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The celebrated ‘Meditations’ of Marcus Aurelius have endured as a potent expression of Stoic belief and remain an intriguing insight into the mind of one of Rome’s greatest emperors. The Ancient Classics series provides eReaders with the wisdom of the Classical world, with both English translations and the original Latin and Greek texts.  This comprehensive eBook presents the complete extant works of Marcus Aurelius, with beautiful illustrations, informative introductions and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 1)

* Beautifully illustrated with images relating to Marcus’ life and works
* Features the complete extant works of Marcus, in both English translation and the original Greek
* Includes section numbers – ideal for classical students
* Concise introduction to the ‘Meditations’
* Features Haines’ seminal translation from the Loeb Classical Library edition
* Excellent formatting of the texts
* Easily locate the sections or works you want to read with individual contents tables
* Includes Marcus’ rare speeches and sayings, first time in digital print
* Provides a special dual English and Greek text, allowing readers to compare the sections paragraph by paragraph – ideal for students
* Features two bonus biographies – discover Marcus’ ancient world
* Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres

Please note: some Kindle software programs cannot display Greek characters correctly; however the characters do display correctly on Kindle devices.

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CONTENTS:

The Translations
MEDITATIONS
THE SPEECHES OF MARCUS
THE SAYINGS OF MARCUS

The Greek Text
CONTENTS OF THE GREEK TEXT

The Dual Texts
DUAL GREEK AND ENGLISH TEXT

The Biographies
INTRODUCTION TO MARCUS AURELIUS by W. H. D. Rouse
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF MARCUS AURELIUS ANTONINUS by George Long

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In the first authoritative biography of Alexander the Great written for a general audience in a generation, classicist and historian Philip Freeman tells the remarkable life of the great conqueror.

The celebrated Macedonian king has been one of the most enduring figures in history. He was a general of such skill and renown that for two thousand years other great leaders studied his strategy and tactics, from Hannibal to Napoleon, with countless more in between. He flashed across the sky of history like a comet, glowing brightly and burning out quickly: crowned at age nineteen, dead by thirty-two. He established the greatest empire of the ancient world; Greek coins and statues are found as far east as Afghanistan. Our interest in him has never faded.

Alexander was born into the royal family of Macedonia, the kingdom that would soon rule over Greece. Tutored as a boy by Aristotle, Alexander had an inquisitive mind that would serve him well when he faced formidable obstacles during his military campaigns. Shortly after taking command of the army, he launched an invasion of the Persian empire, and continued his conquests as far south as the deserts of Egypt and as far east as the mountains of present-day Pakistan and the plains of India. Alexander spent nearly all his adult life away from his homeland, and he and his men helped spread the Greek language throughout western Asia, where it would become the lingua franca of the ancient world. Within a short time after Alexander’s death in Baghdad, his empire began to fracture. Best known among his successors are the Ptolemies of Egypt, whose empire lasted until Cleopatra.

In his lively and authoritative biography of Alexander, classical scholar and historian Philip Freeman describes Alexander’s astonishing achievements and provides insight into the mercurial character of the great conqueror. Alexander could be petty and magnanimous, cruel and merciful, impulsive and farsighted. Above all, he was ferociously, intensely competitive and could not tolerate losing—which he rarely did. As Freeman explains, without Alexander, the influence of Greece on the ancient world would surely not have been as great as it was, even if his motivation was not to spread Greek culture for beneficial purposes but instead to unify his empire. Only a handful of people have influenced history as Alexander did, which is why he continues to fascinate us.
Thucydides called his account of two decades of war between Athens and Sparta “a possssion for all time,” and indeed it is the first and still most famous work in the Western historical tradition. Considered essential reading for generals, statesmen, and liberally educated citizens for more than 2,000 years, The Peloponnesian War is a mine of military, moral, political, and philosophical wisdom.

Thucydides called his account of two decades of war between Athens and Sparta “a possssion for all time,” and indeed it is the first and still most famous work in the Western historical tradition. Considered essential reading for generals, statesmen, and liberally educated citizens for more than 2,000 years, The Peloponnesian War is a mine of military, moral, political, and philosophical wisdom.

However, this classic book has long presented obstacles to the uninitiated reader. Robert Strassler's new edition removes these obstacles by providing a new coherence to the narrative overall, and by effectively reconstructing the lost cultural context that Thucydides shared with his original audience. Based on the venerable Richard Crawley translation, updated and revised for modern readers. The Landmark Thucydides includes a vast array of superbly designed and presented maps, brief informative appendices by outstanding classical scholars on subjects of special relevance to the text, explanatory marginal notes on each page, an index of unprecedented subtlety, and numerous other useful features.

