Top Free in Books

The King in Yellow

Robert William Chambers

The War of the Worlds

H.G. Wells
The chilling novel account of a Martian invasion of London in the nineteenth century—a science fiction classic for all time.

The War of the Worlds inspired the international bestseller The Map of the Sky by Félix J. Palma. As a gift to our readers, we are including an excerpt of The Map of the Sky in this eBook edition.

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

L. Frank Baum
In the first of L. Frank Baum's time-honored Oz novels, country girl Dorothy Gale gets whisked away by a cyclone to the fantastical Land of Oz. Dropped into the midst of trouble when her farmhouse crushes a tyrannical sorceress, Dorothy incurs the wrath of the Wicked Witch of the West. Dorothy is desperate to return to her native Kansas, and, aided by the Good Witch of the North, she sets out for the Emerald City to get help from the legendary Wizard. On her way, she meets three unlikely allies who embody key human virtues—the Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman, and the Cowardly Lion.

Pride and Prejudice

Jane Austen
Austen’s most celebrated novel tells the story of Elizabeth Bennet, a bright, lively young woman with four sisters, and a mother determined to marry them to wealthy men. At a party near the Bennets’ home in the English countryside, Elizabeth meets the wealthy, proud Fitzwilliam Darcy. Elizabeth initially finds Darcy haughty and intolerable, but circumstances continue to unite the pair. Mr. Darcy finds himself captivated by Elizabeth’s wit and candor, while her reservations about his character slowly vanish. The story is as much a social critique as it is a love story, and the prose crackles with Austen’s wry wit.

A Princess of Mars

Edgar Rice Burroughs

The prince

Niccolò Machiavelli

The Awakening

Kate Chopin
Edna Pontellier, a young married woman with two small children, gradually awakens -- to her individuality and sexuality -- and experiences love outside of her passionless marriage.

Einstein's Theories of Relativity and Gravitation

James Malcolm Bird
Einstein's theory of relativity confounded and excited both professional and amateur scientists with its explanation of the intricacies of how the world and the universe truly work, rather than how people wished or believed they worked. His view of relativity dismantled Newton's theory of space and time as absolutes, adding the concept of curved space-time, which deals with the velocity of motion. Einstein explains his theory of physics in a way that was designed not only for scientists with a knowledge of the complicated math involved but for the general reader as well.

Treasure Island

Robert Louis Stevenson
Treasure Island, published in 1883, popularized the now familiar characters of pirates and brought them to rum-swilling life. When an old sailor named Billy Bones dies in the inn belonging to young Jim Hawkins’s parents, he leaves a greasy old map on which an “X” marks the spot where treasure is buried. Jim joins the crew of a ship in pursuit of Bones’s treasure, and on the seas meets up with Long John Silver, a peg-legged pirate who has infiltrated their ranks. Jim must survive mutinies and counter-mutinies, face hand-to-hand combat with drunken sailors, and outwit double-crossing thieves before the treasure can be his.

The Three Musketeers

Alexandre Dumas
One of the preeminent novels by French writer Alexandre Dumas, this swashbuckling tale follows a group of honorable 17th-century swordsmen who must contend with powerful adversaries scheming against the queen. Determined to join the royal guard, young d'Artagnan leaves his country home and travels to Paris, where he unintentionally angers Aramis, Athos, and Porthos, the esteemed Three Musketeers. Eventually winning the trust and admiration of the formidable trio of fighters, d'Artagnan joins them in their quest to thwart the plans of the sinister Cardinal Richelieu.

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

Lewis Carroll
In the most renowned novel by English author Lewis Carroll, restless young Alice literally stumbles into adventure when she follows the hurried, time-obsessed White Rabbit down a hole and into a fantastical realm where animals are quite verbose, logic is in short supply, and royalty tends to be exceedingly unpleasant. Each playfully engaging chapter presents absurd scenarios involving an unforgettable cast of characters, including the grinning Cheshire Cat and the short-tempered Queen of Hearts, and every stop on Alice's peculiar journey is marked by sharp social satire and wondrously witty wordplay.

Wuthering Heights

Emily Bronte
Published in 1845, Emily Bronte’s gothic novel set on the windy moors of Yorkshire is the story of the doomed love between Catherine Earnshaw and her father’s adopted son, Heathcliff. The book was initially poorly received by many critics who found its dark, tragic story needlessly harsh and disturbing. That opinion has not endured, and the only novel Emily Bronte published is now considered to be one of the great classics of English literature.

