More related to otorhinolaryngology

Contemporary laryngology had its beginnings near the close of the 19th century and is probably best exemplified in the work of Morel McKenzie and of Czermak. Subsequent to their pioneering efforts, another surge of interest could be said to have centered about the efforts of the Chevalier Jacksons in the 1920's. After those bold steps, and for almost 40 years, research in laryngology and interest in laryngology continued, but at considerably and increasingly less intense levels, certainly so far as the otolaryngologist population was concerned. In the 1940's Julius Lempert sparked a renaissance in otologic research, deVelopment, and surgery, and exciting new frontiers opened in otology. In our own time, otology remains a large basic and fundamental segment of the otolaryngologic purview, but the flood of new discoveries which followed Lempert, like those which had followed the Jacksons in the 1920's in laryngology, appears to have diminished. When the authors of this publication made acquaintance in the late 1960's, there were approximately 10 centers in the United States for laryngologic research which could be truly designated as voice research facilities. The senior author was at that time instrumental in formulating the major criteria for laboratories to be so designated. In the early 1980's interest in laryngology has revived. At a recent meeting it was possible to list over 40 such laboratories which now were known to the authors over a broad geographic sweep, covering the entire United States.
Laryngeal Physiology for the Surgeon and Clinician, Second Edition facilitates a sound understanding of the three principal functional priorities of the larynx: protection, respiration, and phonation. Working on the basis that a sound understanding of these functional priorities is essential to the management of the myriad diseases besetting this complex organ, Dr. Sasaki explores these three functional categories in terms of phylogeny, functional morphology, and neuromuscular reflexes. The book features numerous illustrations and tables and most chapters are preceded by focused case presentations introducing relevant clinical descriptions. Uniquely and invaluably, Sasaki has included original experimental data from the Yale Larynx Laboratory in order to support physiologic performance important to the understanding of clinical behavior.

The second edition systematically explores biomechanical measures of neurophysiologic events substantially augmenting relevance to clinical experience, while presenting newly recognized evidence of a functioning laryngeal motor plexus, an understanding potentially contributing to discoveries of physiologic compensatory behavior.

In Dr. Sasaki's own words, the book "does not contain all the answers to challenges encountered in clinical practice, nor will its perusal endow the reader with the necessary capability to justify new operative procedures or rehabilitation strategies. While it does present a selective point of view, it does not intend to exclude competing perspectives generated by systematic inquiry. Rather, it is meant to serve as a guide for the serious trainee and as a reference manual for those discerning Head and Neck Surgeons, Speech Language Pathologists, Anesthesiologists and Deglutologists who would seek to extend the boundaries of our knowledge in laryngeal physiology."

Almost all of Dr. Sasaki's career has been dedicated to stretching those boundaries himself, and the extent to which he has succeeded is reflected in his standing in the community, through the numerous awards he and his laboratory have attained, and through the content of this second edition: an outstanding contribution to the laryngology literature. 

 Scary Cases in Otolaryngology follows a case-based approach that focuses on potential pitfalls, decision analysis, mistakes, and "near misses" in the management of patients with head and neck disorders. This is an invaluable resource for otolaryngologists as it presents difficult cases and builds a discussion around clinical management, prevention, and the legal and ethical aspects of those cases. Current and future professionals in otolaryngology can analyze their own methodologies as well as the work of their peers to continually promote a safer and healthier environment for their patients.

Scary Cases in Otolaryngology is an extension of the annual Scary Cases Conference held by the Boston University School of Medicine. The conference began in 2011 and aims to improve patient safety by addressing complex and controversial cases that involve increased risk, complications, and unfavorable outcomes. The cases in the text have been selected from previous conference presentations.

This exciting and unique book addresses questions such as

Did you make a wrong diagnosis before arriving at the correct one?Do you believe that you did everything correctly and the outcome was still unsatisfactory?Did a patient have a serious condition that was difficult to diagnose?Were there major complications?Did you have a difficult ethical dilemma?Were you required to treat a condition beyond your expertise?


