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Every teacher has his moments in which he or she feels exhausted, incapable of coping with the previous ability to persist with hard work in preparing classes, or, simply putting it, lazy.

Laziness isn’t necessarily a bad thing but merely a condition that is natural to all human beings. Lack of efficiency and irresponsibility, on the other hand, can lead to many negative outcomes, not only with impact on the students but also on the career of the teacher.

It was thinking about laziness with efficiency that this book was created, so that teachers may achieve their expectations, but also teach properly, while not spending more than 5 minutes to prepare such classes.

In this book, the author reflects and compiles his15 years of experience as a teacher and lecturer in Europe and Asia, with multiple and different subjects, and in levels ranging from primary school to college. And also a background of extensive investigations on the topic of learning disabilities with highly positive results, as well as experiences as director in training companies and consultant, among many others. These tips, resume his best, most efficient and fastest ways to prepare a class.

The strategies are described in an abstract and wide perspective so that they may easily be applied for any topic of study and levels of teaching. And while not intending to promote laziness, but in fact help teachers prepare good classes in a quick form, and with different approaches, this book was created so that the results regarding the quality of the teaching, in any case, can be maintained.

This collection of thirteen original essays by experts in the field of Caribbean studies clarifies the diverse elements that have shaped the modern Caribbean. Through an interdisciplinary examination of the complexities of race, politics, language, and environment that mark the region, the authors offer readers a thorough understanding of the Caribbean's history and culture. The essays also comment thoughtfully on the problems that confront the Caribbean in today's world.

The essays focus on the Caribbean island and the mainland enclaves of Belize and the Guianas. Topics examined include the Haitian Revolution of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries; labor and society in the nineteenth-century Caribbean; society and culture in the British and French West Indies since 1870; identity, race, and black power in Jamaica; the "February Revolution" of 1970 in Trinidad; contemporary Puerto Rico; politics, economy, and society in twentieth-century Cuba; Spanish Caribbean politics and nationalism in the nineteenth century; Caribbean migrations; economic history of the British Caribbean; international relations; and nationalism, nation, and ideology in the evolution of Caribbean literature.

The authors trace the historical roots of current Caribbean difficulties and analyze these problems in the light of economic, political, and social developments. Additionally, they explore these conditions in relation to United States interests and project what may lie ahead for the region. The challenges currently facing the Caribbean, note the editors, impose a heavy burden upon political leaders who must struggle "to eliminate the tensions when the people are so poor and their expectations so great."

The contributors are Herman L. Bennett, Bridget Brereton, David Geggus, Franklin W. Knight, Anthony P. Maingot, Jay R. Mandle, Roberto Marquez, Teresita Martinez Vergne, Colin A. Palmer, Bonham C. Richardson, Franciso A. Scarano, and Blanca G. Silvestrini.

Four years have passed since the first edition of this book. During this time I have had the opportunity to apply it in classes obtaining feedback from students and inspiration for improvements. I have also benefited from many comments by users of the book. For the present second edition large parts of the book have undergone major revision, although the basic concept – concise but sufficiently rigorous mathematical treatment with emphasis on computer applications to real datasets –, has been retained. The second edition improvements are as follows: • Inclusion of R as an application tool. As a matter of fact, R is a free software product which has nowadays reached a high level of maturity and is being increasingly used by many people as a statistical analysis tool. • Chapter 3 has an added section on bootstrap estimation methods, which have gained a large popularity in practical applications. • A revised explanation and treatment of tree classifiers in Chapter 6 with the inclusion of the QUEST approach. • Several improvements of Chapter 7 (regression), namely: details concerning the meaning and computation of multiple and partial correlation coefficients, with examples; a more thorough treatment and exemplification of the ridge regression topic; more attention dedicated to model evaluation. • Inclusion in the book CD of additional MATLAB functions as well as a set of R functions. • Extra examples and exercises have been added in several chapters. • The bibliography has been revised and new references added.
The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) is one of the best-known and active national organizations that represent Mexican Americans and their political interests. Since its founding in Corpus Christi, Texas, in 1929, it has served as a vehicle through which Mexican Americans can strive for equal rights and economic assimilation into Anglo American society.

