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This carefully crafted ebook: "The Complete Novels of Sir Walter Scott: Waverly, Rob Roy, Ivanhoe, The Pirate, Old Mortality, The Guy Mannering, The Antiquary, The Heart of Midlothian and many more (Illustrated)" is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. Table of Contents: Introduction: SIR WALTER SCOTT AND LADY MORGAN by Victor Hugo MEMORIES AND PORTRAITS by Robert Louis Stevenson SCOTT AND HIS PUBLISHERS by Charles Dickens WAVERLY NOVELS: WAVERLEY GUY MANNERING THE ANTIQUARY ROB ROY IVANHOE KENILWORTH THE PIRATE THE FORTUNES OF NIGEL PEVERIL OF THE PEAK QUENTIN DURWARD ST. RONAN'S WELL REDGAUNTLET WOODSTOCK THE FAIR MAID OF PERTH ANNE OF GEIERSTEIN Tales of My Landlord OLD MORTALITY BLACK DWARF THE HEART OF MIDLOTHIAN THE BRIDE OF LAMMERMOOR A LEGEND OF MONTROSE COUNT ROBERT OF PARIS CASTLE DANGEROUS Tales from Benedictine Sources THE MONASTERY THE ABBOT Tales of the Crusaders THE BETROTHED THE TALISMAN Biographies: SIR WALTER SCOTT by George Saintsbury SIR WALTER SCOTT by Richard H. Hutton MEMOIRS OF THE LIFE OF SIR WALTER SCOTT by J. G. Lockhart Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832) was a Scottish historical novelist, playwright and poet. He was the first modern English-language author to have a truly international career in his lifetime, with many contemporary readers in Europe, Australia, and North America. His novels and poetry are still read, and many of his works remain classics of both English-language literature and of Scottish literature. Famous titles include Ivanhoe, Rob Roy, The Lady of the Lake, Waverley, The Heart of Midlothian and The Bride of Lammermoor.
INTRODUCTION TO THE PIRATE.

“Quoth he, there was a ship.”

This brief preface may begin like the tale of the Ancient Mariner, since it was on shipboard that the author acquired the very moderate degree of local knowledge and information, both of people and scenery, which he has endeavoured to embody in the romance of the Pirate.

In the summer and autumn of 1814, the author was invited to join a party of Commissioners for the Northern Light-House Service, who proposed making a voyage round the coast of Scotland, and through its various groups of islands, chiefly for the purpose of seeing the condition of the many lighthouses under their direction,—edifices so important, whether regarding them as benevolent or political institutions. Among the commissioners who manage this important public concern, the sheriff of each county of Scotland which borders on the sea, holds ex-officio a place at the Board. These gentlemen act in every respect gratuitously, but have the use of an armed yacht, well found and fitted up, when they choose to visit the lighthouses. An excellent engineer, Mr. Robert Stevenson, is attached to the Board, to afford the benefit of his professional advice. The author accompanied this expedition as a guest; for Selkirkshire, though it calls him Sheriff, has not, like the kingdom of Bohemia in Corporal Trim’s story, a seaport in its circuit, nor its magistrate, of course, any place at the Board of Commissioners,—a circumstance of little consequence where all were old and intimate friends, bred to the same profession, and disposed to accommodate each other in every possible manner.

This carefully crafted ebook: "The Waverly Novels: 26 Books in One Volume - Complete Collection" is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. Table of Contents: INTRODUCTION: Famous Authors on Scott SIR WALTER SCOTT AND LADY MORGAN by Victor Hugo MEMORIES AND PORTRAITS by Robert Louis Stevenson SCOTT AND HIS PUBLISHERS by Charles Dickens WAVERLY NOVELS: WAVERLEY GUY MANNERING THE ANTIQUARY ROB ROY IVANHOE KENILWORTH THE PIRATE THE FORTUNES OF NIGEL PEVERIL OF THE PEAK QUENTIN DURWARD ST. RONAN'S WELL REDGAUNTLET WOODSTOCK THE FAIR MAID OF PERTH ANNE OF GEIERSTEIN Tales of My Landlord OLD MORTALITY BLACK DWARF THE HEART OF MIDLOTHIAN THE BRIDE OF LAMMERMOOR A LEGEND OF MONTROSE COUNT ROBERT OF PARIS CASTLE DANGEROUS Tales from Benedictine Sources THE MONASTERY THE ABBOT Tales of the Crusaders THE BETROTHED THE TALISMAN Biographies: SIR WALTER SCOTT by George Saintsbury SIR WALTER SCOTT by Richard H. Hutton MEMOIRS OF THE LIFE OF SIR WALTER SCOTT by J. G. Lockhart Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832) was a Scottish historical novelist, playwright and poet. He was the first modern English-language author to have a truly international career in his lifetime, with many contemporary readers in Europe, Australia, and North America. His novels and poetry are still read, and many of his works remain classics of both English-language literature and of Scottish literature. Famous titles include Ivanhoe, Rob Roy, The Lady of the Lake, Waverley, The Heart of Midlothian and The Bride of Lammermoor.
 Principal Subjects.

