More featuring satire

This meticulously edited collection is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents: Jeeves & Wooster Series Novels Right Ho, Jeeves Short Stories Leave It to Jeeves Jeeves and the Unbidden Guest Jeeves and the Hard-boiled Egg Absent Treatment Helping Freddie Rallying Round Old George Doing Clarence a Bit of Good The Aunt and the Sluggard Jeeves Takes Charge Jeeves in the Springtime Aunt Agatha Takes the Count Scoring off Jeeves Sir Roderick Comes to Lunch Jeeves and the Chump Cyril Comrade Bingo The Great Sermon Handicap The Purity of the Turf The Metropolitan Touch The Delayed Exit of Claude and Eustace Bingo and the Little Woman Jeeves and the Unbidden Guest Jeeves and the Hard-boiled Egg Bertie Changes His Mind Psmith Series Mike Mike and Psmith Psmith in the City The Prince and Betty Psmith, Journalist Other Novels The Pothunters A Prefect's Uncle The Gold Bat The Head of Kay's Love Among the Chickens The White Feather Not George Washington The Swoop! The Intrusion of Jimmy The Little Nugget Something New Uneasy Money Piccadilly Jim A Damsel in Distress The Coming of Bill Indiscretions of Archie The Little Warrior Three Men and a Maid The Adventures of Sally The Girl on the Boat Short Story Collections Tales of St. Austin's The Clicking of Cuthbert The Man with Two Left Feet Other Short Stories The Politeness of Princes Shields' and the Cricket Cup An International Affair The Guardian A Corner in Lines The Autograph Hunters Pillingshot, Detective When Papa Swore in Hindustani Tom, Dick, and Harry Disentangling Old Duggie Poems Damon and Pythias: A Romance The Haunted Tram Articles Some Aspects of Game-captaincy An Unfinished Collection The New Advertising The Secret Pleasures of Reginald My Battle With Drink In Defense of Astigmatism Photographers and Me A Plea for Indoor Golf The Alarming Spread of Poetry My Life as a Dramatic Critic
Musaicum Books presents to you this unique collection, designed and formatted to the highest digital standards and adjusted for readability on all devices. Jeeves & Wooster Series Novels Right Ho, Jeeves Short Stories Leave It to Jeeves Jeeves and the Unbidden Guest Jeeves and the Hard-boiled Egg Absent Treatment Helping Freddie Rallying Round Old George Doing Clarence a Bit of Good The Aunt and the Sluggard Jeeves Takes Charge Jeeves in the Springtime Aunt Agatha Takes the Count Scoring off Jeeves Sir Roderick Comes to Lunch Jeeves and the Chump Cyril Comrade Bingo The Great Sermon Handicap The Purity of the Turf The Metropolitan Touch The Delayed Exit of Claude and Eustace Bingo and the Little Woman Jeeves and the Unbidden Guest Jeeves and the Hard-boiled Egg Bertie Changes His Mind Psmith Series Mike Mike and Psmith Psmith in the City The Prince and Betty Psmith, Journalist Other Novels The Pothunters A Prefect's Uncle The Gold Bat The Head of Kay's Love Among the Chickens The White Feather Not George Washington The Swoop! The Intrusion of Jimmy The Little Nugget Something New Uneasy Money Piccadilly Jim A Damsel in Distress The Coming of Bill Indiscretions of Archie The Little Warrior Three Men and a Maid The Adventures of Sally The Girl on the Boat Short Story Collections Tales of St. Austin's The Clicking of Cuthbert The Man with Two Left Feet Other Short Stories The Politeness of Princes Shields' and the Cricket Cup An International Affair The Guardian A Corner in Lines The Autograph Hunters Pillingshot, Detective When Papa Swore in Hindustani Tom, Dick, and Harry Disentangling Old Duggie Poems Damon and Pythias: A Romance The Haunted Tram Articles Some Aspects of Game-captaincy An Unfinished Collection The New Advertising The Secret Pleasures of Reginald My Battle With Drink In Defense of Astigmatism Photographers and Me A Plea for Indoor Golf The Alarming Spread of Poetry My Life as a Dramatic Critic
This eBook has been formatted to the highest digital standards and adjusted for readability on all devices. Jeeves & Wooster Series follows the adventures of Bertram "Bertie" Wilberforce Wooster, a wealthy and idle young Londoner, and his highly competent valet Reginald Jeeves. A young English gentleman and one of the "idle rich", Bertie frequently appears alongside his valet, Jeeves, whose intelligence manages to save Bertie or one of his friends from numerous awkward situations. As the first-person narrator of ten novels and over 30 short stories, Bertie Wooster ranks as one of the most vivid comic creations in popular literature. Jeeves presents the ideal image of the gentleman, being highly competent, dignified, and respectful. Incredibly knowledgeable about topics ranging from horse racing to history, Jeeves has an encyclopedic knowledge of literature and academic subjects. He frequently quotes from Shakespeare and the romantic poets. Well informed about members of the British aristocracy thanks to the club book of the Junior Ganymede Club, he also seems to have a considerable number of useful connections among various servants. Jeeves uses his knowledge and connections to solve problems inconspicuously. Jeeves & Wooster Series: Right Ho, Jeeves Leave It to Jeeves Jeeves and the Unbidden Guest Jeeves and the Hard-boiled Egg Absent Treatment Helping Freddie Rallying Round Old George Doing Clarence a Bit of Good The Aunt and the Sluggard Jeeves Takes Charge Jeeves in the Springtime Aunt Agatha Takes the Count Scoring off Jeeves Sir Roderick Comes to Lunch Jeeves and the Chump Cyril Comrade Bingo The Great Sermon Handicap The Purity of the Turf The Metropolitan Touch The Delayed Exit of Claude and Eustace Bingo and the Little Woman Jeeves and the Unbidden Guest Jeeves and the Hard-boiled Egg Bertie Changes His Mind
In this hysterical follow-up to the New York Times bestseller White Girl Problems, Babe Walker travels the globe as she tries to figure out the answer to the question foremost on everyone's mind—including hers: Who is Babe Walker?

