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The release of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Version 5 (DSM-5) marked one of the biggest changes to the field of mental health diagnosis in over 20 years. DSM-5 Insanely Simplified provides a summary of key concepts of the new diagnostic schema including a section on the upcoming ICD-10. DSM-5 Insanely Simplified utilizes a variety of devices to help clinicians memorize complex criteria and ideas about the different diagnoses. Cartoons, mnemonic devices, and summary tables allow clinicians and students to quickly grasp and retain broad concepts and subtle nuances related to psychiatric diagnosis. DSM-5 Insanely Simplified fosters quick mastery of the most important concepts introduced in DSM-5 while offering an entirely new way of looking at mental health along a continuum. This new approach avoids simply "labeling" clients by placing them along spectrums that range from normal to problematic symptoms. Mental health professionals as well as laymen interested in a deeper understanding of emotional well-being will appreciate the synthesis of deep psychology and modern approaches to diagnosis.

Steven Buser trained in medicine at Duke University and served 12 years as a physician in the US Air Force. He is a graduate of the two-year Clinical Training Program at the CG Jung Institute of Chicago and is a co-founder of the Asheville Jung Center. In addition to a busy psychiatric private practice he serves as Publisher for Chiron Publications. He is active in the community and strives to integrate faith and spirituality into psychotherapy. He resides in the mountains in Asheville, NC with his wife and two children.

Len Cruz is the Editor-in-Chief of Chiron Publications, a book publishing company specializing in psychology, mythology, religion, and culture and a co-founder of the Asheville Jung Center. He is a psychiatrist who resides in Western North Carolina.

Luke Sloan was a 5th grade student in Asheville, NC when he completed the illustrations for this book. When he's not drawing, Luke enjoys playing soccer, reading books, snow-skiing, and just plain having fun!
We've all felt occasional pangs of shyness and self-consciousness, but for the 15 million Americans with social anxiety disorder, the fear of being scrutinized and criticized can reach disabling proportions. Such was the case for Emily Ford, who shares her firsthand experiences in these pages. Emily's true story of fear, struggle, and ultimate triumph is sure to resonate with other socially anxious teenagers and young adults. Emily's frank, often witty, sometimes poignant account of how she negotiated all the obstacles of social anxiety--and eventually overcame them with the help of therapy and hard work--makes for compelling reading. Yet this book is more than just a memoir. Emily's story is coupled with the latest medical and scientific information about the causes, diagnosis, treatment, and self-management of social anxiety disorder (or SAD). Readers will find a wealth of solid advice and genuine inspiration here. In engaging, accessible language--and with the help of psychiatrist Michael Liebowitz--she discusses what is known and not known about social anxiety disorder in adolescents. She outlines the various psychotherapies available for those with SAD and explains how to seek professional help, how to talk to family and friends about the illness, and how to handle difficult social situations. The result is both an absorbing story and a useful guide that will help to ease the isolation caused by SAD, encouraging young people to believe that, with commitment and hard work, they can overcome this illness. Part of the Adolescent Mental Health Initiative series of books written specifically for teens and young adults, What You Must Think of Me will also be a valuable resource for friends and family of those with SAD. It offers much-needed hope to young people, helping them to overcome this illness and lead healthy, productive lives.
"In all my years studying personal growth, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy is one of the most useful tools I've ever come across, and in this book, Dr. Hayes describes it with more depth and clarity than ever before."-Mark Manson, #1 New York Times best-selling author of The Subtle Art of Not Giving a F*ck

Life is not a problem to be solved. ACT shows how we can live full and meaningful lives by embracing our vulnerability and turning toward what hurts.

In this landmark book, the originator and pioneering researcher into Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) lays out the psychological flexibility skills that make it one of the most powerful approaches research has yet to offer. These skills have been shown to help even where other approaches have failed. Science shows that they are useful in virtually every area--mental health (anxiety, depression, substance abuse, eating disorders, PTSD); physical health (chronic pain, dealing with diabetes, facing cancer); social processes (relationship issues, prejudice, stigma, domestic violence); and performance (sports, business, diet, exercise).

How does psychological flexibility help? We struggle because the problem-solving mind tells us to run from what causes us fear and hurt. But we hurt where we care. If we run from a sense of vulnerability, we must also run from what we care about. By learning how to liberate ourselves, we can live with meaning and purpose, along with our pain when there is pain.

Although that is a simple idea, it resists our instincts and programming. The flexibility skills counter those ingrained tendencies. They include noticing our thoughts with curiosity, opening to our emotions, attending to what is in the present, learning the art of perspective taking, discovering our deepest values, and building habits based around what we deeply want.