In any list of the Great Books of Western Civilization, The Peloponnesian War stands near the top. This authoritative new edition will ensure that its greatness is appreciated by future generations.
 The ‘Septuagint’ is the primary Greek translation of the Old Testament, which according to tradition was commissioned by Ptolemy II for inclusion in the Library of Alexandria. Legend tells there were seventy-two translators, six from each of the twelve tribes of Israel, who worked independently to translate the original Hebrew text. The ‘Septuagint’ is a cornerstone of Western theology and remains an immensely popular choice of study for Christian scholars across the world. Delphi’s Ancient Classics series provides eReaders with the wisdom of the Classical world, with both English translations and the original Greek texts.  This comprehensive eBook presents the complete Septuagint, with special Dual Text feature, an informative introduction and illustrations. (Version 1)


* Beautifully illustrated with images relating to the Septuagint

* Features the complete Septuagint, in both English translation (Sir Lancelot C. L. Brenton, 1851) and the original Greek (Rahlfs’ edition)

* Excellent formatting of the texts

* Easily locate the chapters or books you want to read with detailed contents tables

* Provides a special dual English and Greek text, allowing you to compare the texts verse by verse – ideal for Bible studies

* Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres


Please note: some Kindle software programs cannot display Greek characters correctly; however the characters do display correctly on Kindle devices.


Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to explore our range of Ancient Classics titles or buy the entire series as a Super Set


CONTENTS:


The Translation

SEPTUAGINT

DETAILED TABLE OF CONTENTS


The Greek Text

CONTENTS OF GREEK TEXT

DETAILED CONTENTS OF GREEK TEXT


The Dual Text

DUAL GREEK AND ENGLISH TEXT

DETAILED CONTENTS OF DUAL TEXT


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Byzantium. The name evokes grandeur and exoticism--gold, cunning, and complexity. In this unique book, Judith Herrin unveils the riches of a quite different civilization. Avoiding a standard chronological account of the Byzantine Empire's millennium--long history, she identifies the fundamental questions about Byzantium--what it was, and what special significance it holds for us today.

Bringing the latest scholarship to a general audience in accessible prose, Herrin focuses each short chapter around a representative theme, event, monument, or historical figure, and examines it within the full sweep of Byzantine history--from the foundation of Constantinople, the magnificent capital city built by Constantine the Great, to its capture by the Ottoman Turks.


She argues that Byzantium's crucial role as the eastern defender of Christendom against Muslim expansion during the early Middle Ages made Europe--and the modern Western world--possible. Herrin captivates us with her discussions of all facets of Byzantine culture and society. She walks us through the complex ceremonies of the imperial court. She describes the transcendent beauty and power of the church of Hagia Sophia, as well as chariot races, monastic spirituality, diplomacy, and literature. She reveals the fascinating worlds of military usurpers and ascetics, eunuchs and courtesans, and artisans who fashioned the silks, icons, ivories, and mosaics so readily associated with Byzantine art.


An innovative history written by one of our foremost scholars, Byzantium reveals this great civilization's rise to military and cultural supremacy, its spectacular destruction by the Fourth Crusade, and its revival and final conquest in 1453.

Alexander the Great, arguably the most exciting figure from antiquity, waged war as a Homeric hero and lived as one, conquering native peoples and territories on a superhuman scale. From the time he invaded Asia in 334 to his death in 323, he expanded the Macedonian empire from Greece in the west to Asia Minor, the Levant, Egypt, Central Asia and "India" (Pakistan and Kashmir) in the east. Although many other kings and generals forged empires, Alexander produced one that was without parallel, even if it was short-lived. And yet, Alexander could not have achieved what he did without the accomplishments of his father, Philip II (r. 359-336). It was Philip who truly changed the course of Macedonian history, transforming a weak, disunited, and economically backward kingdom into a military powerhouse. A warrior king par excellence, Philip left Alexander with the greatest army in the Greek world, a centralized monarchy, economic prosperity, and a plan to invade Asia. For the first time, By the Spear offers an exhilarating military narrative of the reigns of these two larger-than-life figures in one volume. Ian Worthington gives full breadth to the careers of father and son, showing how Philip was the architect of the Macedonian empire, which reached its zenith under Alexander, only to disintegrate upon his death. By the Spear also explores the impact of Greek culture in the East, as Macedonian armies became avatars of social and cultural change in lands far removed from the traditional sphere of Greek influence. In addition, the book discusses the problems Alexander faced in dealing with a diverse subject population and the strategies he took to what might be called nation building, all of which shed light on contemporary events in culturally dissimilar regions of the world. The result is a gripping and unparalleled account of the role these kings played in creating a vast empire and the enduring legacy they left behind.
Built in the fifth century b.c., the Parthenon has been venerated for more than two millennia as the West’s ultimate paragon of beauty and proportion. Since the Enlightenment, it has also come to represent our political ideals, the lavish temple to the goddess Athena serving as the model for our most hallowed civic architecture. But how much do the values of those who built the Parthenon truly correspond with our own? And apart from the significance with which we have invested it, what exactly did this marvel of human hands mean to those who made it?