If you’re one of the hundreds of thousands who devoured Babe Walker’s New York Times bestselling novel White Girl Problems or one of the million people who read her blog or follow her on Twitter daily, then you’ve obviously been waiting with bated breath for her hilarious follow-up novel, Psychos.

Fresh from a four-month stint in rehab for her “alleged” shopping addiction, Babe Walker returns home to Bel Air ten pounds lighter (thanks to a stomach virus), having made amends (she told a counselor with bad skin she was smart) and confronted her past (after meeting her birth mother for the first time—a fashion model turned farmer lesbian). Although delighted to be home and determined to maintain her hard-won inner peace, Babe now faces a host of outside forces seemingly intent on derailing her path to positive change. Not only is she being trailed by an anonymous stalker, but she’s also reunited with the love of her life, a relationship that she cannot seem to stop self-sabotaging.

Babe’s newfound spirituality, coupled with her faith in the universe and its messages, leads her all over the world: shoulder dancing in Paris, tripping out in Amsterdam, and hooking up in the Mediterranean, only to land her back in New York City, forced to choose between a man who is perfect in every way (except for one small detail) and a man who could be The One if only he didn’t drive Babe to utter insanity.

Unapologetic and uproarious, Psychos is the send-up of the season—already as timeless as vintage Dior.
 Posie Victoria Vandermark charges forth from her mansion
in Possum Trot, her new Jaguar racing her into lost corners of high prairie
that surround the forlorn little town. 
She is wild as the prairie wind, spoiled, and eccentric.  Her one stubborn determination is to become a
ballerina, although her size and awkwardness make this more than doubtful.  To force things her way Posie hires an ageing
Italian ballet dancer whose career is over and who sees that the rich Posie
could be his retirement pension.  This is
his plot forward.



 



Coaxing Posie's delusion on is her nemesis, the cruel
Aunt Bertha Flatbottom.  She in turn
falls madly in love with the 'Dancing Master.' 



 



 Along the way
Posie's quest for dancing recruit others. 
In fact Aunt Bertha schemes to produce a public recital for Posie that
should surely make her utterly ridiculous and an object of scorn



 



Meanwhile Posie is running amok through Possum Trot in
her increasingly ragged tutu and slippers, giving performances to the Church,
the Gas Station and the pool hall.



 



Her recital is as expected the most unusual ever
held.  And following it is a cataclysmic
dance of Posie's own across the vast and empty Prairie.



 



Author Bio: Jonathan Wesley Bell has written several
novels and short stories.  He sometimes
forgets and carries his cell phone in his shoe.



