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No Hindu god is closer to the soul of poetry than Krishna, and in North India no poet ever sang of Krishna more famously than SūrdD=as-or Sūr, for short. He lived in the sixteenth century and became so influential that for centuries afterward aspiring Krishna poets signed their compositions orally with his name. This book takes us back to the source, offering a selection of Sūrd=as's poems that were known and sung in the sixteenth century itself. Here we have poems of war, poems to the great rivers, poems of wit and rage, poems where the poet spills out his disappointments. Most of all, though, we have the memory of love-poems that adopt the voices of the women of Krishna's natal Braj country and evoke the power of being pulled into his irresistible orbit. Following the lead of several old manuscripts, Jack Hawley arranges these poems in such a way that they tell us Krishna's life story from birth to full maturity. These lyrics from Sūr's Ocean (the Sūrs=agar) were composed in the very tongue Hindus believe Krishna himself must have spoken: Brajbh=as=a, the language of Braj, a variety of Hindi. Hawley prepares the way for his verse translations with an introduction that explains what we know of Sūrd=as and describes the basic structure of his poems. For readers new to Krishna's world or to the subtleties of a poet like Sūrd=as, Hawley also provides a substantial set of analytical notes. "Sūr is the sun," as a familiar saying has it, and we feel the warmth of his light in these pages.
The Indian state of West Bengal is home to one of the world's most vibrant traditions of goddess worship. The year's biggest holidays are devoted to the goddesses Durga and Kali, with lavish rituals, decorated statues, fireworks, and parades. In Offering Flowers, Feeding Skulls, June McDaniel provides a broad, accessibly written overview of Bengali goddess worship. McDaniel identifies three major forms of goddess worship, and examines each through its myths, folklore, songs, rituals, sacred texts, and practitioners. In the folk/tribal strand, which is found in rural areas, local tribal goddesses are worshipped alongside Hindu goddesses, with an emphasis on possession, healing, and animism. The tantric/yogic strand focuses on ritual, meditation, and visualization as ways of experiencing the power of the goddess directly. The devotional or bhakti strand, which is the most popular form, involves the intense love and worship of a particular form of the goddess. McDaniel traces these strands through Bengali culture and explores how they are interwoven with each other as well as with other forms of Hinduism. She also discusses how these practices have been reinterpreted in the West, where goddess worship has gained the values of sexual freedom and psychological healing, but lost its emphases on devotion and asceticism. Offering Flowers, Feeding Skulls takes the reader inside the lives of practicing Shaktas, including holy women, hymn singers, philosophers, visionaries, gurus, ascetics, healers, musicians, and businessmen, and offers vivid descriptions of their rituals, practices, and daily lives. Drawing on years of fieldwork and extensive research, McDaniel paints a rich, expansive portrait of this fascinating religious tradition.
What religion does not serve as a theater of tears? Holy Tears addresses this all but universal phenomenon with passion and precision, ranging from Mycenaean Greece up through the tragedy of 9/11. Sixteen authors, including many leading voices in the study of religion, offer essays on specific topics in religious weeping while also considering broader issues such as gender, memory, physiology, and spontaneity. A comprehensive, elegantly written introduction offers a key to these topics. Given the pervasiveness of its theme, it is remarkable that this book is the first of its kind--and it is long overdue.

The essays ask such questions as: Is religious weeping primal or culturally constructed? Is it universal? Is it spontaneous? Does God ever cry? Is religious weeping altered by sexual or social roles? Is it, perhaps, at once scripted and spontaneous, private and communal? Is it, indeed, divine?


The grief occasioned by 9/11 and violence in Afghanistan, Iraq, Israel, and elsewhere offers a poignant context for this fascinating and richly detailed book. Holy Tears concludes with a compelling meditation on the theology of weeping that emerged from pastoral responses to 9/11, as described in the editors' interview with Reverend Betsee Parker, who became head chaplain for the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner of New York City and leader of the multifaith chaplaincy team at Ground Zero.