In this revolutionary book, Joan Breton Connelly challenges our most basic assumptions about the Parthenon and the ancient Athenians. Beginning with the natural environment and its rich mythic associations, she re-creates the development of the Acropolis—the Sacred Rock at the heart of the city-state—from its prehistoric origins to its Periklean glory days as a constellation of temples among which the Parthenon stood supreme. In particular, she probes the Parthenon’s legendary frieze: the 525-foot-long relief sculpture that originally encircled the upper reaches before it was partially destroyed by Venetian cannon fire (in the seventeenth century) and most of what remained was shipped off to Britain (in the nineteenth century) among the Elgin marbles. The frieze’s vast enigmatic procession—a dazzling pageant of cavalrymen and elders, musicians and maidens—has for more than two hundred years been thought to represent a scene of annual civic celebration in the birthplace of democracy. But thanks to a once-lost play by Euripides (the discovery of which, in the wrappings of a Hellenistic Egyptian mummy, is only one of this book’s intriguing adventures), Connelly has uncovered a long-buried meaning, a story of human sacrifice set during the city’s mythic founding. In a society startlingly preoccupied with cult ritual, this story was at the core of what it meant to be Athenian. Connelly reveals a world that beggars our popular notions of Athens as a city of staid philosophers, rationalists, and rhetoricians, a world in which our modern secular conception of democracy would have been simply incomprehensible.

The Parthenon’s full significance has been obscured until now owing in no small part, Connelly argues, to the frieze’s dismemberment. And so her investigation concludes with a call to reunite the pieces, in order that what is perhaps the greatest single work of art surviving from antiquity may be viewed more nearly as its makers intended. Marshalling a breathtaking range of textual and visual evidence, full of fresh insights woven into a thrilling narrative that brings the distant past to life, The Parthenon Enigma is sure to become a landmark in our understanding of the civilization from which we claim cultural descent.
e-artnow presents to you this meticulously edited and formatted collection of the greatest world classics: Les Misérables (Victor Hugo) The Call of the Wild (Jack London) Walden (Henry David Thoreau) Anna Karenina (Leo Tolstoy) War and Peace (Leo Tolstoy) Crime and Punishment (Fyodor Dostoevsky) Art of War (Sun Tzu) Dead Souls (Nikolai Gogol) Don Quixote (Miguel de Cervantes) Dona Perfecta (Benito Pérez Galdós) A Doll's House (Henrik Ibsen) Gitanjali (Rabindranath Tagore) The Life of Lazarillo de Tormes (Anonymous) Life is a Dream (Pedro Calderon de la Barca) The Divine Comedy (Dante) Decameron (Giovanni Boccaccio) The Prince (Machiavelli) Arabian Nights Hamlet (Shakespeare) Romeo and Juliet (Shakespeare) Robinson Crusoe (Daniel Defoe) Pride & Prejudice (Jane Austen) Frankenstein (Mary Shelley) Jane Eyre (Charlotte Brontë) Wuthering Heights (Emily Brontë) Great Expectations (Charles Dickens) Ulysses (James Joyce) Pygmalion (George Bernard Shaw) Ivanhoe (Sir Walter Scott) Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (Robert Louis Stevenson) Peter and Wendy (J. M. Barrie) The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Mark Twain) Moby-Dick (Herman Melville) Little Women (Louisa May Alcott) Leaves of Grass (Walt Whitman) The Raven (Edgar Allan Poe) Anne of Green Gables (L. M. Montgomery) Iliad & Odyssey (Homer) The Republic (Plato) Faust, a Tragedy (Johann Wolfgang von Goethe) Siddhartha (Herman Hesse) Thus Spoke Zarathustra (Friedrich Nietzsche) 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (Jules Verne) Journey to the Centre of the Earth (Jules Verne) The Hunchback of Notre Dame (Victor Hugo) The Flowers of Evil (Charles Baudelaire) The Count of Monte Cristo (Alexandre Dumas) The Poison Tree (Bankim Chandra Chatterjee) Shakuntala (Kalidasa) Rámáyan of Válmíki (Válmíki) Tao Te Ching (Laozi) The Analects of Confucius (Confucius) Hung Lou Meng or, The Dream of the Red Chamber (Cao Xueqin) Two Years in the Forbidden City (Princess Der Ling) Bushido, the Soul of Japan (Inazo Nitobé) The Book of Tea (Kakuzo Okakura) Botchan (Soseki Natsume)…
Alexander the Great, perhaps the most commanding leader in history, united his empire and his army by the titanic force of his will. His death at the age of thirty-two spelled the end of that unity.