 



keywords: Ballet, Ribald, Romp, Deceit, Love, Hatred,
Madness, Wealth, Prairie, Town



 



“A ribald romp of a novel that is an irreverent and
hilarious satire on human desires and self-deceptions.”



                                                                                                                                ~
Possum Trot Gazette



 

"Contrary to popular belief, you can beat the system." So says Lionel Goldfish, once hailed as "the Simenon of Success; the Asimov of Achievement," the octogenarian narrator of this extraordinarily funny novel by Denison Andrews. Disturbed by current trends in American society, Lionel Goldfish has come out of retirement to write his fiftieth and final success book. He has chosen the old formula of the success biography, the story of a shoeshine boy who made good. But all resemblance to Horatio Alger quickly disappears when we discover that the shoeshine boy, Rene Benet, is thirty-seven years old and one of the least honorable characters in recent fiction. Surprisingly, his story, told over many shines, causes Goldfish to repent his lifetime's labor. The story of Rene Benet, the man who beat the system, opens with one dazzling day in 1969 when our hero, driven by chronic lechery and a pathological aversion to work, loses career, marriage, and all pretense of respectability and goes off with a voluptuous hitchiker to a rock concert in Woodstock, New York. So begins a series of outrageous adventures where the monstrous world he comes to inhabit is filled with so many seedy, scheming characters that even he becomes a Pinocchio-like innocent in contrast. Our hero finally finds himself inside The System itself where he comes face to face, and duels with, its Boss. His spectacular escape gives the aged narrator, Lionel Goldfish, and all his readers the answer: how to beat the system. Denison Andrews takes on marriage, divorce, academia, the counter-culture, the rich, the poor, the middle class, Harvard, Santa Claus, drugs, the "ethical" drug industry, feminists, and anti-feminists with ripping humor. Above all, HOW TO BEAT THE SYSTEM lambastes our basic values of hard work and success. From the Silent Generation of Rene Benet to the adolescent cultural revolution of the late sixties, the author has a great deal to say about values, about ideals gained and ideals lost, and about what has happened to the "greening of America."
If you’ve ever dreamed of making it in music, then "Making Noises" is your novel.

“Euan Mitchell, author of the independent bestseller 'Feral Tracks', knows his rock’n’roll … and this laid-back, ironic take on the Australian music industry in the ’90s captures the spirit of the time. It’s fast-paced and grungy, full of backroom intrigue and colourful characters.”
The Age

“Loved it. I felt I knew almost all the seedy, manipulative, gold-digging music biz characters – but fortunately only on a two-faced, air-kiss kind of basis … Funny, astute, honest.”
Rob Hirst, Midnight Oil

“In the same way that 'Spinal Tap' is not a fiction, neither is 'Making Noises'. The stuff in both stories really does happen.”
John Archer, Hunters & Collectors

“Euan Mitchell does a nice line in laid-back prose.”
Sydney Morning Herald

*****

Marty is a rock musician on the wrong side of thirty who needs to change his tastes in music, women and cities. Billy is fifteen, talented and in prison.

The two are thrown together by the fast-talking former politician, Perce "Perk" Harrigan, whose powerful friends have handed him the plum job of launching the Oz Rock Foundation. Oz Rock uses taxpayer dollars to promote hip bands and quietly lift the Prime Minister’s youth vote.

Harrigan and his sultry but fascist assistant, Ingrid, need to ‘spin’ Oz Rock into orbit despite the cynics. They enlist Marty’s help to manipulate Billy to the top of the music charts. But their greatest enemy may not be the one publicly calling for Harrigan’s head.

A biting, hilarious literary satire of war, business, and contemporary masculinity, set in the cutthroat-but-ridiculous world of management consulting

King of the Mississippi is an incisive, uproarious dissection of contemporary male vanity and delusion, centered around a "war" for dominance of a prestigious Houston consulting firm. On one side of the conflict is Brock Wharton, an old money ex-jock whose delight in telling clients to downsize is matched only by his firm conviction that people like himself deserve to run the world. On the other is Mike Fink, a newly hired wily former soldier trying to ride his veteran status to the top of a corporate world that lionizes "the troops" without truly understanding them. Brock and Mike are mortal enemies on sight, bitterly divided not only by background and class but by diametrically opposed (yet equally delusional) visions of what it means to "be a man." And as their escalating conflict spirals out of control, it will take them all the way from the hidebound boardrooms and gladiatorial football fields of Texas to the vapid and self-serving upper echelon of Silicon Valley, to the corporatized battlefield of Iraq, all the while serving as a ruthlessly funny takedown of the vacuity and empty machismo of corporate life and alpha-male culture in modern America.