Beginning with the epiphany Steven Hayes had during a panic attack, this book is a powerful narrative of scientific discovery filled with moving stories as well as advice for how we can put flexibility skills to work immediately. Hayes shows how allowing ourselves to feel fully and think freely moves us toward commitment to what truly matters to us. Finally, we can live lives that reflect the qualities we choose.
From the Executive Director of Mental Health for Correctional Services in New York City, comes a revelatory and deeply compassionate memoir that takes readers inside Bellevue, and brings to life the world—the system, the staff, and the haunting cases—that shaped one young psychiatrist as she learned how to doctor and how to love.

Elizabeth Ford went through medical school unsure of where she belonged. It wasn’t until she did her psychiatry rotation that she found her calling—to care for one of the most vulnerable populations of mentally ill people, the inmates of New York's jails, including Rikers Island, who are so sick that they are sent to the Bellevue Hospital Prison Ward for care.

These men were broken, unloved, without resources or support, and very ill. They could be violent, unpredictable, but they could also be funny and tender and needy. Mostly, they were human and they awakened in Ford a boundless compassion. Her patients made her a great doctor and a better person and, as she treated these men, she learned about doctoring, about nurturing, about parenting, and about love.

While Ford was a psychiatrist at Bellevue she becomes a wife and a mother. In her book she shares her struggles to balance her life and her work, to care for her children and her patients, and to maintain the empathy that is essential to her practice—all in the face of a jaded institution, an exhausting workload, and the deeply emotionally taxing nature of her work.

Ford brings humor, grace, and humanity to the lives of the patients in her care and in beautifully rendered prose illuminates the inner workings (and failings) of our mental health system, our justice system, and the prison system.
This acclaimed work, now in a new edition, has introduced tens of thousands of clinicians to mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) for depression, an 8-week program with proven effectiveness. Step by step, the authors explain the "whys" and "how-tos" of conducting mindfulness practices and cognitive interventions that have been shown to bolster recovery from depression and prevent relapse. Clinicians are also guided to practice mindfulness themselves, an essential prerequisite to teaching others. Forty-five reproducible handouts are included. Purchasers get access to a companion website featuring downloadable audio recordings of the guided mindfulness practices (meditations and mindful movement), plus all of the reproducibles, ready to download and print in a convenient 8 1/2" x 11" size. A separate website for use by clients features the audio recordings only.

New to This Edition
*Incorporates a decade's worth of developments in MBCT clinical practice and training.
*Chapters on additional treatment components: the pre-course interview and optional full-day retreat.
*Chapters on self-compassion, the inquiry process, and the three-minute breathing space.
*Findings from multiple studies of MBCT's effectiveness and underlying mechanisms. Includes studies of adaptations for treating psychological and physical health problems other than depression.
*Audio files of the guided mindfulness practices, narrated by the authors, on two separate Web pages--one for professionals, together with the reproducibles, and one just for clients.

See also the authors' related titles for clients: The Mindful Way through Depression demonstrates these proven strategies in a self-help format, with in-depth stories and examples. The Mindful Way Workbook gives clients additional, explicit support for building their mindfulness practice, following the sequence of the MBCT program. Plus, for professionals: Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy with People at Risk of Suicide extends and refines MBCT for clients with suicidal depression.
“A gem of a memoir . . . Holland takes us for a ride through the psych ER that is at once wild and poignant, a ride that leaves deep tracks in even the healthiest of minds.”—Katrina Firlik, M.D., author of Another Day in the Frontal Lobe

Julie Holland thought she knew what crazy was. Then she came to Bellevue. For nine eventful years, Dr. Holland was the weekend physician in charge of the psychiatric emergency room at New York City’s Bellevue Hospital. In this absorbing memoir, Holland recounts stories from her vast case files that are alternately terrifying, tragically comic, and profoundly moving: the serial killer, the naked man barking like a dog in Times Square, the schizophrenic begging for an injection of club soda to quiet the voices in his head, the subway conductor who helplessly watched a young woman pushed into the path of his train. Writing with uncommon candor, Holland supplies not only a page-turner with all the fast-paced immediacy of a TV medical drama but also a fascinating glimpse into the inner lives of doctors who struggle to maintain perspective in a world where sanity is in the eye of the beholder. 

Praise for Weekends at Bellevue

“An extraordinary insider’s look at the typical days and nights of that most extraordinary place, written with a rare combination of toughness, tenderness, and outrageous humor.”—Andrew Weil, M.D. 