This study is the first comprehensive political history of LULAC from its founding through the 1980s. Márquez explores the group’s evolution from an activist, grassroots organization in the pre– and post–World War II periods to its current status as an institutionalized bureaucracy that relies heavily on outside funding to further its politically conservative goals. His information is based in part on many primary source materials from the LULAC archives at the University of Texas at Austin, the Houston Public Library, and the University LULAC publications, as well as interviews with present and past LULAC activists.

Márquez places this history within the larger theoretical framework of incentive theory to show how changing, and sometimes declining, membership rewards have influenced people’s participation in LULAC and other interest groups over time. Ironically, as of 1988, LULAC could claim fewer than 5,000 dues-paying members, yet a dedicated and skillful leadership secured sufficient government and corporate monies to make LULAC one of the most visible and active groups in Mexican American politics.

Given the increasing number of interest groups and political action committees involved in national politics in the United States, this case study of a political organization’s evolution will be of interest to a wide audience in the political and social sciences, as well as to students of Mexican American and ethnic studies.

If we rely on logic of history of political and legal teachings, then this implies that this history began in Rus’ at the time when pagans were huddled into a river. This fact in itself is of little interest. What is of interest is the following: what is the essence of this fact?In his time, T. Mann expressed a thought that if humanity once again were put in pre-civilized conditions—the first thing it would do is create mythology. Mythology, as it is known, operates on images. In terms of survivability, there is nothing comparable to the degree of survival that an image has. This can be traced back through heraldry of many countries, including Russia. At the same time, as strange as this might seem at first glance, military authorities of all countries in the world today can be nominated for the palm of victory in the use of mythological images.

An image has a very large informational capacity and, at the same time, it is multifunctional, very convenient, and aimed directly at psyche of a person, who under the influence of imagery (mythology) carries out his physical actions only within the limits of the received image. Naturally, an image can be intended not only for an individual or a group, but also for social, ethnic influence. In the history of political and legal doctrines of Rus’ it is interesting to trace the work of the system of images from the point of view of justification for existence of monarchy, relations between monarchy and Christianity, monarchy and philosophy, ideology and politics, real and virtual worlds.

Politics, according to statements made by political scientists, as well as directly or indirectly related people, claim relation to art. If this is so, maybe it is worthwhile to consider politics alongside creative works of people of literature, poetry, painting?

We came back to that what was refused from the beginning. Thank God that myth turned out to have truly amazing survivability. From the time of rejection of myth to modernity, mythical symbol served as inspiration to many writers, poets, musicians, and artists. Dante, Shakespeare, Rabelais, A. Dürer, H. Bosch, E.T.A. Hoffmann, G. G. Byron, P. B. Shelley, M. Y. Lermontov, R. Wagner, F. Nietzsche, Joyce, T. Mann, C.G. Jung, S. Freud, V. Ivanov, F. Sologub, A. Borges, J. Amado, G. G. Márquez, and many, many others would likely have acceded to the opinion of Richard Wagner, who said that it is through myth that a nation becomes a creator of art, and that a myth is poetry of deep life views, which have a universal character. This becomes increasingly relevant in the emerging new world.
In this book, the authors cover the basic methods and advances within distance sampling that are most valuable to practitioners and in ecology more broadly. This is the fourth book dedicated to distance sampling. In the decade since the last book published, there have been a number of new developments. The intervening years have also shown which advances are of most use. This self-contained book covers topics from the previous publications, while also including recent developments in method, software and application.

Distance sampling refers to a suite of methods, including line and point transect sampling, in which animal density or abundance is estimated from a sample of distances to detected individuals. The book illustrates these methods through case studies; data sets and computer code are supplied to readers through the book’s accompanying website. Some of the case studies use the software Distance, while others use R code. The book is in three parts. The first part addresses basic methods, the design of surveys, distance sampling experiments, field methods and data issues. The second part develops a range of modelling approaches for distance sampling data. The third part describes variations in the basic method; discusses special issues that arise when sampling different taxa (songbirds, seabirds, cetaceans, primates, ungulates, butterflies, and plants); considers advances to deal with failures of the key assumptions; and provides a check-list for those conducting surveys.