Devastatingly witty, unapologetically scathing, and ultimately surprisingly moving, King of the Mississippi marks the arrival of a unique and scintillating new voice in American fiction, one that boldly punctures the myths of American manhood like no one has since the heyday of The Bonfire of the Vanities and American Psycho.
This carefully crafted ebook: "Another Man's Wife And A Husband Under The Bed" is formatted for your eReader with a functional and detailed table of contents. Another Man's Wife and a Husband under the Bed is a humorous short story by Fyodor Dostoyevsky. The novella looks like a cliché of the vaudeville genre. The theme of the love triangle (or rather the polygon, given the number of heroin's lovers), the ridiculous and pathetic adulterer husbands (always much older than their wives), the idea that a young wife is necessarily lying, fickle and unfaithful, many misunderstandings which lead to situations, but also plenty of dialogues, improbabilities and unexpected twists of all sorts give this sketch a look of a "theater of the boulevard". Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1821-1881) was a Russian novelist, short story writer, essayist, journalist and philosopher. His literary works explore human psychology in the troubled political, social, and spiritual atmosphere of 19th-century Russia. Many of his works contain a strong emphasis on Christianity, and its message of absolute love, forgiveness and charity, explored within the realm of the individual, confronted with all of life's hardships and beauty. His major works include Crime and Punishment (1866), The Idiot (1869), Demons (1872) and The Brothers Karamazov (1880). Many literary critics rate him as one of the greatest and most prominent psychologists in world literature. His novella Notes from Underground is considered to be one of the first works of existentialist literature.
An “absurdly amusing” (The New York Times Book Review) sequel to Martha Grimes’s bestselling novel, Foul Matter, this wicked satire of the publishing industry is “comic, caustic, and relentlessly readable” (Booklist).

Writer Cindy Sella is having trouble with her new novel. Aside from her paralyzing writer’s block, she’s faced with a lawsuit from her ex-agent, L. Bass Hess. Hess will stop at nothing to collect a commission from Cindy on her previous novel, which he did not represent since she had fired him long before it was published.

Hitmen Candy and Karl—first introduced in Foul Matter—are asked to “get rid” of L. Bass Hess. They join forces with a publishing mogul, a bestselling author, an out-of-work Vegas magician, an alligator wrangler, a glamorous Malaysian con lady, and Hess’s aunt in the Everglades who has undergone a wildly successful sex change, and concoct a plan to save Cindy Sella from the odious machinations of Hess by driving him (slowly, hilariously) crazy.

Grimes’s fans will delight in the return of several colorful characters from Foul Matter, including Senior Editor Clive Esterhaus, unprincipled publisher Bobby Mackenzie, and ex-mobster and author Danny Zito, currently under the witness protection program. New readers will find that these characters and their escapades shed an amusing light on the New York publishing scene. Informed and influenced by the author’s own publishing adventures, “The Way of All Fish is a goofily offbeat delight” (The Washington Post).
The novel that began as a radio hoax, Theodore Sturgeon’s I, Libertine is a hilarious erotic romp through the royal boudoirs of eighteenth-century London
Inspired by a notorious radio hoax in the mid-1950s, popular radio host and prankster Jean Shepherd exhorted his faithful listeners to approach their local booksellers the next morning and request copies of the historical novel I, Libertine by Frederick R. Ewing—a book that had never been written, by an author who had never been alive. The hoax was so successful that I, Libertine became the talk of the town, even earning the unique distinction of being banned by the Archdiocese of Boston, despite the fact that it didn’t yet exist. Now there was nothing left to do but write the thing . . . and fantasy and science fiction legend Theodore Sturgeon was called in to work his magic. Originally written pseudonymously, Sturgeon’s I, Libertine is a glorious tale of close shaves, daring escapes, and wildly licentious behavior. It covers the bawdy misdeeds of Captain Lance Courtenay as he carelessly romps through the royal court and the bedchambers of London’s finest ladies. Chock-full of wicked wit and Sturgeon’s trademark twists and turns, it is a hilarious, picaresque adventure that Ewing himself would certainly have been proud to call his own, if he had existed. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Theodore Sturgeon including rare images and never-before-seen documents from the University of Kansas’s Kenneth Spencer Research Library and the author’s estate, among other sources.
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