“Unforgettable . . . tells a mean story.”—New York Daily News 

“The tension between [Holland’s] macho swagger and her shame at the harsh way she occasionally treats patients gives this memoir extra intrigue.”—Psychology Today 

“A fascinating portrait . . . Holland is a good storyteller with a dark wit.” —New York Post “Equal parts affecting, jaw-dropping, and engrossing.”—Booklist
This volume provides the definitive guide to Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), the psychotherapeutic approach developed by Francine Shapiro. EMDR is one of the most widely investigated treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder, and many other applications are also being explored. Presenting background on EMDR?s development, theoretical constructs, and possible underlying mechanisms, the volume also contains detailed descriptions and transcripts that guide the clinician through every stage of therapeutic treatment, from client selection to the administration of EMDR and its integration within a comprehensive treatment plan. Among the many clinical populations for whom the material in this volume has been seen as applicable are survivors of sexual abuse, crime, and combat, as well as sufferers of phobias and other experientially based disorders. Special feature: Two online-only appendices were added in 2009 (www.guilford.com/EMDR-appendices). These appendices comprehensively review current research on EMDR and its clinical applications.

EMDR is now recognized by the American Psychiatric Association as an effective treatment for ameliorating symptoms of both acute and chronic PTSD (APA Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Patients with Acute Stress Disorder and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder).

New to This Edition:
*Updated neurobiological data, findings from controlled clinical studies, and literature on emerging clinical applications.
*Updated protocols and procedures for working with adults and children with a range of presenting problems.
From Marsha M. Linehan--the developer of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT)--this comprehensive resource provides vital tools for implementing DBT skills training. The reproducible teaching notes, handouts, and worksheets used for over two decades by hundreds of thousands of practitioners have been significantly revised and expanded to reflect important research and clinical advances. The book gives complete instructions for orienting clients to DBT, plus teaching notes for the full range of mindfulness, interpersonal effectiveness, emotion regulation, and distress tolerance skills. Handouts and worksheets are not included in the book; purchasers get access to a Web page where they can download and print all the handouts and worksheets discussed, as well as the teaching notes. The companion volume is available separately: DBT® Skills Training Handouts and Worksheets, Second Edition.

New to This Edition
*Handouts and worksheets (available online and in the companion volume) have been completely revised and dozens more added--more than 225 in all.
*Each module has been expanded with additional skills.
*Multiple alternative worksheets to tailor treatment to each client.
*More extensive reproducible teaching notes (provided in the book and online), with numerous clinical examples.
*Curricula for running skills training groups of different durations and with specific populations, such as adolescents and clients with substance use problems.
*Linehan provides a concise overview of "How to Use This Book."
 
See also DBT® Skills Training Handouts and Worksheets, Second Edition, a spiral-bound 8 1/2" x 11" volume containing all of the handouts and worksheets and featuring brief introductions to each module written expressly for clients. Plus, Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder, the authoritative presentation of DBT. Also available: Linehan's instructive skills training videos for clients--Crisis Survival Skills: Part One, Crisis Survival Skills: Part Two, From Suffering to Freedom, This One Moment, and Opposite Action.
Whether called black sheep, sociopaths, con men, or misfits, some men break all the rules. They shirk everyday responsibilities, abuse drugs and alcohol, take up criminal careers , and lash out at family members. In the worst cases, they commit rape, murder, and other acts of extreme violence. What makes these men behave as if they had no conscience? Bad Boys, Bad Men examines antisocial personality disorder or ASP, the mysterious mental condition that underlies this lifelong penchant for bad behavior. Psychiatrist and researcher Donald W. Black, MD, draws on case studies, scientific data, and current events to explore antisocial behavior and to chart the history, nature, and treatment of a misunderstood disorder that affects up to seven million Americans. Citing new evidence from genetics and neuroscience, Black argues that this condition is tied to biological causes and that some people are simply born bad. Bad Boys, Bad Men introduces us to people like Ernie, the quintessential juvenile delinquent who had an incestuous relationship with his mother and descended into crime and alcoholism; and John Wayne Gacy, the notorious serial killer whose lifelong pattern of misbehavior escalated to the rape and murder of more than 30 young men and boys. These compelling cases read like medical detective stories as Black tries to separate the lies these men tell from the facts of their lives. For this Revised and Updated edition, Dr. Black includes new research findings, including the most recent work on the genetic and biological determinants of antisocial personality disorder, and he also discusses the difference between, and overlap with, psychopathy. Several new cases have been added to Bad Boys, Bad Men, including Mike Tyson and Saddam Hussein, and he also briefly discusses antisocial women such as Aileen Wuornos, the lead character in the movie, Monster. Acclaim for the first edition: "For a fascinating and insightful journey inside the criminal mind one could not find a better guide than Dr. Donald Black, one of the world's leading authorities on the classification of aberrant behaviorsEL. A magnificent achievement." --Jeffrey M. Schwartz, M.D., author of Brain Lock "Clearly written, informative, and filled with intriguing stories of real people....Tells us what we need to know about antisocial personality disorder. A wonderful book." --John M. Oldham, MD, Columbia University "A clear and thorough account of the current scientific understanding of a baffling condition, Bad Boys, Bad Men will appeal to those interested in the origins of repetitive criminal behavior. The book will be of especial use to the families of the antisocial." --Peter D. Kramer, author of Listening to Prozac "A tour de force. Don Black has distilled decades of his clinical experience and a comprehensive review of research on antisocial personality disorder into the definitive vade mecum on the topic." --John H. Greist, M.D., Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin Medical School
Mind Fixers tells the history of psychiatry’s quest to understand the biological basis of mental illness and asks where we need to go from here.