1. Title and Character of the Book,
The Divine Salutation
The Glorious Vision of Christ,
The Seven Churches,
Threefold Division of the Book,

2. Addresses to the Seven Churches,
Ephesus, Smyrna, Pergamos, Thyatira, Sardis, Philadelphia, Laodicea.
Satan’s Throne and Dwelling
Balaamism and Nicolaitanism,

3. Rewards to the Overcomer.
The Seven Spirits and the Seven Stars,
The Coming Hour of Trial,
Christ Stands, Knocks, and Speaks,

Third Division of the Apocalypse,

4. The Throne of the Eternal,
Royal Authority of the Redeemed,
The Living Creatures and their Worship,

5. The Throne and the Slain Lamb,
The Seven-Sealed Book,
The Intelligent Universe in Praise to God,

6. Opening of the First Six Seals,
First — Sixth, (Seventh.)

7. Parenthetic Visions of Grace,
Three Companies of Millennial Saints,
Great Tribulation,

8. The First Four Trumpets,
First — Fourth, (Fifth, Sixth.)

9. The Fifth and Sixth Trumpets,
The Fallen Star or Personal Antichrist,
The Number of the Avenging Hosts,

10. Descent of the Strong Angel — The Little Opened Book,
Solemn Oath of the Angel,
Recommencement of John’s Prophetic Ministry,

11. Jewish Testimony and the Seventh Trumpet,
Jerusalem Trodden Down
The World Kingdom of our Lord,

12. Events as God Views Them,
The Woman and the Man-Child,
Satan — His Names and Work,

13. The Two Beasts,
Revival of the Roman Empire,
The Number of the Beast, 666,

14. Sevenfold Intervention in Grace and Judgment,
(1) Jewish Remnant Spared, (2) The Everlasting Gospel, (3) Fall of Babylon, (4) Worshippers of the Beast, (5) The Blessed Dead, (6) Harvest of the Earth, (7) The Vine of the Earth.

15. The Seven Vials, or Bowls of Wrath,
The Victorious Martyred Company of Judah,
Ministers of God’s Wrath equipped for Judgment,

16. The Seven Vials, etc. (Continued),
First — Seventh.

17. Babylon and the Beast,
The Great Harlot Described,

18. The Fall of Babylon.
Lamentation on Earth,
Triumph in Heaven,

19. The Marriage of the Lamb,
The Judgment of the Rebellious Nations,
The Conqueror and His Victorious Army,

20. The Millennium, and the Judgment of the Dead,
The Reign with Christ,
The Last Human Confederacy,
Satan Cast into the Lake of Fire,

21. The Eternal State, and the Bride in Governmental and Millennial Splendour,
A New Heaven and a New Earth,
The City and its Glories,

22. Concluding Vision and Testimonies,
The River and Tree of Life,
“Surely I come quickly,”


VOLUME ONE


I knew Anselmo. He was shrewd and prudent,

Wisdom and cunning had their shares of him;

But he was shrewish as a wayward child,

And pleased again by toys which childhood please;

As—-book of fables, graced with print of wood,

Or else the jingling of a rusty medal,

Or the rare melody of some old ditty,

That first was sung to please King Pepin's cradle
INTRODUCTION

The present work completes a series of fictitious narratives, intended to illustrate the manners of Scotland at three different periods. Waverleyembraced the age of our fathers, Guy Mannering that of our own youth, and the Antiquary refers to the last ten years of the eighteenth century. I have, in the two last narratives especially, sought my principal personages in the class of society who are the last to feel the influence of that general polish which assimilates to each other the manners of different nations. Among the same class I have placed some of the scenes in which I have endeavoured to illustrate the operation of the higher and more violent passions; both because the lower orders are less restrained by the habit of suppressing their feelings, and because I agree, with my friend Wordsworth, that they seldom fail to express them in the strongest and most powerful language. This is, I think, peculiarly the case with the peasantry of my own country, a class with whom I have long been familiar. The antique force and simplicity of their language, often tinctured with the Oriental eloquence of Scripture, in the mouths of those of an elevated understanding, give pathos to their grief, and dignity to their resentment.