The story of Alexander’s conquest of the Persian empire is known to many readers, but the dramatic and consequential saga of the empire’s collapse remains virtually untold. It is a tale of loss that begins with the greatest loss of all, the death of the Macedonian king who had held the empire together.

With his demise, it was as if the sun had disappeared from the solar system, as if planets and moons began to spin crazily in new directions, crashing into one another with unimaginable force.

Alexander bequeathed his power, legend has it, “to the strongest,” leaving behind a mentally damaged half brother and a posthumously born son as his only heirs. In a strange compromise, both figures—Philip III and Alexander IV—were elevated to the kingship, quickly becoming prizes, pawns, fought over by a half-dozen Macedonian generals. Each successor could confer legitimacy on whichever general controlled him.

At the book’s center is the monarch’s most vigorous defender; Alexander’s former Greek secretary, now transformed into a general himself. He was a man both fascinating and entertaining, a man full of tricks and connivances, like the enthroned ghost of Alexander that gives the book its title, and becomes the determining factor in the precarious fortunes of the royal family.

James Romm, brilliant classicist and storyteller, tells the galvanizing saga of the men who followed Alexander and found themselves incapable of preserving his empire. The result was the undoing of a world, formerly united in a single empire, now ripped apart into a nightmare of warring nation-states struggling for domination, the template of our own times.
An authoritative account from an expert author: The Spartacus War is the first popular history of the revolt in English.

The Spartacus War is the extraordinary story of the most famous slave rebellion in the ancient world, the fascinating true story behind a legend that has been the inspiration for novelists, filmmakers, and revolutionaries for 2,000 years. Starting with only seventy-four men, a gladiator named Spartacus incited a rebellion that threatened Rome itself. With his fellow gladiators, Spartacus built an army of 60,000 soldiers and controlled the southern Italian countryside. A charismatic leader, he used religion to win support. An ex-soldier in the Roman army, Spartacus excelled in combat. He defeated nine Roman armies and kept Rome at bay for two years before he was defeated. After his final battle, 6,000 of his followers were captured and crucified along Rome's main southern highway.

The Spartacus War is the dramatic and factual account of one of history's great rebellions. Spartacus was beaten by a Roman general, Crassus, who had learned how to defeat an insurgency. But the rebels were partly to blame for their failure. Their army was large and often undisciplined; the many ethnic groups within it frequently quarreled over leadership. No single leader, not even Spartacus, could keep them all in line. And when faced with a choice between escaping to freedom and looting, the rebels chose wealth over liberty, risking an eventual confrontation with Rome's most powerful forces.

The result of years of research, The Spartacus War is based not only on written documents but also on archaeological evidence, historical reconstruction, and the author's extensive travels in the Italian countryside that Spartacus once conquered.
Greek mythology explored like never before


Fans of George R.R Martin’s A Song of Ice & Fire series and the Game of Thrones TV series will love Greek Mythology Explained, a unique retelling of Greek mythological tales featuring love, betrayal, murder and ruthless ambitions. 


A fascinating take on classical Greek stories: Discover six classic Greek myths in this exciting retelling that paints both famous and lesser well known characters in a whole new light. Follow the likes of Odysseus, Lamia, Bellerophon, Icarus, Medusa and Artemis as their fates are revealed through bloody trials, gut-wrenching betrayals, sinister motives and broken hearts. With an accessible writing style that delves into the thoughts, feelings, desires, and motivations of every character, these mythical figures and their compelling stories will resonate with readers as they are guided through perilous and tragic adventures.


A deeper understanding: Greek Mythology Explained provides an in-depth analysis of each story told as it unravels the greater themes and valuable lessons hidden within each chapter. Readers will gain a deeper insight into the character’s motives and the varying depictions of the original Greek myths.


Readers will:

• Sail with Odysseus as he navigates through the straits of Messina with a terrifying monster on each side, intent only on killing him and his crew.
• Witness Lamia’s world turned upside down as she loses her kingdom, her children and her humanity.
• Journey with Bellerophon as he battles the Chimera and becomes the hero that he was destined to be.
• Take flight with Icarus and Daedalus as they escape their confinement and the Cretan navy.
• Follow Medusa as she loses faith in the gods and becomes the monster she so adamantly wished to protect her people from.
• Experience the love between Artemis and Orion, as well as the bitter jealousy it spawns at the core of her brother Apollo.

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