More featuring humor

Get ready for the read of your life. Never before has a single book combined awesome vans, unicorns, Billy Joel, and erotic fiction in such a potent combination. A writing tour de force? Perhaps. A reading experience that will sear itself into your consciousness like a red-hot branding iron? Without question.

Comedian and basic cable superstar Michael Ian Black unleashes the full fury of his astonishing intellect in this collection of short comic essays. My Custom Van is a no-holds-barred assault to the funny bone that will literally beat you into submission with hilarity*.

How did he do it? How did he create such a fine anthology? Answer: With love. Michael opened his heart and used the magical power of love to write more than fifty thought-provoking essays like, "Why I Used a Day-Glo Magic Marker to Color My Dick Yellow," and "An Open Letter to the Hair Stylist Who Somehow Convinced Me to Get a Perm When I Was in Sixth Grade."

Maybe you think love is not a substitute for "good writing skills" and "spell check." Bull pucky! When it comes to writing books, love is the most powerful word processor of all.

Sounds pretty great, right? And yet...something is still holding you back from paying the full purchase price of this book. What is it? Perhaps you secretly believe you do not deserve a book this good. Nonsense -- you deserve this book and so much more. In fact, if Michael could have written you all the stars in the sky, that's what he would have done. But he couldn't do that, due to his lack of knowledge in the area of astronomy. So he wrote this book instead.

And this flap copy.

Enjoy.

* Michael Ian Black is not responsible for any actual injuries caused by reading this book.
Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex, But Never Knew to Ask
Did you know that in Middle-Eastern Islamic countries it is not only a sin but also a crime to eat a lamb that you've had sex with? Or that the world vanilla comes from a Latin word meaning "vagina" because of the vanilla pod's resemblance to the female genitalia? Or that Grand Tetons literally means "big tits"?
You've probably never even thought about such things. But here they are, in this unusual compilation of strange facts about the facts of life that will make you laugh out loud while your hair stands on end. Highlights include:
* Just the Factoids, Man -- For instance, the number of human ova necessary to repopulate the world could fit into a chicken egg.
* When Sex Goes Horribly Awry -- Don't be caught with your pants down. Learn once and for all the words you didn't find on your SATs, such as "acrotomophilia," "oculolinctus," and "taphephilia."
* Animal Lust -- There is more to sex in the animal kingdom than doing it doggie style. Did you know that a barnacle's penis is 150 percent of its body length?
* They Said What?! -- They said plenty: "I knew her before she was a virgin." (Oscar Levant on Doris Day)
* Sex Styles of the Rich and Famous -- Forget Bill and Monica. Adolf Hitler was a coprophiliac.
* Sex in History -- Catherine the Great did not die under a horse, but she did love to have her feet tickled and her bottom slapped.
* Around the World -- It's good to know, for the next time you're invited to the dinner party of a North-African Siwa man, that he believes you will find him irresistible if he laces your food with his semen.
* Crimes of Passion -- Did you know that in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, it is illegal to have sex with a truck driver in a tollbooth?
Wonderfully outrageous and absolutely deadpan, this book is, unbelievably, all true.
Written for people who have a song in their heart and a heart in their chest, Dancing to My Life's Soundtrack contains more than 2,500 jokes and one-liners that offers readers one way to trip the light fantastic and keep time to it, too. Theme music for the ages. From conception to death and everything of any note in between.

Willidau has risen above the scales of lounge lizard to compile the soundtrack of his life to put to music what mere words could never say. Ken Willidaus philosophy is that if you cant say whats in your heart and on your mind you should put it into the lyrics of songs that people will be repeating before long to make it look like they, too, are someone who is dancing along in life staying composed, themselves. Willidau orchestrates his story into a symphony of sound to set the mood for the moods that have rocked his world to his soul, in a compilation of a lifetime. And youll be toe-tapping along with it in no time caught up in it by the catchiness of it all.

Chapters band together a life that strings along a musical story of high and lows of all the right and wrong notes. Among them, Future Boy, Mother, Isolation, Human Behaviour, Remember and Into the Light make for a festival of sound that is a once-in-a-lifetime performance. This record of life is tracked with a maestro of jokes using wit, dark humour, one-liner hit wonders, tongue-in-cheek, twisted logic and double entendre humour. Spending your day with Ken will put a song in your head that will drive you as crazy as the thoughts its replacing that are always there hitting all the sour notes just making you sound flat, yourself.

Dancing To My Life's Soundtrack is a perfect read for those times when you want to make a concerted effort to play something different and not keep singing the same old song, yourself. And, a one and a two.

LOTSA LAUGHS is a book of jokes and hilarious observations, which Ben Sheldon had recorded in his note books, over several years. Its a very funny collection of mostly one- or two-liners. Each one of them was original or independently conceived at the time of recording and dating in the authors note books.

References to real known personalities are not necessarily true, but is done in parody, within protected free speech on satire.