I have been more solicitous to describe manners minutely than to arrange in any case an artificial and combined narrative, and have but to regret that I felt myself unable to unite these two requisites of a good Novel.

The knavery of the adept in the following sheets may appear forced and improbable; but we have had very late instances of the force of superstitious credulity to a much greater extent, and the reader may be assured, that this part of the narrative is founded on a fact of actual occurrence.

VOLUME I


'Tis said that words and signs have power

O'er sprites in planetary hour;

But scarce I praise their venturous part

Who tamper with such dangerous art.

Lay of the Last Minstrel.
INTRODUCTION

The Novel or Romance of Waverley made its way to the public slowly, of course, at first, but afterwards with such accumulating popularity as to encourage the Author to a second attempt. He looked about for a name and a subject; and the manner in which the novels were composed cannot be better illustrated than by reciting the simple narrative on which Guy Mannering was originally founded; but to which, in the progress of the work, the production ceased to bear any, even the most distant resemblance. The tale was originally told me by an old servant of my father's, an excellent old Highlander, without a fault, unless a preference to mountain dew over less potent liquors be accounted one. He believed as firmly in the story as in any part of his creed.

A grave and elderly person, according to old John MacKinlay's account, while travelling in the wilder parts of Galloway, was benighted. With difficulty he found his way to a country seat, where, with the hospitality of the time and country, he was readily admitted. The owner of the house, a gentleman of good fortune, was much struck by the reverend appearance of his guest, and apologised to him for a certain degree of confusion which must unavoidably attend his reception, and could not escape his eye. The lady of the house was, he said, confined to her apartment, and on the point of making her husband a father for the first time, though they had been ten years married. At such an emergency, the laird said, he feared his guest might meet with some apparent neglect.

INTRODUCTION TO THE BRIDE OF LAMMERMOOR

THE Author, on a former occasion, declined giving the real source from which he drew the tragic subject of this history, because, though occurring at a distant period, it might possibly be unpleasing to the feelings of the descendants of the parties. But as he finds an account of the circumstances given in the Notes to Law's Memorials, by his ingenious friend, Charles Kirkpatrick Sharpe, Esq., and also indicated in his reprint of the Rev. Mr. Symson's poems appended to the Large Description of Galloway, as the original of the Bride of Lammermoor, the Author feels himself now at liberty to tell the tale as he had it from connexions of his own, who lived very near the period, and were closely related to the family of the bride.

It is well known that the family of Dalrymple, which has produced, within the space of two centuries, as many men of talent, civil and military, and of literary, political, and professional eminence, as any house in Scotland, first rose into distinction in the person of James Dalrymple, one of the most eminent lawyers that ever lived, though the labours of his powerful mind were unhappily exercised on a subject so limited as Scottish jurisprudence, on which he has composed an admirable work.

He married Margaret, daughter to Ross of Balneel, with whom he obtained a considerable estate. She was an able, politic, and high-minded woman, so successful in what she undertook, that the vulgar, no way partial to her husband or her family, imputed her success to necromancy. According to the popular belief, this Dame Margaret purchased the temporal prosperity of her family from the Master whom she served under a singular condition, which is thus narrated by the historian of her grandson, the great Earl of Stair: "She lived to a great age, and at her death desired that she might not be put under ground, but that her coffin should stand upright on one end of it, promising that while she remained in that situation the Dalrymples should continue to flourish. What was the old lady's motive for the request, or whether she really made such a promise, I shall not take upon me to determine; but it's certain her coffin stands upright in the isle of the church of Kirklistown, the burial-place belonging to the family." The talents of this accomplished race were sufficient to have accounted for the dignities which many members of the family attained, without any supernatural assistance. But their extraordinary prosperity was attended by some equally singular family misfortunes, of which that which befell their eldest daughter was at once unaccountable and melancholy.

