.
* New exercises on Hall mobility, light penetrating metals, band structure

Ultracold atomic gases is a rapidly developing area of physics that attracts many young researchers around the world. Written by world renowned experts in the field, this book gives a comprehensive overview of exciting developments in Bose-Einstein condensation and superfluidity from a theoretical perspective. The authors also make sense of key experiments from the past twenty years with a special focus on the physics of ultracold atomic gases. These systems are characterized by a rich variety of features which make them similar to other important systems of condensed matter physics (like superconductors and superfluids). At the same time they exhibit very peculiar properties which are the result of their gaseous nature, the possibility of trapping in a variety of low dimensional and periodical configurations, and of manipulating the two-body interaction. The book presents a systematic theoretical description based on the most successful many-body approaches applied both to bosons and fermions, at equilibrium and out of equilibrium, at zero as well as at finite temperature. Both theorists and experimentalists will benefit from the book, which is mainly addressed to beginners in the field (master students, PhD students, young postdocs), but also to more experienced researchers who can find in the book novel inspirations and motivations as well as new insightful connections. Building on the authors' first book, Bose-Einstein Condensation (Oxford University Press, 2003), this text offers a more systematic description of Fermi gases, quantum mixtures, low dimensional systems and dipolar gases. It also gives further emphasis on the peculiar phenomenon of superfluidity and its key role in many observable properties of these ultracold quantum gases.
This book is an introduction to the quantum theory of materials and first-principles computational materials modelling. It explains how to use density functional theory as a practical tool for calculating the properties of materials without using any empirical parameters. The structural, mechanical, optical, electrical, and magnetic properties of materials are described within a single unified conceptual framework, rooted in the Schrödinger equation of quantum mechanics, and powered by density functional theory. This book is intended for senior undergraduate and first-year graduate students in materials science, physics, chemistry, and engineering who are approaching for the first time the study of materials at the atomic scale. The inspiring principle of the book is borrowed from one of the slogans of the Perl programming language, 'Easy things should be easy and hard things should be possible'. Following this philosophy, emphasis is placed on the unifying concepts, and on the frequent use of simple heuristic arguments to build on one's own intuition. The presentation style is somewhat cross disciplinary; an attempt is made to seamlessly combine materials science, quantum mechanics, electrodynamics, and numerical analysis, without using a compartmentalized approach. Each chapter is accompanied by an extensive set of references to the original scientific literature and by exercises where all key steps and final results are indicated in order to facilitate learning. This book can be used either as a complement to the quantum theory of materials, or as a primer in modern techniques of computational materials modelling using density functional theory.
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