Similar ebooks

Anthony C. Yu’s translation of The Journey to the West,initially published in 1983, introduced English-speaking audiences to the classic Chinese novel in its entirety for the first time. Written in the sixteenth century, The Journey to the West tells the story of the fourteen-year pilgrimage of the monk Xuanzang, one of China’s most famous religious heroes, and his three supernatural disciples, in search of Buddhist scriptures. Throughout his journey, Xuanzang fights demons who wish to eat him, communes with spirits, and traverses a land riddled with a multitude of obstacles, both real and fantastical. An adventure rich with danger and excitement, this seminal work of the Chinese literary canonis by turns allegory, satire, and fantasy.

With over a hundred chapters written in both prose and poetry, The Journey to the West has always been a complicated and difficult text to render in English while preserving the lyricism of its language and the content of its plot. But Yu has successfully taken on the task, and in this new edition he has made his translations even more accurate and accessible. The explanatory notes are updated and augmented, and Yu has added new material to his introduction, based on his original research as well as on the newest literary criticism and scholarship on Chinese religious traditions. He has also modernized the transliterations included in each volume, using the now-standard Hanyu Pinyin romanization system. Perhaps most important, Yu has made changes to the translation itself in order to make it as precise as possible.

One of the great works of Chinese literature, The Journey to the West is not only invaluable to scholars of Eastern religion and literature, but, in Yu’s elegant rendering, also a delight for any reader.
A new wave of Chinese science fiction is here. This golden age has not only resurrected the genre but also subverted its own conventions. Going beyond political utopianism and technological optimism, contemporary Chinese writers conjure glittering visions and subversive experiments—ranging from space opera to cyberpunk, utopianism to the posthuman, and parodies of China’s rise to deconstructions of the myth of national development.

This anthology showcases the best of contemporary science fiction from Taiwan, Hong Kong, and the People’s Republic of China. In fifteen short stories and novel excerpts, The Reincarnated Giant opens a doorway into imaginary realms alongside our own world and the history of the future. Authors such as Lo Yi-chin, Dung Kai-cheung, Han Song, Chen Qiufan, and the Hugo winner Liu Cixin—some alive during the Cultural Revolution, others born in the 1980s—blur the boundaries between realism and surrealism, between politics and technology. They tell tales of intergalactic war; decoding the last message sent from an extinct human race; the use of dreams as tools to differentiate cyborgs and humans; poets’ strange afterlife inside a supercomputer; cannibalism aboard an airplane; and unchecked development that leads to uncontrollable catastrophe. At a time when the Chinese government promotes the “Chinese dream,” the dark side of the new wave shows a nightmarish unconscious. The Reincarnated Giant is an essential read for anyone interested in the future of the genre.

While on a blind date with a doctor and his mama, Lucy Fong gets a call that her estranged mom is found shot in the stomach in her private investigation office. She returns to Morro Cliff Village to search for answers and her sister...and finds only a dead body in her sister's apartment. 


When the local police chief zeros in on her sister as a "person of interest," Lucy must brush up her sleuthing skills. It's a race to find her sister before the police—and the killer—do. 


She must use all her wits (and those she can borrow) to find this hidden killer before he strikes at her family again.


Don't miss this fast-paced cozy mystery—get your copy of "Just Shoot Me Dead" today!



Keywords: murder mystery series, cat cozy mysteries, American women sleuth, Chinese American, interracial, Chinese culture, fun whodunit, mysteries with kitty cats, detective books with feline sidekicks, female sleuth ebook, humorous crime whodunnit, amateur investigator fast reads, first in series ebook download, cat cozy mystery novel, cat cozy mystery, female sleuth, mysteries with cats, amateur sleuth ebook, small-town detective books, animal mysteries in small towns, humorous crime caper, whimsical women sleuths, kitty mysteries, humor and hijinks novel, mystery ebooks, cozy mysteries, cozy mystery books, cozy mysteries free, cozy mystery, cozy mystery free, cozy mysteries, cat books for free, cat books, cat books, series books free, murder mystery books, murder mystery books, murder mysteries, murder mystery, whodunnit, feel good uplifting stories, first-in-series mystery ebooks