This carefully crafted ebook: "Tales of the Crusaders: The Betrothed & The Talisman (Illustrated)" is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. The Betrothed is the first of two Tales of the Crusaders. The action takes place in the Welsh Marches during the latter part of the reign of Henry II, after 1187. Eveline, the 16-year-old daughter of Sir Raymond Berenger, is rescued from a Welsh siege by the forces of Damian Lacy. She is betrothed to his uncle, Sir Hugo, who leaves on a crusade. Rebels led by Ranald Lacy attempt to kidnap her, and Damian fights them off, but a confused sequence of events convinces the King that she and her beloved are in league against him. The Talisman takes place at the end of the Third Crusade, mostly in the camp of the Crusaders in Palestine. Scheming and partisan politics, as well as the illness of King Richard the Lionheart, are placing the Crusade in danger. The main characters are the Scottish knight Kenneth, a fictional version of David of Scotland, Earl of Huntingdon, who returned from the third Crusade in 1190; Richard the Lionheart; Saladin; and Edith Plantagenet, a relative of Richard. Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832) was a Scottish historical novelist, playwright and poet. He was the first modern English-language author to have a truly international career in his lifetime, with many contemporary readers in Europe, Australia, and North America. His novels and poetry are still read, and many of his works remain classics of both English-language literature and of Scottish literature. Famous titles include Ivanhoe, Rob Roy, The Lady of the Lake, Waverley, The Heart of Midlothian and The Bride of Lammermoor.
Table of Contents
RED CAP TALES
CERTAIN SMALL PHARAOHS THAT KNEW NOT JOSEPH
RED CAP TALES
TOLD FROM
WAVERLEY
THE FIRST TALE FROM "WAVERLEY"[1]
I. GOOD-BYE TO WAVERLEY-HONOUR
II. THE ENCHANTED CASTLE
III. THE BARON AND THE BEAR
THE FIRST INTERLUDE OF ACTION
THE SECOND TALE FROM "WAVERLEY"
I. THE CATTLE-LIFTING
II. THE ROBBER'S CAVE
THE SECOND INTERLUDE
THE THIRD TALE FROM "WAVERLEY"
I. THE CHIEF OF THE MAC-IVORS AND THE CHIEF'S SISTER
II. MISFORTUNES NEVER COME SINGLE
THE THIRD INTERLUDE—BEING MAINLY A FEW WORDS UPON HEROES
THE FOURTH TALE FROM "WAVERLEY"
HERE AND THERE AMONG THE HEATHER
INTERLUDE OF STICKING-PLASTER
THE FIFTH TALE FROM "WAVERLEY"
THE WHITE COCKADE
THE SIXTH TALE FROM "WAVERLEY"
BLACK LOOKS AND BRIGHT SWORDS
INTERLUDE OF BREVITY
THE LAST TALE FROM "WAVERLEY"
THE BARON'S SURPRISE
THE END OF THE LAST TALE FROM "WAVERLEY."
RED CAP TALES
TOLD FROM
GUY MANNERING
GUY MANNERING
WHERE WE TOLD THE SECOND TALE
A FIRST TALE FROM "GUY MANNERING"
I. WITCHCRAFT AND WIZARDRY
INTERLUDE OF INTERROGATION
THE SECOND TALE FROM "GUY MANNERING"
I. HAPPY DOMINIE SAMPSON
II. DANDIE DINMONT
III. IN THE LION'S MOUTH
INTERLUDE OF LOCALITY
THE THIRD TALE FROM "GUY MANNERING"
THE RETURN OF DIRK HATTERAICK
THE FOURTH TALE FROM "GUY MANNERING"
THE FIGHT IN THE CAVE
THE END OF THE FOURTH AND LAST TALE FROM "GUY MANNERING."
INTERLUDE OF CONSULTATION
RED CAP TALES
TOLD FROM
ROB ROY
THE FIRST TALE FROM "ROB ROY"
FRANK THE HIGHWAYMAN
INTERLUDE OF DISCUSSION
THE SECOND TALE FROM "ROB ROY"
I. IN THE TOILS OF RASHLEIGH
II. ROB ROY AT LAST
III. THE BAILIE FIGHTS WITH FIRE
IV. THE DROWNING OF THE SPY
INTERLUDE OF EXPOSTULATION
THE THIRD TALE FROM "ROB ROY"
I. IN THE HANDS OF THE PHILISTINES
II. THE ESCAPE
III. THE DEATH OF RASHLEIGH
THE END OF THE LAST TALE FROM "ROB ROY."
RED CAP TALES
TOLD FROM
THE ANTIQUARY
THE FIRST TALE FROM "THE ANTIQUARY"
I. THE MYSTERIOUS MR. LOVEL
II. THE NIGHT OF STORM
INTERLUDE OF WARNING
THE SECOND TALE FROM "THE ANTIQUARY"
I. LOVEL FIGHTS A DUEL
II. THE SEEKERS OF TREASURE
III. MISTICOT'S GRAVE
A QUITE SUPERFLUOUS INTERLUDE
THE THIRD TALE FROM "THE ANTIQUARY"
I. THE EARL'S SECRET
II. THE MOTHER'S VENGEANCE
III. THE HEIR OF GLENALLAN
THE END OF THE LAST TALE FROM "THE ANTIQUARY."

