More related to history of the Middle East

Armed with stones, Kalashnikovs, and the scarcely believable martyrdom of the suicide bomber, a generation of Palestinians has confronted one of the most lethal armies in the Middle East in a battle that has stunned and horrified the world. For almost two decades the Intifada has been the byword for Palestinian resistance to Israeli occupation. But, for all its familiar usage in the media, many people remain unclear as to what the Intifada really is, or how it began. Just what fuels the anger? Who are the key players in this deadly clash and where, during these dangerous days in the Middle East, does the resistance go from here? Part reflection, part reportage, in The Long Day Of Rage award-winning foreign correspondent and film-maker David Pratt, takes the reader on a journey across the frontlines of the Palestinian uprising.

From the War of the Stones in the 1980s, to the eruption of the al-Aqsa Intifada in 2000, and the ultimate rise of Hamas, this is an eyewitness tour through the Islamic hotbeds, beleaguered refugee camps, and bomb-makers’ dens of the West Bank and Gaza Strip. Above all, it is a gripping and graphic account of a people's struggle to shake off oppression as viewed from the ground zero of besieged Ramallah and the ruins of a shell-shattered Jenin.

About the author:
David Pratt has been a foreign correspondent and photojournalist specialising in the Middle East, Arab and Islamic world for more than twenty years. He has worked for Reuters, the Institute for War and Peace Reporting (IWPR), and is a regular contributor to the BBC on conflict and foreign affairs issues. During an adventurous career, Pratt has covered wars across the Middle East and Africa, including Israel/Palestine, Iraq, Congo, Sudan and Somalia, and has twice been a finalist in the Amnesty International Media Awards for his reporting on human rights issues. In Afghanistan in 1989 he had the dubious pleasure of having tea and a chat with Osama bin Laden during a lull in fighting around the city of Jalalabad. David Pratt is currently the Foreign Editor of the Sunday Herald.
Recent advances in cognitive linguistics provide new avenues for reading and interpreting Biblical Hebrew prophetic text. This volume utilises a multi-layered cognitive linguistics approach to explore Jeremiah 1:1-6:30, incorporating insights from cognitive grammar, cognitive science and conceptual blending theory. While the modern reader is separated from the originators of these texts by time, space and culture, this analysis rests on the theory that both the originators and the modern reader share common features of embodied experience. This opens the way for utilising cognitive models, conceptual metaphor and mental spaces theory when reading and interpreting ancient texts.
This volume provides an introduction to cognitive theory and method. Initially, short examples from Jeremiah 1:1-6:30 are used to introduce the theory and method. This is followed by a detailed comparison of traditional and cognitive approaches to Biblical Hebrew grammar. These insights are then applied to further examples taken from Jeremiah 1:1-6:30 in order to test and refine the approach. These findings show that Jeremiah 1:1-1:3 establishes perspective for the text as a whole and that subsequent shifts in perspective may be tracked using aspects of mental spaces theory. Much of the textual content yields to concepts derived from conceptual metaphor studies and from conceptual blending theory, which are introduced and explained using examples taken from Jeremiah 1:1-6:30.
The entire analysis demonstrates some of the strengths and weaknesses of using recent cognitive theories and methods for analysing and interpreting ancient texts. While such theories and methods do not obviate the need for traditional interpretive methods, they do provide a more nuanced understanding of the ancient text.
The Arab Spring, the continuing Israel - Palestine conflict... why does the Middle East dominate the news headlines so often?One obvious answer is oil, the lifeblood of our modern world. The crucial importance of oil alone ensures that the Middle East will remain in the headlines for years.

The Middle East is also the birthplace of the world's three great monotheistic religions—Judaism, Christianity and Islam. It has also been the battlefield for each religion—trying to control the territory they consider holy.

Nowhere are these conflicts more obvious than in Israel, and specifically in Jerusalem.

Whether you understand it or not, events in the Middle East are destined to affect the lives of every person on earth! Bible prophecy gives us the clues to understand what will happen.

This ebook, "The Middle East in Bible Prophecy", will help you better understand the troubled history of the Middle East—and its tumultuous future.


Chapters in this ebook:
-- Introduction: Worlds in Turmoil
-- The Middle East: Worlds in Collision
-- The Sons of Abraham
-- The Rise and Fall of Ancient Israel
-- The Four Empires of Daniel's Prophecies
-- The Coming of Islam
-- The Jews: From the Dispersion to the Modern Israeli State
-- The Creation of the Modern Middle East
-- A Rising Tide of Arab Nationalism
-- Fundamentalist Islam Resurges
-- Anger Mounts Following Gulf War
-- Not Enemies Forever
-- "Why Do People Hate Us So Much?"
-- War and Peace in the Middle East
-- What Is the "Abomination of Desolation"?
-- Prophecy of an Arab Confederation
-- What Should You Do?