This innovative text includes clinical information on cases provided by faculty from top medical schools along with their narratives on what they learned. Contributors also include experts in medical malpractice and malpractice liability insurance. Practicing otolaryngologists, otolaryngology residents, malpractice attorneys, law students, otolaryngology nurse practitioners and primary care physicians will benefit from the examples in these "scary cases."

The information you didn't learn in medical school!A marvelous and amusing read...memorable anecdotes...I defy you not to laugh out loud. --ENT NewsWant to get a step up on the competition? This is the book for young doctors trying to bluff their way into erudite otolaryngological circles by giving the impression that their ENT education was not wasted. Knowledge of trivia about a particular subject always gives the impression that the holder of this useless information is also privy to other facts which are just too mundane to mention. While everyone in the field may know what Gradenigo's Syndrome is, you will impress your colleagues by knowing just who Gradenigo was! With Offbeat Otolaryngology, you'll also learn these valuable pearls of wisdom: Inspiring confidence in othersIt is not necessary to know Latin, but merely to give the strong impression that one has forgotten it.- The historical meaning of medical termsRhino, as any reader of Billy Butler will know, is an old term for money and many allege it is from this that the tem rhinoplasty derives.- Public health issuesDuring the late 1960's, the rate of coronary heart disease in Finland was very high and thought to be associated with the high milk intake which was found there, most Finns drink a pint or two of milk instead of beer with their evening meal. The Finnish government accordingly put a health warning on milk.- Other medical specialtiesResearch has shown that anesthetists were the chaps who at school had their mittens tied together through the arms of their duffel coat. Our psychiatric advisers tell us that this is a form of insecurity and, like most things in life (according to them) dates back to early childhood and the fear of rejection by or loss of their mother. As doctors, they fear losing the attention of their patient are not really happy unless he is anesthetized and will not run away.- And many more!Learn the fun facts and information you missed in medical school the magic and romance behind acoustic neuroma; madness and anesthesia; famous tracheotomies; the history of nasal polyps; and so much more. Finally, a medical book that makes you laugh! Offbeat Otolarngology is the book you will avidly read at every break, use in speeches, and amuse your friends and colleagues.John D C Bennett is an intensely shy and private individual who spends most of his time wondering why he has ended up where and what he is. He has taken to travelling the world researching obscure medical curiosities and unsung heroes. His mother is very worried.John Riddington Young is a ferret breeder, wood carver, arable farmer, and Punch & Judy man who grows prize winning sweet peas. His main hobbies are kite flying, cricket umpiring, otolaryngology and the Territorial Army. Like John Bennett, he is a Yorkshire chauvinist, but is presently doing missionary work in North Devon where he lives with a bull terrier, five children, and his wife, who has always been very worried.
Techniques on facial reconstruction are presented with videos demonstrating many of the procedures. Topics include: 3D imaging and modeling for treatment planning in facial trauma; Intraoperative Use of CT Imaging; Contemporary management of traumatic fractures of the frontal sinus; Surgical treatment of traumatic injuries of the cranial base; Surgical management of complex mid facial fractures; Current management of condylar and subcondylar fractures; Management of Pediatric mandible fractures; Management of dental injuries associated with maxillomandibular trauma; Injuries of the eye and periorbital structures; Managing the facial nerve after trauma; Reconstruction of the avulsed auricle after trauma; Secondary repair of acquired enophthalmos; Secondary management of telecanthus; Improving post traumatic facial scars; Potential application of Face transplantation in massive traumatic tissue loss; Potential application of autologous free tissue transfer in massive traumatic tissue loss. Guest Editors leading this publication are Kofi Boahene of Johns Hopkins, whose practice and teaching encompasses corrective surgery for congenital facial defects, cleft lip and palate repair, craniofacial surgery, minimally invasive and endoscopic skull base surgery, microsurgery, reconstruction of cancer patients and extensive post-traumatic deformities, among others and Anthony Brissett of Baylor University, whose research and teaching include craniofacial surgery and wound healing, among other reconstructive and cosmetic surgeries.
©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.