This is an age of deception. Con men ply the roadways. Bogus alchemists pretend to turn one piece of silver into three. Devious nuns entice young women into adultery. Sorcerers use charmed talismans for mind control and murder. A pair of dubious monks extorts money from a powerful official and then spends it on whoring. A rich student tries to bribe the chief examiner, only to hand his money to an imposter. A eunuch kidnaps boys and consumes their "essence" in an attempt to regrow his penis. These are just a few of the entertaining and surprising tales to be found in this seventeenth-century work, said to be the earliest Chinese collection of swindle stories.

The Book of Swindles, compiled by an obscure writer from southern China, presents a fascinating tableau of criminal ingenuity. The flourishing economy of the late Ming period created overnight fortunes for merchants—and gave rise to a host of smooth operators, charlatans, forgers, and imposters seeking to siphon off some of the new wealth. The Book of Swindles, which was ostensibly written as a manual for self-protection in this shifting and unstable world, also offers an expert guide to the art of deception. Each story comes with commentary by the author, Zhang Yingyu, who expounds a moral lesson while also speaking as a connoisseur of the swindle. This volume, which contains annotated translations of just over half of the eighty-odd stories in Zhang's original collection, provides a wealth of detail on social life during the late Ming and offers words of warning for a world in peril.

In this collection of fables, Dr. Yang, Jwing-Ming shares the stories that have influenced him most as a martial artist and lifelong student of the Dao. They bring the Dao to life for readers of all generations. Whoever we are, wherever we’re going, these short tales help us along the path—the Way. Some offer the traveler a moral compass. Some illustrate the dangers in human folly. Others just make us laugh. The Dao in Action will inspire young readers to refine their character. Older readers will smile and recognize moments of truth. This collection is for anyone who would like to explore the enduring lessons of martial wisdom.

Fables entertain us, enlighten us, and guide us. We recognize ourselves in the characters, be they emperors, village girls, or singing frogs. They help us see our own weaknesses, strengths, and possibilities. Their lessons transcend time and culture, touching what it really means to be alive.

For example, in life we must ask questions, learn from others, and find our place in the world. On the other hand, there is real danger in worrying too much about what others think. This lesson is clear—and very humorous—in the story “A Donkey, a Father, and a Son.” We must help others and give of ourselves, but we must also guard against those who would take advantage of us, as in “The Wolf, the Scholar, and the Old Man.” We should save our money and plan for the future, but we must also resist greed, lest we end up “A Rich Man in Jail.”

These lean, concise fables illustrate that balance, the duality of yin and yang, always shifting, always in correction. They help us laugh at our human predicaments—and maybe even at ourselves.
蓝冰是加拿大某电视台的记者,一次偶然的机会发现地产开发商的丈夫有婚外情,这给他俩二十年的幸福婚姻划上了句号,蓝冰也陷入了痛苦之中。这时,蓝冰的好友梅和约翰医生刚从中国回来,他俩是加拿大的眼科医生,也是一家国际慈善组织的志愿医生,每年用自己的假期自费到中国的大西北为那里的穷人做白内障免费摘除手术,在他俩的开导下蓝冰重新振作起来。

她回到了阔别多年的中国,在她高中好友任台长的南州电视台工作。在为一个慈善机构做筹款节目时,蓝冰认识了英俊潇洒、与前夫彼得长得很相像的混血儿朗俊,他从法国回来是南州电视台的文艺编辑,很快地他俩开始了恋情。一次蓝冰开车去孤儿院的途中汽车抛锚,恰巧一位开车路过的中年男子助了她一臂之力,这位男子正是蓝冰高中时的初恋情人杨峰,但是蓝冰并没认出他来。当年他高考多次落榜而蓝冰却考上了北京的一所外语学院,蓝冰提出和他分手后他参军去了老山前线参加了当时的对越作战,但是为了不让蓝冰担心他隐瞒了上老山前线的实情。杨峰从战场上下来后东渡日本,后来和日本太太离婚后回到南州开了一个汽车行,并和香港的叔叔们合作在大陆修筑公路。杨峰对蓝冰仍不忘旧情,忘不了夜来香下他俩的初吻,忘不了他和蓝冰的爱曾成为让他在战场上活下来的精神支柱。但此刻的杨峰,由于一时的怯懦却没有和蓝冰相认。