There are seven sections to the book, labeled Chapters, in the Index. Each chapter is aimed at the reader who would enjoy predominantly that kind of humor. For instance, one may laugh at the unique observations in politics, but pass on to another friend or family member some funny aspects of different faiths or innocent, lighthearted takeoffs on ethnicity. A prudish reader may want to save the chapter on bedroom humor for an unblushing neighbor. In any case, said bedroom chapter is written in good taste, with no pornography.

The eclectic, broad-minded reader will, of course, enjoy all the levels of humor in this unique joke book, Lotsa Laughs.

For those who love the creative use of words in different unexpected contexts, there is a chapter on Tongue Twisters. Another chapter is about Fun with Words.

All the humor in Lotsa Laughs is innocent and harmless fun at ourselves and our social, political and religious mores. It is meant to laugh WITH and NOT AT the subjects of humor.

Lotsa Laughs would also make a good reference book for speakers seeking an attention-getting funny opening remark for their speech. A future Henny Youngman may find the one-liners in Lotsa Laughs a good fit for their training manual.

The rules change at 50! The New York Times–bestselling author and former SNL writer offers advice on living this stage of life with your dignity intact.
 
If you or someone you know has just turned fifty, it’s time to accept that the rules of life have changed, and that fifty is not the new thirty for most of us. Leland Gregory understands the forgetful minds, sagging bodies, and flagging pride of his fellow middle-agers, and in 50 Things Not to Do after 50, he offers helpful—and hilarious—advice for combating the humiliations this stage of life can bring.
 
In this lighthearted and sometimes painfully on-target book, you’ll learn that what we used to do in our twenties, thirties, and forties should be avoided at all costs from now on. For example, regardless of gender, under no circumstances should you ever . . .
 Attempt to wear leather pantsStart a story that involves a lot of names—you’ll forget most of them before the story is overStalk your high school sweetheart on Facebook; the person you had the hots for in 10th grade probably isn’t so hot anymoreGet drunk in Pamplona and decide to run with the bullsVolunteer to be a drug muleSay things like “fo’shizzle,” “whatev,” or “cray-cray”. . . And do we really need to mention thongs, Speedos, or jeggings? 
Leland Gregory, the New York Times–bestselling author of Stupid American History and America’s Dumbest Criminals, has been praised by Katie Couric as the “chronicler of Stupid America.”
*Now a Netflix Original Series*

In the satirical tradition of the New York Times bestseller Stuff White People Like comes this witty companion book to the “incredibly entertaining” (Indiewire) film of the same name, which “heralds a fresh and funny new voice” (Variety).

Right out of college, Justin Simien wrote a screenplay about the nuanced experiences of four black students on a predominantly white college campus. The film, Dear White People, garnered a Sundance Award for “Breakthrough Talent” and has been hailed by critics everywhere. Channeling the sensibility of the film into this book, Simien will keep you laughing with his humorous observations, even if you haven’t seen the satiric film.

News Flash—the minimum number of black friends needed to not seem racist has just been raised to two. Rather than panic, readers are advised to purchase a copy of Dear White People. Whether you are a dear white person wondering why your black office mate is avoiding eye contact with you after you ran your fingers through her hair, or you’re a black nerd who has to break it to your white friends that you’ve never seen The Wire, this myth-busting, stereotype-diffusing guide to a post-Obama world has something for you!

With decision-making trees to help you decide when it’s the right time to wear Blackface (hint: probably never) and quizzes to determine whether you’ve become the Token Black Friend™, Dear White People is the ultimate silly-yet-authoritative handbook to help the curious and confused navigate racial microaggressions in their daily lives.

Based on the eponymous, award-winning film, which has been lauded as “a smart, hilarious satire,” this tongue-in-cheek guide is a must-have that anybody who is in semi-regular contact with black people can’t afford to miss!
What can you do when the world is pushing you over the edge? More than you think.

For some of us, it's the automated voice that answers the phone when we'd rather talk to a real person. For others, it's the fact that Starbucks insists on calling its smallest-sized coffee "tall." Or perhaps it's those pesky subscription cards that fall out of magazines. Whatever it is, each of us finds some aspect of everyday life to be particularly maddening, and we often long to lash out at these stubborn irritants of modern life.

In Life's Little Annoyances, Ian Urbina chronicles the lengths to which some people will go when they have endured their pet peeves long enough and are not going to take it any more. It is a compendium of human inventiveness, by turns juvenile and petty, but in other ways inspired and deeply satisfying. We meet the junk-mail recipient who sends back unwanted "business reply" envelopes weighted down with sheet metal, so the mailers will have to pay the postage. We commiserate with the woman who was fed up with the colleague who kept helping himself to her lunch cookies, so she replaced them with dog biscuits that looked like biscotti. And we revel in the seemingly endless number of tactics people use to vent their anger at telemarketers, loud cellphone talkers, spammers, and others who impose themselves on us.

A celebration of the endless variety of passive aggressive behavior, Life's Little Annoyances will provide comfort and inspiration to everyone who has ever gritted his teeth and dreamed of sweet retribution against the slings and arrows of outrageous people.

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