Due to the dramatic growth of the Latino population in America, in combination with the relative decline of the Anglo (non-Hispanic white) share, Latino Studies is increasingly at the forefront of political concern. With Latino Politics: Identity, Mobilization, and Representation, editors Rodolfo Espino, David L. Leal, and Kenneth J. Meier bring together essays from a number of leading scholars to address the ever-more important issues within the field. Providing an overview of issues surrounding Latino identity and political opinion--such as differences among Latino groups based on national origin, the importance of descriptive representation, and issues of competition and cooperation, particularly with reference to African Americans--the editors speak to the many fundamental debates ingrained in the discipline.

In addition to highlighting important contributions of the study of Latino politics to date, this volume suggests areas that have yet to be explored and, perhaps more importantly, demonstrates how the study of Latino politics relates to broader questions of American politics and society. Foregrounding debates in the overall discipline of political science, the collection will appeal to those who study Latino politics as well as those who are interested in understanding American politics and society with reference to Latino and "minority" concerns.

Contributors:

Rodney E. Hero, University of Notre Dame * Benjamin Márquez, University of Wisconsin, Madison * David L. Leal, University of Texas at Austin * Michael Jones-Correa, Cornell University * Matt A. Barreto, University of Washington * Ricardo Ramírez, University of Southern California * Louis DeSipio, University of California, Irvine * Adrian D. Pantoja, Arizona State University * Sylvia Manzano, Texas A&M University * Helena Alves Rodrigues, University of Arizona * Gary M. Segura, University of Washington * René R. Rocha, University of Iowa * Luis Ricardo Fraga, University of Washington * Sharon A. Navarro, University of Texas at San Antonio * Rodolfo Espino, Arizona State University * Jason P. Casellas, University of Texas at Austin * Eric Gonzalez Juenke, University of Colorado at Boulder * Nick A. Theobald, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo * Valerie Martinez-Ebers, Texas Christian University * Manuel Avalos, Arizona State University * Kenneth J. Meier, Texas A&M University