从此,激情火热的爱情和委婉悠长的暗恋,通过一个又一个惊心动魄的故事,在他们三人之间展现开来。
During the last century China has undergone more change than during any other period in its long and turbulent history. Roughly a quarter of the world’s population has been directly affected by the radical transformation that culminated in the establishment of the present Communist state—one which claims to have translated into reality the Confucian ideal of securing the equality of all men. In underdeveloped regions throughout the world, wherever the quest for social justice has been checked, millions of people have been indirectly affected by these changes. Western scholars, somewhat perplexed by what has already happened, are trying to determine the causes underlying the whole succession of events.

Believing that recent developments are best understood when viewed from a historical perspective, the editor of this work has tried to present in one volume a conspectus of the brilliant and many-sided development of Chinese philosophy.

The study of Chinese philosophy has been severely restricted by the difficulties of the classical literary style and, until recently, by the absence of reliable translations. Problems of terminology abound because the same Chinese term is translated differently in the works of different philosophers. The editor endeavors in the introductory statement preceding each selection to help the reader to cope with these lexical problems. By adopting a chronological arrangement of the materials and calling attention to interlinking developments, he provides the reader with a practical means of familiarizing himself with the most important documents of the cultural heritage of China, the cradle of the world’s oldest civilization, from the Confucian Analects to the theoretical statements of Mao Tse-Tung.
From the acclaimed author of Brothers and To Live: thirteen audacious stories that resonate with the beauty, grittiness, and exquisite irony of everyday life in China.
 
Yu Hua’s narrative gifts, populist voice, and inimitable wit have made him one of the most celebrated and best-selling writers in China. These flawlessly crafted stories—unflinching in their honesty, yet balanced with humor and compassion—take us into the small towns and dirt roads that are home to the people who make China run.
 
In the title story, a shopkeeper confronts a child thief and punishes him without mercy. “Victory” shows a young couple shaken by the husband’s infidelity, scrambling to stake claims to the components of their shared life. “Sweltering Summer” centers on an awkward young man who shrewdly uses the perks of his government position to court two women at once. Other tales show, by turns, two poor factory workers who spoil their only son, a gang of peasants who bully the village orphan, and a spectacular fistfight outside a refinery bathhouse. With sharp language and a keen eye, Yu Hua explores the line between cruelty and warmth on which modern China is—precariously, joyfully—balanced. Taken together, these stories form a timely snapshot of a nation lit with the deep feeling and ready humor that characterize its people. Already a sensation in Asia, certain to win recognition around the world, Yu Hua, in Boy in the Twilight, showcases the peerless gifts of a writer at the top of his form.
This book consists of 15 short stories written in Simplified Chinese and pinyin. The purpose of this book is to provide readers with reading materials to practice their reading skills as well as an introduction to more extended sentence structure and longer articles.


This book has all the vocabularies in HSK 1. If you finish the book, you would have practiced your reading skill on all the vocabularies in HSK 1.


I have tried to restrict the vocabularies used in this book to HSK 1 as far as possible. Where it is not possible, I have introduced limited new words in the story. If you have learned all the HSK 1 Vocabulary and completed the Standard Course Book for HSK 1 by Jiang Liping, you would be able to read about 90% of this book without learning new words.


I consider the HSK 1 Vocabulary together with the new words introduced in Standard Course Book as Extended HSK 1 Vocabulary and I will refer to it as such from now on.


The structure of this book is as follows:

·     Story – this section is the story in Simplified Chinese without pinyin and the English translation. To test level of reading skills, you should attempt to read this section first before going to the next.

