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This is the first book to present field studies on the application of subject-oriented business process management (S-BPM). Each case presents a specific story and focuses on an essential modeling or implementation issue, and most end with implications or suggestions for further studies. Significant variables and success factors are identified that were discovered during the respective study and lead to suggesting S-BPM novelties. For each case, the authors explain step-by-step how the story develops, and provide readers guidance by detailing the respective rationale.

The studies covered are clustered according to three main S-BPM themes: Part I “Business Operation Support” documents approaches to the practical development of S-BPM solutions in various application domains and organizational settings, while Part II “Consultancy and Education Support” highlights cases that can help to train readers in S-BPM modeling and knowledge acquisition for S-BPM lifecycle iterations. It also refers to architecting S-BPM solutions for application cases based on hands-on experience. Part III “Technical Execution Support” focuses on concepts for utilizing specific theories and technologies to execute S-BPM models. It also addresses how to create reference models for certain settings in the field. Lastly, the appendix covers all relevant aspects needed to grasp S-BPM modeling and apply it based on fundamental examples. Its format reconciles semantic precision with syntactic rigor.>Addressing the needs of developers, educators and practitioners, this book will help companies to learn from the experiences of first-time users and to develop systems that fit their business processes, explaining the latest key methodological and technological S-BPM developments in the fields of training, research and application.

This book provides the most complete formal specification of the semantics of the Business Process Model and Notation 2.0 standard (BPMN) available to date, in a style that is easily understandable for a wide range of readers – not only for experts in formal methods, but e.g. also for developers of modeling tools, software architects, or graduate students specializing in business process management.

BPMN – issued by the Object Management Group – is a widely used standard for business process modeling. However, major drawbacks of BPMN include its limited support for organizational modeling, its only implicit expression of modalities, and its lack of integrated user interaction and data modeling. Further, in many cases the syntactical and, in particular, semantic definitions of BPMN are inaccurate, incomplete or inconsistent. The book addresses concrete issues concerning the execution semantics of business processes and provides a formal definition of BPMN process diagrams, which can serve as a sound basis for further extensions, i.e., in the form of horizontal refinements of the core language.

To this end, the Abstract State Machine (ASMs) method is used to formalize the semantics of BPMN. ASMs have demonstrated their value in various domains, e.g. specifying the semantics of programming or modeling languages, verifying the specification of the Java Virtual Machine, or formalizing the ITIL change management process.

This kind of improvement promotes more consistency in the interpretation of comprehensive models, as well as real exchangeability of models between different tools. In the outlook at the end of the book, the authors conclude with proposing extensions that address actor modeling (including an intuitive way to denote permissions and obligations), integration of user-centric views, a refined communication concept, and data integration.

An enterprise architecture tries to describe and control an organisation’s structure, processes, applications, systems and techniques in an integrated way. The unambiguous specification and description of components and their relationships in such an architecture requires a coherent architecture modelling language.

Lankhorst and his co-authors present such an enterprise modelling language that captures the complexity of architectural domains and their relations and allows the construction of integrated enterprise architecture models. They provide architects with concrete instruments that improve their architectural practice. As this is not enough, they additionally present techniques and heuristics for communicating with all relevant stakeholders about these architectures. Since an architecture model is useful not only for providing insight into the current or future situation but can also be used to evaluate the transition from ‘as-is’ to ‘to-be’, the authors also describe analysis methods for assessing both the qualitative impact of changes to an architecture and the quantitative aspects of architectures, such as performance and cost issues.

The modelling language presented has been proven in practice in many real-life case studies and has been adopted by The Open Group as an international standard. So this book is an ideal companion for enterprise IT or business architects in industry as well as for computer or management science students studying the field of enterprise architecture.

How can we optimize differentiating business processes and exploit their full potential? Here Volker Stiehl provides answers, utilizing the various options that the BPMN (Business Process Model and Notation) standard offers for planning, implementing and monitoring processes.

The book presents an approach for implementing an architecture for applications that strives to find a balance between development and maintenance costs, sustainability, scalability and fault tolerance; that meets flexibility requirements without becoming inordinately complex itself; and that keeps the end application as abstract as possible from the system landscape in which it operates. Based on the semantic enhancements found in version 2.0 of the BPMN standard, which have made it possible to execute process models, his approach exploits BPMN to create and run complete application architectures. In this context, BPMN is not just used to model the business processes of the application, as the “B” in BPMN might suggest; but also to model and execute the integration processes between the systems. Throughout the book, the software package SAP Process Orchestration is used to illustrate the implementation of the proposed architecture, yet all recommendations are intentionally kept generic so that they can be implemented on any other comparable platform as well.

Software architects, IT managers, software developers and project managers, as well as students of information and business technology will find the book a valuable resource. The proposed application architecture offers them a detailed blueprint, the principles of which they can use to plan and implement process-driven distributed applications.