The maxim “Primum non nocere” is almost as old as the practice of medicine. In combination with the principles of beneficence, autonomy and justice, and whilst keeping in mind the confidence and dignity of the patient, it should constitute the basis of our behaviours as physicians and nurses. Since diagnostic and therapeutic interventions have become more complex and their risk/benefit ratios more difficult to assess, the importance of safety and quality of care rises. Avoiding the infliction of harm on our patients has moved into the focus of clinical medicine. Patient safety is now viewed as a priority even by the Presidency of the European Union. Physicians in intensive care medicine deal with the most fragile and dependent human beings, often struggling with multiple co-morbid diseases and physiological derangements at the limits of survival. These patients are often reliant on numerous invasive technologies for their survival. Moreover, the almost universal need for multiple pharmacological interventions – combinations of which have often never been rigorously tested before – places the critically ill patients at a very high risk of being harmed by the physician’s interventions. More than 120 internationally known experts introduce their current knowledge of patient safety and quality of care in intensive care medicine in over 50 chapters covering the following fields: - Safety in intensive care medicine - Decision making - Culture and behaviour - Structure and processes - Protocolised medicine - First, do no harm - Safety during technical support - Training, teaching and education - Risk management - Ethical issues - Future approaches This book should be read by every manager who has responsibility for the acutely ill. It is an invaluable educational and reference tool for physicians and nurses in intensive care medicine and will help to improve the safety and overall care for critically ill patients. with contributions from: LM Aitken, R Alvisi, R Amerling, PJD Andrews, A Artigas, D De Backer, N Badjatia, M Bauer, G Bertolini, A Biasi Cavalcanti, JF Bion, BW Böttiger, CSC Bouman, A Boumendil, FA Bozza, J Braithwaite, G Brattebø, FM Brunkhorst, DDG Bugano, M Capuzzo, M Cecconi, W Chaboyer, J Chen, E Coiera, K Colpaert, CR Cooke, JR Curtis, BH Cuthbertson, AL Cuvello Neto, KJ Deans, J Decruyenaere, J-M Dominguez-Roldan, Y Donchin, C Druml, G Dubreuil, R Endacott, A Esteban, R Ferrer, H Flaatten, J Fragata, F Frutos-Vivar, C Garcia-Alfaro, M Garrouste-Orgeas, TD Girard, ARJ Girbes, J Graf, D Grimaldi, ABJ Groeneveld, B Guidet, U Günther, N Harbord, DA Harrison, C Hartog, N Heming, F Hernandez-Hazañas, K Hillman, P Holder, MH Hooper, M Imhoff, U Janssens, JM Kahn, E Knobel, M Knobel, J Lipman, T Lisboa, Y Livne, S Lorent, M Makdisse, A Marques, GD Martich, ML Martinez, SA Mayer, DK Menon, PC Minneci, J-P Mira, X Monnet, RP Moreno, T Muders, C Natanson, A Navas, G Ntoumenopoulos, SA Nurmohamed, HM Oudemans-van Straaten, R Paterson, O Peñuelas, JG Pereira, C Pierrakos, LF Poli-de-Figueiredo, CE Pompilio, D Poole, A Pronovost, C Putensen, K Reinhart, J Rello, A Rhodes, Z Ricci, C Richard, F Rincon, JA Roberts, E Roeb, C Ronco, GD Rubenfeld, D Salgado, JIF Salluh, G Satkurunath, A Schneider, C Schwebel, E Silva, M Singer, EGM Smit, M Soares, L Soufir, A Tabah, J-L Teboul, P Teschendorf, N Theuerkauf, J-F Timsit, M Ulldemolins, A Valentin, JM Varghese, J-L Vincent, B Volpe, CS Waldmann, RR West, S West, JF Winchester, H Wrigge
Excavations of Maya burial vaults at Palenque, Mexico, half a century ago revealed what was then the most extraordinary tomb finding of the pre-Columbian world; its discovery has been crucial to an understanding of the dynastic history and ideology of the ancient Maya. Over the years, new analytical tools introduced uncertainties regarding earlier interpretations of the findings, and a reanalysis of the remains of the ruler Janaab’ Pakal using contemporary methodologies has led to new interpretations of former accounts of his life and death.

This volume communicates the broad scope of applied interdisciplinary research conducted on the Pakal remains to provide answers to old disputes over the accuracy of both skeletal and epigraphic studies, along with new questions in the field of Maya dynastic research. Contributions by scholars in epigraphy, anthropology, and bioarchaeology bring to light new evidence regarding the ruler’s age, clarify his medical history and the identification of the remains found with him, reevaluate his role in life, and offer modern insights into ritual and sacrificial practices associated with Pakal.

The book leads readers through the history of Pakal’s discovery, skeletal analysis, and interpretation of Maya biographies, and also devotes considerable attention to the tomb of the “Red Queen” discovered at the site. Findings from the new Transition Analysis aging method, histomorphometric analysis, and taphonomic imagery are presented to shed new light on the perplexing question of Pakal’s age at death. Royal Maya life and death histories from the written record are also analyzed from a regional perspective to provide a broad panorama of the twisted power politics of rulers’ families and the entangled genealogies of the Maya Classic period.

A benchmark in biological anthropology, this volume reconsiders assumptions concerning the practices and lives of Maya rulers, posing the prospect that researchers too often find what they expect to find. In presenting an updated study of a well-known personage, it also offers innovative approaches to the biocultural and interdisciplinary re-creation of Maya dynastic history.

Contributors

Jesper K. Boldseh
Jane E. Buikstra
James H. Burton
Andrea Cucina
Nikolai Grube
Patricia Hernández
Lourdes Márquez
Simon Martin
George R. Milner
T. Douglas Price
Arturo Romano
Carlos Serrano
Sam D. Stout
Margaret Streeter
Vera Tiesler
John W. Verano
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