INTRODUCTION


But why should lordlings all our praise engross?

Rise, honest man, and sing the Man of Ross.

Pope

Having, in the tale of the Heart of Mid-Lothian, succeeded in some degree in awakening an interest in behalf of one devoid of those accomplishments which belong to a heroine almost by right, I was next tempted to choose a hero upon the same unpromising plan; and as worth of character, goodness of heart, and rectitude of principle, were necessary to one who laid no claim to high birth, romantic sensibility, or any of the usual accomplishments of those who strut through the pages of this sort of composition, I made free with the name of a person who has left the most magnificent proofs of his benevolence and charity that the capital of Scotland has to display.

To the Scottish reader little more need be said than that the man alluded to is George Heriot. But for those south of the Tweed, it may be necessary to add, that the person so named was a wealthy citizen of Edinburgh, and the King's goldsmith, who followed James to the English capital, and was so successful in his profession, as to die, in 1624, extremely wealthy for that period. He had no children; and after making a full provision for such relations as might have claims upon him, he left the residue of his fortune to establish an hospital, in which the sons of Edinburgh freemen are gratuitously brought up and educated for the station to which their talents may recommend them, and are finally enabled to enter life under respectable auspices. The hospital in which this charity is maintained is a noble quadrangle of the Gothic order, and as ornamental to the city as a building, as the manner in which the youths are provided for and educated, renders it useful to the community as an institution. To the honour of those who have the management, (the Magistrates and Clergy of Edinburgh), the funds of the Hospital have increased so much under their care, that it now supports and educates one hundred and thirty youths annually, many of whom have done honour to their country in different situations.

THE PREFACE TO THE ENSUING NARRATIVE.

Since it hath pleased the Almighty God, out of his infinite mercy, so to make us happy, by restoring of our native King to us, and us unto our native liberty through him, that now the good may say, magna temporum felicitas ubi sentire quoe velis, et dicere licet quoe sentias, we cannot but esteem ourselves engaged in the highest of degrees, to render unto him the highest thanks we can express. Although, surpris'd with joy, we become as lost in the performance; when gladness and admiration strikes us silent, as we look back upon the precipiece of our late condition, and those miraculous deliverances beyond expression. Freed from the slavery, and those desperate perils, we dayly lived in fear of, during the tyrannical times of that detestable usurper, Oliver Cromwell; he who had raked up such judges, as would wrest the most innocent language into high treason, when he had the cruel conscience to take away our lives, upon no other ground of justice or reason, (the stones of London streets would rise to witness it, if all the citizens were silent.) And with these judges had such councillors, as could advise him unto worse, which will less want of witness. For should the many auditors be silent, the press, (as God would have it,) hath given it us in print, where one of them (and his conscience-keeper, too,) speaks out. What shall we do with these men? saith he; Aeger intemperans crudelem facit medicum, et immedicabile vulmis ense recidendum. Who these men are that should be brought to such Scicilian vespers, the former page sets forth—those which conceit Utopias, and have their day-dreams of the return of I know not what golden age, with the old line. What usage, when such a privy councillor had power, could he expect, who then had published this narrative? This much so plainly shows the devil himself dislikt their doings, (so much more bad were they than he would have them be,) severer sure than was the devil to their Commissioners at Woodstock;