In Mind Fixers, Anne Harrington, author of The Cure Within, explores psychiatry’s repeatedly frustrated struggle to understand mental disorder in biomedical terms. She shows how the stalling of early twentieth century efforts in this direction allowed Freudians and social scientists to insist, with some justification, that they had better ways of analyzing and fixing minds.

But when the Freudians overreached, they drove psychiatry into a state of crisis that a new “biological revolution” was meant to alleviate. Harrington shows how little that biological revolution had to do with breakthroughs in science, and why the field has fallen into a state of crisis in our own time.

Mind Fixers makes clear that psychiatry’s waxing and waning biological enthusiasms have been shaped not just by developments in the clinic and lab, but also by a surprising range of social factors, including immigration, warfare, grassroots activism, and assumptions about race and gender. Government programs designed to empty the state mental hospitals, acrid rivalries between different factions in the field, industry profit mongering, consumerism, and an uncritical media have all contributed to the story as well.

In focusing particularly on the search for the biological roots of schizophrenia, depression, and bipolar disorder, Harrington underscores the high human stakes for the millions of people who have sought medical answers for their mental suffering. This is not just a story about doctors and scientists, but about countless ordinary people and their loved ones.

A clear-eyed, evenhanded, and yet passionate tour de force, Mind Fixers recounts the past and present struggle to make mental illness a biological problem in order to lay the groundwork for creating a better future, both for those who suffer and for those whose job it is to care for them.

With time at a premium, today's clinicians must rapidly engage their patients while gathering an imposingly large amount of critical information. These clinicians appropriately worry that the "person" beneath the diagnoses will be lost in the shuffle of time constraints, data gathering, and the creation of the electronic health record. Psychiatric Interviewing: The Art of Understanding: A Practical Guide for Psychiatrists, Psychologists, Counselors, Social Workers, Nurses, and other Mental Health Professionals, 3rd Edition tackles these problems head-on, providing flexible and practical solutions for gathering critical information while always attending to the concerns and unique needs of the patient.

Within the text, Dr. Shea deftly integrates interviewing techniques from a variety of professional disciplines from psychiatry to clinical psychology, social work, and counseling providing a broad scope of theoretical foundation. Written in the same refreshing, informal writing style that made the first two editions best sellers, the text provides a compelling introduction to all of the core interviewing skills from conveying empathy, effectively utilizing open-ended questions, and forging a powerful therapeutic alliance to sensitively structuring the interview while understanding nonverbal communication at a sophisticated level. Updated to the DSM-5, the text also illustrates how to arrive at a differential diagnosis in a humanistic, caring fashion with the patient treated as a person, not just another case.

Whether the reader is a psychiatric resident or a graduate student in clinical psychology, social work, counseling or psychiatric nursing, the updated third edition is designed to prepare the trainee to function effectively in the hectic worlds of community mental health centers, inpatient units, emergency rooms, and university counseling centers. To do so, the pages are filled with sample questions and examples of interviewing dialogue that bring to life methods for sensitively exploring difficult topics such as domestic violence, drug abuse, incest, antisocial behavior, and taking a sexual history as well as performing complex processes such as the mental status. The expanded chapter on suicide assessment includes an introduction to the internationally acclaimed interviewing strategy for uncovering suicidal ideation, the Chronological Assessment of Suicide Events (CASE Approach). Dr. Shea, the creator of the CASE Approach, then illustrates its techniques in a compelling video demonstrating its effective use in an interview involving a complex presentation of suicidal planning and intent

.A key aspect of this text is its unique appeal to both novice and experienced clinicians. It is designed to grow with the reader as they progress through their graduate training, while providing a reference that the reader will pull off the shelf many times in their subsequent career as a mental health professional. Perhaps the most unique aspect in this regard is the addition of five complete chapters on Advanced and Specialized Interviewing (which comprise Part IV of the book) which appear as bonus chapters in the accompanying e-book without any additional cost to the reader. With over 310 pages, this web-based bonus section provides the reader with essentially two books for the price of one, acquiring not only the expanded core textbook but a set of independent monographs on specialized skill sets that the reader and/or faculty can add to their curriculum as they deem fit.

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