The contributors are Diane Apostolos-Cappadona, Amy Bard, Herbert Basser, Santha Bhattacharji, William Chittick, Gary Ebersole, M. David Eckel, John Hawley, Gay Lynch, Jacob Olúpqnà (with Solá Ajíbádé), Betsee Parker, Kimberley Patton, Nehemia Polen, Kay Read, and Kallistos Ware.

This is Swami Venkatesananda's longer Yoga Vasistha. Its purpose is to provide a means to eliminate psychological conditioning and to attain liberation. Containing the instructions of the sage Vasistha to Lord Rama, this scripture is full of intricately woven tales, the kind a great teacher might tell to hold the interest of a student.

Table of Contents


Blessing
Scheme of Transliteration
Foreword

Introduction

Prayer

Part One: On Dispassion

Part Two: On the Behaviour of the Seeker
The Story of Suka
Self-effort

Part Three: On Creation
The Story of Lila
The Story of Karkati
The Story of the Sons of Indu
The Story of Ahalya
The Story of the Great Forest
The Story of the Three Non-existent Princes
The Story of Lavana

Part Four: On Existence
The Story of Sukra
The Story of Dama, Vyala and Kata
The Story of Bhima, Bhasa and Drdha
The Story of Dasura
Kaca's Story

Part Five: On Dissolution
The Story of King Janaka
The Story of Punya and Pavana
The Story of Bali
The Story of Prahlada
The Story of Gadhi
The Story of Uddalaka
The Story of Suraghu
The Story of Bhasa and Vilasa
The Story of Vitahavya

Part Six: On Liberation
Discourse on Brahman
The Story of Bhusunda
Description of the Lord
Deva Puja
The Story of the Wood apple
The Story of the Rock
The Story of Arjuna
The Story of the Hundred Rudras
The Story of the Vampire
The Story of Bhagiratha
The Story of Sikhidvaja and Cudala
The Story of the Philosopher's Stone
The Story of Cintamani
The Story of the Foolish Elephant
The Story of Kaca
The Story of the Deluded Man
The Story of Bhrngisa
The Story of Iksvaku
The World Within the Rock
The Story of the Sage from Outer Space
The Story of Vipascit
The Story of the Hunter and the Deer
The Story of Kundadanta

Index
“Desire is here to stay. The challenge we all face, and which I intend to guide you through, is to learn how to take into account the full measure of who you are and use the positive force of all four of your soul’s desires to lead you to your best life.”
—Rod Stryker

According to ancient Yogic tradition, your soul has four distinct desires:
 
• The desire for purpose, the drive to become who you are meant to be
• The desire for the means (money, security, health) to prosper in this world
• The desire for pleasures like intimacy, beauty, and love
• The desire for spiritual fulfillment and lasting freedom
 
Learning to honor these four desires is the key to happiness, and to a complete and balanced life. But how can you discern what will truly satisfy your desires? How can you increase your capacity to achieve them? What if your desires seem to conflict with one another? Is it really possible to live a spiritual life while also wanting material pleasures and success?

For more than three decades, master teacher Rod Stryker has taught yoga in the context of its deepest philosophy. His course, called The Yoga of Fulfillment™, has helped thousands recognize their soul’s call to greatness and to achieve their dreams. Now, in this wise and richly practical book, he has distilled those broad teachings into a roadmap for becoming the person you were meant to be. It is filled with revealing true stories, provocative exercises, and practices for unlocking your inner guidance. And even if you’ve never done a yoga pose, you can follow this step-by-step process to:
 
• discover your soul’s unique purpose—the one you came into this world to fulfill.
• recognize the goal(s) you need to focus on at any given time and enliven your capacity to reach them.
• overcome self-defeating ideas and behavior.
• recruit your deepest energies and strengthen your resolve to meet any challenge.
• learn to live with joy at every stage of your growth.
 
