More related to globalization

The re-emergence of the city from the long shadow of the state in the late-twentieth century was facilitated by the state itself. The unprecedented size and scale of today's global cities and mega cities owe their conditions of possibility to a fundamental shift in the character of political order at the level of the international system. This book argues that we must understand the rise of the global city as part of a wider process of the transformation of international political order, and of the character of international society. Global cities are an inscription of the ideals of a market society in space, constructed and defended at the level of international society. They embody the ascendance of a set of liberal principles at a certain moment in history - a moment related to the hegemonic status of leading states in the second half of the twentieth century, and the ability of those states to shape international norms. But the evolution of these urban forms has also reflected the tendency for deregulated markets to generate inequality and polarisation: these features are also inscribed in the spaces of global cities. Global cities focus and amplify the tensions and contradictions within the contemporary international system, and become key strategic sites for struggles over social justice and the character of political life in the twenty-first century. Global Cities and Global Order demonstrates the significance of the re-emergence of cities from the long shadow of the nation-state is far-reaching. Only by examining the mechanisms by which cities have become empowered in the last few decades can we understand their new functions and capabilities in global politics.
Global studies is a fresh and dynamic discipline area that promises to reinvigorate undergraduate and postgraduate education in the social sciences and humanities. In the Australian context, the interdisciplinary pedagogy that defines global studies is gaining wider acceptance as a coherent and necessary approach to the study of global change. Through the Global Studies Consortium (GSC), this new discipline is forming around an impressive body of international scholars who define their expertise in global terms. The GSC paves the way for the expansion of global studies programs internationally and for the development of teaching and research collaboration on a global scale.

Mark Juergensmeyer and Helmut Anheier’s forthcoming Encyclopaedia of Global Studies with SAGE is evidence of this growing international collaboration, while the work of Professor Manfred Steger exemplifies the flourishing academic literature on globalization. RMIT University’s Global Cities Institute represents a substantial institutional investment in interdisciplinary research into the social and environmental implications of globalization in which it leads the way internationally. Given these developments, the time is right for a book series that draws together diverse scholarship in global studies.

This Handbook allows for extended treatment of critical issues that are of major interest to researchers and students in this emerging field. The topics covered speak to an interdisciplinary approach to the study of global issues that reaches well beyond the confines of international relations and political science to encompass sociology, anthropology, history, media and cultural studies, economics and governance, environmental sustainability, international law and criminal justice. Specially commissioned chapters explore diverse subjects from a global vantage point and all deliberately cohere around core “global” concerns of narrative, praxis, space and place. This integrated approach sets the Handbook apart from its competitors and distinguishes Global Studies as the most equipped academic discipline with which to address the scope and pace of global change in the 21st century.
Are established economic, social and political practices capable of dealing with the combined crises of climate change and the global economic system? Will falling back on the wisdoms that contributed to the crisis help us to find ways forward or simply reconfigure risk in another guise? This volume argues that the combination of global environmental change and global economic restructuring require a re-thinking of the priorities, processes and underlying values that shape contemporary development aspirations and policy.

This volume brings together leading scholars to address these questions from several disciplinary perspectives: environmental sociology, human geography, international development, systems thinking, political sciences, philosophy, economics and policy/management science. The book is divided into four sections that examine contemporary development discourses and practices. It bridges geographical and disciplinary divides and includes chapters on innovative governance that confront unsustainable economic and environmental relations in both developing and developed contexts. It emphasises the ways in which dominant development paths have necessarily forced a separation of individuals from nature, but also from society and even from ‘self’. These three levels of alienation each form a thread that runs through the book. There are different levels and opportunities for a transition towards resilience, raising questions surrounding identity, governance and ecological management. This places resilience at the heart of the contemporary crisis of capitalism, and speaks to the relationship between the increasingly global forms of economic development and the difficulties in framing solutions to the environmental problems that carbon-based development brings in its wake.. Existing social science can help in not only identifying the challenges but also potential pathways for making change locally and in wider political, economic and cultural systems, but it must do so by identifying transitions out of carbon dependency and the kind of political challenges they imply for reflexive individuals and alternative community approaches to human security and wellbeing.

Climate Change and the Crisis of Capitalism contains contributions from leading scholars to produce a rich and cohesive set of arguments, from a range of theoretical and empirical viewpoints. It analyses the problem of resilience under existing circumstances, but also goes beyond this to seek ways in which resilience can provide a better pathway and template for a more sustainable future. This volume will be of interest to both undergraduate and postgraduate students studying Human Geography, Environmental Policy, and Politics.

So much to read, so little time? This brief overview of The World Is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-First Century tells you what you need to know—before or after you read Thomas L. Friedman ’s book.

Crafted and edited with care, Worth Books set the standard for quality and give you the tools you need to be a well-informed reader. 
 
This short summary and analysis of The World Is Flat 3.0 by Thomas L. Friedman includes: Historical contextChapter-by-chapter summariesDetailed timeline of important eventsImportant quotesFascinating triviaSupporting material to enhance your understanding of the original work 
About The World Is Flat 3.0 by Thomas L. Friedman:
 
Pulitzer Prize–winning author Thomas L. Friedman imagines himself a modern-day Columbus, exploring a new world created by a global economy. He travels from Bangalore to Bentonville, interviewing key figures in the rise of globalization, outsourcing, offshoring, and supply chain management.
 
Like great explorers before him, Friedman spins tales of vast wealth and freedoms made possible by advances in technology. But here, too, there be dragons: foreign competition, educational failures, governmental incompetence, and the specter of 9/11 and terrorism are the ugly flip side of crowd-sourced technological wonders.
 
The World Is Flat is an essential work for anyone interested in the impact of globalization.
 
The summary and analysis in this ebook are intended to complement your reading experience and bring you closer to a great work of nonfiction.
This edited volume focuses on the intersection of time and globalization, as manifested across a variety of economic, political, cultural, and environmental contexts. Since David Harvey’s influential characterization of globalization as "time-space compression", ample research has looked at the spatial aspect of the phenomenon, yet few have focused on globalization’s temporal aspects. Meanwhile, other publications have analysed problems of speed, acceleration, and the commodification of time, but while it often serves as the implicit or explicit backdrop for these studies of time, globalization is not investigated as a problem or a question in its own right. In response, this volume develops these conversations to consider how time shapes globalization, and how globalization affects our experience of time.

The interplay between varying aspects of the human experiences of time and globalization requires the type of interdisciplinary approach that this volume takes. The contributors advance an understanding of global time(s) as an arena of contestation, with social, political, ecological, and cultural implications for human and other lives. In considering the diverse valences of time and globalization, they illuminate problems as well as possibilities. Topics covered include emerging infectious diseases, temporal sovereignty, worker exploitation and resistance, chronobiology, energy politics, activism and hope, and literary and cinematic representations of counter-temporalities, offering a rich and varied account of global times.

This volume will be of great interest to students and researchers from a range of disciplines, including anthropology, cultural studies, globalization, international relations, literary studies, political science, social theory, and sociology.

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