Inside this Bible Study Aid ebook:

"It’s impossible to understand the present Middle East without a knowledge of the three great religions that emanate from the area—Judaism, Christianity and Islam. These three faiths all trace their spiritual roots back to the same individual, Abraham."

"However, conflict between Christians and Muslims has been a constant theme of history for 14 centuries."

"Many other factors have contributed to the rise of Islamic fundamentalism and subsequent terrorism, including the Israeli-Palestinian problem and the domination of American culture."

"After so much death and destruction, and centuries of war and unrest in the Middle East, imagine what a difference the second coming of Jesus Christ will make."
Drawing on a newly developed theoretical definition of “missed opportunity,” Chances for Peace uses extensive sources in English, Hebrew, and Arabic to systematically measure the potentiality levels of opportunity across some ninety years of attempted negotiations in the Arab-Israeli conflict. With enlightening revelations that defy conventional wisdom, this study provides a balanced account of the most significant attempts to forge peace, initiated by the world’s superpowers, the Arabs (including the Palestinians), and Israel. From Arab-Zionist negotiations at the end of World War I to the subsequent partition, the aftermath of the 1967 War and the Sadat Initiative, and numerous agreements throughout the 1980s and 1990s, concluding with the Annapolis Conference in 2007 and the Abu Mazen-Olmert talks in 2008, pioneering scholar Elie Podeh uses empirical criteria and diverse secondary sources to assess the protagonists’ roles at more than two dozen key junctures.

A resource that brings together historiography, political science, and the practice of peace negotiation, Podeh’s insightful exploration also showcases opportunities that were not missed. Three agreements in particular (Israeli-Egyptian, 1979; Israeli-Lebanese, 1983; and Israeli-Jordanian, 1994) illuminate important variables for forging new paths to successful negotiation. By applying his framework to a broad range of power brokers and time periods, Podeh also sheds light on numerous incidents that contradict official narratives. This unique approach is poised to reshape the realm of conflict resolution.

Surveying the population and revenue of six Palestinian cities—Jerusalem, Hebron, Gaza, Ramie, Nabulus, and Safed—in the sixteenth-century, Amnon Cohen and Bernard Lewis consider the numbers, composition, and distribution of the Muslim, Christian, and Jewish population, and discuss the different headings of revenue, the manner of assessment and collection, the yield, and the destination of the money collected. This monograph traces these developments, in detail, over an extended period and for a significant area of the Ottoman Empire.

Based on the Tapu registers in Istanbul and Ankara, this book provides to the academic world a collection and analysis of documents previously unavailable and unreadable except to a very small number of people. Translations and annotations of these texts illuminate and explain the terms and institutions found in Ottoman surveys of population and taxation. Professors Cohen and Lewis establish the fact that in the cities of Palestine, population and revenue showed a rather spectacular parallel development towards the middle of the sixteenth-century when the disruptive conditions of the conquest had disappeared and Ottoman administration had been well established. Then, in the latter half of the century, they find a recession again.

Originally published in 1978.

The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

My Struggle for Peace is a remarkable political document offering insights into the complex workings of the young Israeli political system, set against the backdrop of the disintegration of the country’s fragile armistice with the Arab states. Replete with the diarist’s candid comments on Israel’s first generation leaders and world statesmen of the day, the diary also tells the dramatic human story of a political career cut short—the removal of an unusually sensitive, dedicated, and talented public servant. My Struggle for Peace is, above all, an intimate record of the decline of Moshe Sharett’s moderate approach and the rise of more "activist-militant" trends in Israeli society, culminating in the Suez/Sinai war of 1956. The diary challenges the popular narrative that Israel’s confrontation with its neighbors was unavoidable by offering daily evidence of Sharett’s statesmanship, moderation, diplomacy, and concern for Israel’s place in international affairs.

This is the third volume in the long-awaited 3-volume English abridgement of Sharett’s Yoman Ishi [Personal diary] (Ma’ariv, 1978) maintains the integrity, flavor, and impact of the 8-volume Hebrew original and includes additional documentary material that was not accessible at the time. The volumes are also available to purchase as a set or individually.

3-volume set (1953-1956): http://www.iupress.indiana.edu/product_info.php?products_id=809721

Volume 1 (1953-1954): http://www.iupress.indiana.edu/product_info.php?products_id=809283

Volume 2 (1955): http://www.iupress.indiana.edu/product_info.php?products_id=809455

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