Business process management (BPM) constitutes one of the most exciting - search areas in computer science and the BPM Conference together with its workshops provides a distinct platform for presenting the latest research and showing future directions in this area. These proceedings contain the ?nal v- sions of papers accepted for the workshops held in conjunction with the 7th International Conference on Business Process Management (BPM 2009). The BPM 2009 conference and workshops took place in Ulm, Germany. We received many interesting workshop proposals, eight of which were selected. Ultimately the workshops ran on September 7, 2009 featuring highly interesting keynotes, inspiring scienti?c presentations, and fruitful discussions. The history of ?ve years of BPM workshops in a row proves the continued success of the workshop program. Theworkshopsheldin2009includedonenewworkshoponempiricalresearch in business process management and seven well-established workshops. First International Workshop on Empirical Research in Business Process Management(ER-BPM 2009). The ER-BPM 2009 workshop addressed the demand for empirical research methods such as experimental or case studies to BPM and invited fellow colleagues to investigate both the potential and the limitations of BPM methods and technologies in practice. The ER-BPM workshop aimed at closing the gap in knowledge on process management and at discussing empirical research in the space of BPM and associated phenomena. 12th International Workshop on Reference Modeling (RefMod 2009). Although conceptual models have proven to be a useful means to support information systems engineering in the past few years, creating and especiallymaintainingconceptualmodelscanbequitechallengingandcostly.
Business applications are designed using profound knowledge about the business domain, such as domain objects, fundamental domain-related principles, and domain patterns. Nonetheless, the pattern community's ideas for software engineering have not impacted at the application level, they are still mostly used for technical problems.

This book takes exactly this step: it shows you how to apply the pattern ideas in business applications and presents more than 20 structural and behavioral business patterns that use the REA (resources, events, agents) pattern as a common backbone. If you are a developer working on business frameworks, you can use the patterns presented to derive the right abstractions (e.g., business objects) and to design and ensure that the meta-rules (e.g., process patterns) are followed by the developers of the actual applications. And if you are an application developer, you can use these patterns to design your business application, to ensure that it does not violate the domain rules, and to adapt the application to changing requirements without the need to change the overall architecture. As with patterns in general, this approach allows for both more flexible and more solid software architectures and hence better software quality.

"It's a great book, marvelous in breadth and depth. An impressive achievement. I particularly liked the modeling handbook examples." Bob Haugen, Business Technology Consultant and Contributor to REA standardization in ISO, UN/CEFACT and ebXML, UK

"I enjoyed reading it very much, it gave many new insights into REA and its applications." Paul Johannesson, Stockholm University and Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden

"This book by Pavel Hruby is destined to become a landmark in business modeling. Pavel heralds the replacement of traditional workflow-oriented modeling with a new breed of approaches that focus on delivering change-resilient and highly reusable business models. I highly recommend this book to you!" Krzysztof Czarnecki, University of Waterloo, Canada

This book covers the whole spectrum of modeling goals to achieve optimal quality in the process model developed. It focuses on how to balance quality considerations across all semiotic levels when models are used for different purposes, and is based on SEQUAL, a framework for understanding the quality of models and modeling languages, which can take into account all main aspects relating to the quality of models.

Chapter 1 focuses on the theoretical foundations, introducing readers to the topics of business processes and business process modeling, as well as the most important concept underlying the modeling of business processes. In turn, Chapter 2 addresses the quality of models in general and business process models in particular. Chapter 3 contains a specialization of SEQUAL for quality of business process models. In Chapter 4, examples of the practical uses of business process models are provided, together with the results of detailed case studies on how to achieve and maintain quality in business process models. Chapter 5 presents a process modeling value framework that demonstrates how to achieve more long-term and higher return on investment with regard to (business) process and enterprise models. Lastly, Chapter 6 reviews the main points of the book and discusses the potential for business process modeling in the future through its combination with other types of modeling.

The book has two intended audiences. It is primarily intended for computer science, software engineering and information system students at the postgraduate level who want to know more about business process modeling and the quality of models in preparation for professional practice. The second audience consists of professionals with extensive experience in and responsibilities related to the development and evolution of process-oriented information systems and information systems methodologies in general, who need to formalize and structure their practical experience or update their knowledge as a way to improve their professional activity. The book also includes a number of real-world case studies that make it easier to grasp the main theoretical concepts, helping readers apply the approaches described.