·     Statistics – this will provide the reader with an analysis of the words used in the story and the level of difficulty. It will set out new words along with pinyin and explanation. The new words set out here are not cumulative. New words are set out here as long as the words used are not in the Extended HSK 1 Vocabulary.

·     Pinyin and Translation – this will be the section for Pinyin and English translation.

·     Appendix – for the benefit of those who need assistance on the HSK 1 and Extended HSK 1 vocabularies, I have included them in this section for your reference.


The stories in this book are individual stories. A reader may choose to read this book in any particular order. To help you decide which story to read first, you may take a look at the statistics before you begin. The difficulty level for each story varies.


For the e-book version, I have also enabled text to speech function for this book. At the time of writing, Kindle text to speech does not support Chinese characters, however you may install free software available for your browser or mobile phone or tablet or Google text to speech on your android gadget. It will enable the book to read out loud, and you can listen to the pronunciation of the words.


Lastly, I am sorry to disappoint those who enjoy reading a book with pictures because this book has no picture, only words. For the rest who doesn’t like the distraction of pictures, I hope you will enjoy reading this book. If you have any feedback, please feel free to visit https://allmusing.net.


Happy reading!

B.Y Leong

Heroes of China s Great Leap Forward presents contrasting narratives of the most ambitious and disastrous mass movement in modern Chinese history. The objective of the Great Leap, when it was launched in the late 1950s, was to catapult China into the ranks of the great military and industrial powers with no assistance from the outside world; it resulted in a famine that killed tens of millions of the nation s peasants.

Li Zhun s A Brief Biography of Li Shuangshuang, written while the movement was underway, celebrates the Great Leap as it was supposed to be: a time of optimism, dynamism, and shared purpose. A spirited young peasant woman, freed from the restrictions of home life, launches a canteen and wins the recognition of authorities and the admiration of her husband. The story and the film that followed it made Li Shuangshuang the greatest fictional heroine of the Great Leap. In contrast, Zhang Yigong s short novel The Story of the Criminal Li Tongzhong, written two decades later, was one of the first works published in China to suggest a much darker side to the Great Leap. A village official leads a raid on a state granary to feed starving peasants; he is later arrested and dies a criminal. Although Zhang stopped short of portraying the horrors of famine, his tone of moral outrage provides a rejoinder to the triumphalism of Li Shuangshuang.

The stories are accompanied by an introduction to the Great Leap and portraits of the two writers, including their recollections of that traumatic time and the creation of their very different heroes.

"
In The Columbia Anthology of Chinese Folk and Popular Literature, two of the world's leading sinologists, Victor H. Mair and Mark Bender, capture the breadth of China's oral-based literary heritage. This collection presents works drawn from the large body of oral literature of many of China's recognized ethnic groups including the Han, Yi, Miao, Tu, Daur, Tibetan, Uyghur, and Kazak and the selections include a variety of genres. Chapters cover folk stories, songs, rituals, and drama, as well as epic traditions and professional storytelling, and feature both familiar and little-known texts, from the story of the woman warrior Hua Mulan to the love stories of urban storytellers in the Yangtze delta, the shaman rituals of the Manchu, and a trickster tale of the Daur people from the forests of the northeast. The Cannibal Grandmother of the Yi and other strange creatures and characters unsettle accepted notions of Chinese fable and literary form. Readers are introduced to antiphonal songs of the Zhuang and the Dong, who live among the fantastic limestone hills of the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region; work and matchmaking songs of the mountain-dwelling She of Fujian province; and saltwater songs of the Cantonese-speaking boat people of Hong Kong. The editors feature the Mongolian epic poems of Geser Khan and Jangar; the sad tale of the Qeo family girl, from the Tu people of Gansu and Qinghai provinces; and local plays known as "rice sprouts" from Hebei province. These fascinating juxtapositions invite comparisons among cultures, styles, and genres, and expert translations preserve the individual character of each thrillingly imaginative work.
©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.