"'St. Ronan's Well' is not so much my favourite as certain of its predecessors," Lady Louisa Stuart wrote to Scott on March 26, 1824. "Yet still I see the author's hand in it, et c'est tout dire. Meg Dods, the meeting" (vol. i. chap. ix.), "and the last scene between Clara and her brother, are marked with the true stamp, not to be matched or mistaken. Is the Siege of Ptolemais really on the anvil?" she goes on, speaking of the projected Crusading Tales, and obviously anxious to part company with "St. Ronan's Well." All judgments have not agreed with Lady Louisa's. There is a literary legend or fable according to which a number of distinguished men, all admirers of Scott, wrote down separately the name of their favourite Waverley novel, and all, when the papers were compared, had written "St. Ronan's." Sydney Smith, writing to Constable on Dec. 28, 1823, described the new story as "far the best that has appeared for some time. Every now and then there is some mistaken or overcharged humour--but much excellent delineation of character, the story very well told, and the whole very interesting. Lady Binks, the old landlady, and Touchwood are all very good. Mrs. Blower particularly so. So are MacTurk and Lady Penelope. I wish he would give his people better names; Sir Bingo Binks is quite ridiculous.... The curtain should have dropped on finding Clara's glove. Some of the serious scenes with Clara and her brother are very fine: the knife scene masterly. In her light and gay moments Clara is very vulgar; but Sir Walter always fails in well-bred men and women, and yet who has seen more of both? and who, in the ordinary intercourse of society, is better bred? Upon the whole, I call this a very successful exhibition."
INTRODUCTION TO THE TALISMAN.

The "Betrothed" did not greatly please one or two friends, who thought that it did not well correspond to the general title of "The Crusaders." They urged, therefore, that, without direct allusion to the manners of the Eastern tribes, and to the romantic conflicts of the period, the title of a "Tale of the Crusaders" would resemble the playbill, which is said to have announced the tragedy of Hamlet, the character of the Prince of Denmark being left out. On the other hand, I felt the difficulty of giving a vivid picture of a part of the world with which I was almost totally unacquainted, unless by early recollections of the Arabian Nights' Entertainments; and not only did I labour under the incapacity of ignorance--in which, as far as regards Eastern manners, I was as thickly wrapped as an Egyptian in his fog--but my contemporaries were, many of them, as much enlightened upon the subject as if they had been inhabitants of the favoured land of Goshen. The love of travelling had pervaded all ranks, and carried the subjects of Britain into all quarters of the world. Greece, so attractive by its remains of art, by its struggles for freedom against a Mohammedan tyrant, by its very name, where every fountain had its classical legend--Palestine, endeared to the imagination by yet more sacred remembrances--had been of late surveyed by British eyes, and described by recent travellers. Had I, therefore, attempted the difficult task of substituting manners of my own invention, instead of the genuine costume of the East, almost every traveller I met who had extended his route beyond what was anciently called "The Grand Tour," had acquired a right, by ocular inspection, to chastise me for my presumption. Every member of the Travellers' Club who could pretend to have thrown his shoe over Edom was, by having done so, constituted my lawful critic and corrector. It occurred, therefore, that where the author of Anastasius, as well as he of Hadji Baba, had described the manners and vices of the Eastern nations, not only with fidelity, but with the humour of Le Sage and the ludicrous power of Fielding himself, one who was a perfect stranger to the subject must necessarily produce an unfavourable contrast. The Poet Laureate also, in the charming tale of "Thalaba," had shown how extensive might be the researches of a person of acquirements and talent, by dint of investigation alone, into the ancient doctrines, history, and manners of the Eastern countries, in which we are probably to look for the cradle of mankind; Moore, in his "Lalla Rookh," had successfully trod the same path; in which, too, Byron, joining ocular experience to extensive reading, had written some of his most attractive poems. In a word, the Eastern themes had been already so successfully handled by those who were acknowledged to be masters of their craft, that I was diffident of making the attempt.

INTRODUCTION TO THE TALES OF MY LANDLORD.