The Four Desires is nothing less than a complete path toward living your best life possible—a life that is rich in meaning and in means, a life that attracts and emanates happiness, a life that is your unique gift to yourself and the world.
Best Hanuman chalisa book on play store with Images, Awadhi and English pronunciation, hindi & english translation. The book also contains shri hanuman aarti, shri sankat mochan hanumanastak, shri bajrang baan, shri ram stuti with meaning, shri ram aarti" 


facebook : http://bit.ly/hanumanChalisa


CONTENTS :

1. श्री हनुमान चालीसा - अंग्रेजी व अवधी भाषा में उच्चारण, अंग्रेजी व हिंदी भाषा में अर्थ व चित्र सहित ( shri Hanuman chalisa with images, awadhi and english pronunciation, hindi & english translation )

2. श्री हनुमानजी की आरती ( shri hanuman aarti )

3. श्री संकटमोचन हनुमानाष्टक ( shri sankat mochan hanumanastak )

4. श्री बजरंग बाण ( shri bajrang baan )

5. श्री राम स्तुति-अर्थ सहित ( shri ram stuti with meaning )

6. श्री राम आरती ( shri ram aarti )

If you like this book then please appreciate it by giving 5 Stars.

ABOUT HANUMAN CHALISA :

The Hanuman Chalisa (Devanagari: हनुमान चालीसा; Hindi pronunciation: [ɦənʊmaːn tʃaːliːsaː]; literally Forty chaupais on Hanuman) is a Hindu devotional hymn (stotra) addressed to Hanuman.

 It is traditionally believed to have been authored by 16th-century poet Tulsidas in the Awadhi language,  and is his best known text apart from the Ramcharitmanas.  The word "chālīsā" is derived from "chālīs", which means the number forty in Hindi, as the Hanuman Chalisa has 40 verses (excluding the couplets at the beginning and at the end).

Hanuman is a vanara (a monkey-like humanoid deity), a devotee of Rama, and one of the central characters in the Sanskrit epic Ramayana. Folk tales increasingly eulogise the powers of Hanuman, and he is considered by many to be an avatar of the god Shiva.  The qualities of Hanuman – his strength, courage, wisdom, celibacy, devotion to Rama and the many names by which he was known – are detailed in the Hanuman Chalisa.  There are more temples devoted to Hanuman than any other deity in India, and recitation or chanting of the Hanuman Chalisa is a common religious practice.


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**जय श्री राम **

An extensive look at all the aspects of multi-natured Shiva

• Explores the shamanic roots of world spirituality as exemplified by this Hindu god who shares many of the attributes of the Norse Odin and the Celtic Cernunnos

• Looks at Shiva’s relation to contemporary culture, Tantra, and the dualistic religions of the West

To his devotees Shiva is the entire universe and the core of all beings. Hindu myth shows him appearing at the beginning of creation as a giant pillar of fire from which this world sprang forth. Yet he is also the most approachable of gods, for he is the lover of lovers and the devotee of his devotees. Of the 1,008 names of Shiva, Pashupati, Lord of Animals, is one of the most common. His special relation to animals along with his trickster nature reveal the deep connection of Shiva to shamanism and other gods such as the Norse Odin and the Celtic Cernunnos that came out of the Paleolithic traditions.

Ethnologist Wolf-Dieter Storl was first captivated by Shiva when he was in India as a visiting scholar at Benares Hindu University. In this book he invites readers to join in the lively and mythical world of Shiva, or Mahadev, God of All Gods. Shiva is a study in contrasts: As the lord of dance he loses himself in ecstatic abandon; with his consort Parvati he can make love for 10,000 years. Both men and women worship him for his ability to unite and balance masculine and feminine energies. But as the ascetic Shankar he sits in deep meditation, shunning women, and none dare disturb him lest he open his third eye and immolate the entire universe. Lord of intoxicants and poisons, he is the keeper of secret occult knowledge and powers, for which he is worshipped by yogis and demons alike. Shiva dances both the joy of being and the dance of doom--but in every aspect he breaks through the false ego to reveal the true self lying within. This is his true power.
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