This book starts with an introduction to process modeling and process paradigms, then explains how to query and analyze process models, and how to analyze the process execution data. In this way, readers receive a comprehensive overview of what is needed to identify, understand and improve business processes.The book chiefly focuses on concepts, techniques and methods. It covers a large body of knowledge on process analytics – including process data querying, analysis, matching and correlating process data and models – to help practitioners and researchers understand the underlying concepts, problems, methods, tools and techniques involved in modern process analytics. Following an introduction to basic business process and process analytics concepts, it describes the state of the art in this area before examining different analytics techniques in detail. In this regard, the book covers analytics over different levels of process abstractions, from process execution data and methods for linking and correlating process execution data, to inferring process models, querying process execution data and process models, and scalable process data analytics methods. In addition, it provides a review of commercial process analytics tools and their practical applications.
The book is intended for a broad readership interested in business process management and process analytics. It provides researchers with an introduction to these fields by comprehensively classifying the current state of research, by describing in-depth techniques and methods, and by highlighting future research directions. Lecturers will find a wealth of material to choose from for a variety of courses, ranging from undergraduate courses in business process management to graduate courses in business process analytics. Lastly, it offers professionals a reference guide to the state of the art in commercial tools and techniques, complemented by many real-world use case scenarios.

Does the implementation of Microsoft DynamicsTM contribute to the goals of your company? Does your company itself have the capacity to build a bridge between the Business and IT? Can your employees adopt a flexible attitude on all the related changes ? And, probably even more important, is that what they are also willing to do? If you are striving for a full-hearted yes to these questions, this is the book for you.

Regatta Dynamics, our methodology for the structured implementation of Microsoft DynamicsTM, is based on our firm belief that when you implement Microsoft DynamicsTM there must be a balance between the Business and IT. The consistency and cohesion between the different underlying work streams are hereby of overriding importance for the ultimate result.

In this book, we answer the questions mentioned above and describe pragmatically the full implementation process from A to Z. Emphasis is placed on the organizational component of the implementation process and the cohesion with functional and technical processes. In our opinion, by involving the organization properly during the change process, your company can benefit much more and much faster from Microsoft DynamicsTM. Next to being a blueprint for the implementation complexity, this book can also be used as a guideline for daily practice.

This book is therefore interesting for project - and line managers, key-users, IT-managers and implementation consultants.

The authors are both working in the field of implementation. While writing this book they have drawn from their many years of experience in this field within Sogeti Netherlands. Wherever possible the authors have tried to change every challenge from unmanageable to comprehensive and, based on clearly separated sequences, the pluriform reality of implementation has been reduced to acceptable proportions that can be planned and managed. Main goal to achieve is to continuously create a tangible and remarkably better result for organizations who are considering implementing Microsoft DynamicsTM.

This book is the first volume of a running series under the title International Handbooks on Information Systems. The series is edited by Peter Bemus, Jacek Blazewicz, Giinter Schmidt and Mike Shaw. One objective is to give state of the art surveys on selected topics of information systems theory and applications. To this end, a distinguished international group of academics and practitioners are invited to provide a reference source not only for prob lem solvers in business, industry, and government but also for professional researchers and graduate students. It seemed appropriate to start the series with a volume covering some basic aspects about information systems. The focus of the first volume is therefore architectures. It was decided to have a balanced number of con tributions from academia and practitioners. The structure of the material follows a differentiation betweeen modelling languages, tools and method ologies. These are collected into separate parts, allowing the reader of the handbook a better comparison of the contributions. Information systems are a major component of the entire enterprise and the reader will notice that many contributions could just as easily have been included in another volume of the series which is on enterprise integration. Conversely, some traditionally information systems topics, as organisational analysis and strategic change management methods, will be treated in more depth in the Handbook on Enterprise Integration. The two volumes will complement each other.
This book presents a comprehensive and systematic introduction to transforming process-oriented data into information about the underlying business process, which is essential for all kinds of decision-making. To that end, the authors develop step-by-step models and analytical tools for obtaining high-quality data structured in such a way that complex analytical tools can be applied. The main emphasis is on process mining and data mining techniques and the combination of these methods for process-oriented data.

After a general introduction to the business intelligence (BI) process and its constituent tasks in chapter 1, chapter 2 discusses different approaches to modeling in BI applications. Chapter 3 is an overview and provides details of data provisioning, including a section on big data. Chapter 4 tackles data description, visualization, and reporting. Chapter 5 introduces data mining techniques for cross-sectional data. Different techniques for the analysis of temporal data are then detailed in Chapter 6. Subsequently, chapter 7 explains techniques for the analysis of process data, followed by the introduction of analysis techniques for multiple BI perspectives in chapter 8. The book closes with a summary and discussion in chapter 9. Throughout the book, (mostly open source) tools are recommended, described and applied; a more detailed survey on tools can be found in the appendix, and a detailed code for the solutions together with instructions on how to install the software used can be found on the accompanying website. Also, all concepts presented are illustrated and selected examples and exercises are provided.

The book is suitable for graduate students in computer science, and the dedicated website with examples and solutions makes the book ideal as a textbook for a first course in business intelligence in computer science or business information systems. Additionally, practitioners and industrial developers who are interested in the concepts behind business intelligence will benefit from the clear explanations and many examples.
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