As I may, without vanity, presume that the name and official description prefixed to this Proem will secure it, from the sedate and reflecting part of mankind, to whom only I would be understood to address myself, such attention as is due to the sedulous instructor of youth, and the careful performer of my Sabbath duties, I will forbear to hold up a candle to the daylight, or to point out to the judicious those recommendations of my labours which they must necessarily anticipate from the perusal of the title-page. Nevertheless, I am not unaware, that, as Envy always dogs Merit at the heels, there may be those who will whisper, that albeit my learning and good principles cannot (lauded be the heavens) be denied by any one, yet that my situation at Gandercleugh hath been more favourable to my acquisitions in learning than to the enlargement of my views of the ways and works of the present generation. To the which objection, if, peradventure, any such shall be started, my answer shall be threefold:

First, Gandercleugh is, as it were, the central part—the navel (si fas sit dicere) of this our native realm of Scotland; so that men, from every corner thereof, when travelling on their concernments of business, either towards our metropolis of law, by which I mean Edinburgh, or towards our metropolis and mart of gain, whereby I insinuate Glasgow, are frequently led to make Gandercleugh their abiding stage and place of rest for the night. And it must be acknowledged by the most sceptical, that I, who have sat in the leathern armchair, on the left-hand side of the fire, in the common room of the Wallace Inn, winter and summer, for every evening in my life, during forty years bypast, (the Christian Sabbaths only excepted,) must have seen more of the manners and customs of various tribes and people, than if I had sought them out by my own painful travel and bodily labour. Even so doth the tollman at the well-frequented turnpike on the Wellbrae-head, sitting at his ease in his own dwelling, gather more receipt of custom, than if, moving forth upon the road, he were to require a contribution from each person whom he chanced to meet in his journey, when, according to the vulgar adage, he might possibly be greeted with more kicks than halfpence.

But, secondly, supposing it again urged, that Ithacus, the most wise of the Greeks, acquired his renown, as the Roman poet hath assured us, by visiting states and men, I reply to the Zoilus who shall adhere to this objection, that, de facto, I have seen states and men also; for I have visited the famous cities of Edinburgh and Glasgow, the former twice, and the latter three times, in the course of my earthly pilgrimage. And, moreover, I had the honour to sit in the General Assembly (meaning, as an auditor, in the galleries thereof,) and have heard as much goodly speaking on the law of patronage, as, with the fructification thereof in mine own understanding, hath made me be considered as an oracle upon that doctrine ever since my safe and happy return to Gandercleugh.

I. INTRODUCTION TO A LEGEND OF MONTROSE.

The Legend of Montrose was written chiefly with a view to place before the reader the melancholy fate of John Lord Kilpont, eldest son of William Earl of Airth and Menteith, and the singular circumstances attending the birth and history of James Stewart of Ardvoirlich, by whose hand the unfortunate nobleman fell.

Our subject leads us to talk of deadly feuds, and we must begin with one still more ancient than that to which our story relates. During the reign of James IV., a great feud between the powerful families of Drummond and Murray divided Perthshire. The former, being the most numerous and powerful, cooped up eight score of the Murrays in the kirk of Monivaird, and set fire to it. The wives and the children of the ill-fated men, who had also found shelter in the church, perished by the same conflagration. One man, named David Murray, escaped by the humanity of one of the Drummonds, who received him in his arms as he leaped from amongst the flames. As King James IV. ruled with more activity than most of his predecessors, this cruel deed was severely revenged, and several of the perpetrators were beheaded at Stirling. In consequence of the prosecution against his clan, the Drummond by whose assistance David Murray had escaped, fled to Ireland, until, by means of the person whose life he had saved, he was permitted to return to Scotland, where he and his descendants were distinguished by the name of Drummond-Eirinich, or Ernoch, that is, Drummond of Ireland; and the same title was bestowed on their estate.

The Drummond-ernoch of James the Sixth's time was a king's forester in the forest of Glenartney, and chanced to be employed there in search of venison about the year 1588, or early in 1589. This forest was adjacent to the chief haunts of the MacGregors, or a particular race of them, known by the title of MacEagh, or Children of the Mist. They considered the forester's hunting in their vicinity as an aggression, or perhaps they had him at feud, for the apprehension or slaughter of some of their own name, or for some similar reason. This tribe of MacGregors were outlawed and persecuted, as the reader may see in the Introduction to ROB ROY; and every man's hand being against them, their hand was of course directed against every man. In short, they surprised and slew Drummond-ernoch, cut off his head, and carried it with them, wrapt in the corner of one of their plaids.

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