Great Expectations

Charles Dickens
One of the finest novels by iconic British author Charles Dickens, this Victorian tale follows the good-natured orphan Pip as he makes his way through life. As a boy, Pip crosses paths with a convict named Magwitch, a man who will heavily influence Pip’s adulthood. Meanwhile, the earnest young man falls for the beautiful Estella, the adoptive daughter of the affluent and eccentric Miss Havisham. Widely considered to be Dickens's last great book, the story is steeped in romance and features the writer's familiar themes of crime, punishment, and societal struggle.

Frankenstein, or, The Modern Prometheus

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
Frankenstein was published in 1818, the work of a 21-year-old genius named Mary Shelley. Hundreds of movies, adaptations, and monster masks later, its reputation remains so lively that the title has become its own word in the English language. Victor Frankenstein, a scientist, discovers the secret of reanimating the dead. After he rejects his hideous creation, not even the farthest poles of the earth will keep his bitter monster from seeking an inhuman revenge. Inspired by a uniquely Romantic view of science’s possibilities, Shelley’s masterpiece ultimately wrestles with the hidden shadows of the human mind.

faust

goethe

Grimm's Fairy Tales

Edna Henry Lee Turpin

Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
Presenting 12 tales starring the legendary British detective Sherlock Holmes, this 1892 book is Arthur Conan Doyle's first short-story collection. The mystery compilation includes some of Holmes's finest cases with his dutiful sidekick, Doctor Watson, most notably "A Scandal in Bohemia," in which Holmes matches wits with the crafty former lover of a European king. Also featured is "The Adventure of the Red-Headed League," a study in misdirection that unfolds to become a much larger scheme. The stories, initially published in the Strand Magazine, are essential reading for Holmes fans.

Moby Dick

Herman Melville
A literary classic that wasn't recognized for its merits until decades after its publication, Herman Melville's Moby-Dick tells the tale of a whaling ship and its crew, who are carried progressively further out to sea by the fiery Captain Ahab. Obsessed with killing the massive whale, which had previously bitten off Ahab's leg, the seasoned seafarer steers his ship to confront the creature, while the rest of the shipmates, including the young narrator, Ishmael, and the harpoon expert, Queequeg, must contend with their increasingly dire journey. The book invariably lands on any short list of the greatest American novels.

The Secret Garden

Frances Hodgson Burnett
Since its publication in 1911, The Secret Garden, a touchstone of children’s literature, has been adapted for plays and movies over a dozen times. Charming generations of readers, the story centers around the healing power of friendship, and the magic in the everyday. Burnett begins with a spoiled and unsympathetic heroine named Mary Lennox. When Mary is orphaned, she is shipped from her home in colonial India to a drab country house in Yorkshire. As she learns to tend the garden on the estate, Mary forms her first true friendships; when they bring a secret garden back to life, Mary and her friends are also transformed.

The Jungle Book

Rudyard Kipling

The Tale of Peter Rabbit

Beatrix Potter

A Tale of Two Cities

Charles Dickens
"It was the best of times, it was the worst of times." Charles Dickens' classic novel tells the story of two Englishmen--degenerate lawyer Sydney Carton and aristocrat Charles Darnay--who fall in love with the same woman in the midst of the French Revolution's blood and terror. Originally published as 31 weekly instalments,A Tale of Two Cities has been adapted several times for film, serves as a rite of passage for many students, and is one of the most famous novels ever published.

This is a free digital copy of a book that has been carefully scanned by Google as part of a project to make the world's books discoverable online. To make this print edition available as an ebook, we have extracted the text using Optical Character Recognition (OCR) technology and submitted it to a review process to ensure its accuracy and legibility across different screen sizes and devices. Google is proud to partner with libraries to make this book available to readers everywhere.

Romeo and Juliet

William Shakespeare
Performed all over the world, and constantly adapted and reinterpreted in a variety of mediums, Shakespeare’s 1597 tale about the doomed “star-crossed lovers” from enemy families whose tumultuous affair ends in tragedy is one of his best known and most beloved plays. The story of the feuding Montague and Capulet families features the famous balcony scene where the lovers first realize their mutual affection, setting off a series of duels, secret plots, and misunderstandings that eventually leads to one of the most tragic death scenes in all of theater.

The Picture of Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde

The Life of Abraham Lincoln

Henry Ketcham

Bleak House

Charles Dickens
The law courts prevailing over the case of Jarndyce & Jarndyce are overwhelming in their pedantic, futile red-tape bureaucratic adherence to old principles and are partly based on Dickens' time as a young law clerk. With a massive cast of characters--many with ingeniously comic names--and his most complex plot, Bleak House is believed by many to be Dickens' greatest work.

This is a free digital copy of a book that has been carefully scanned by Google as part of a project to make the world's books discoverable online. To make this print edition available as an ebook, we have extracted the text using Optical Character Recognition (OCR) technology and submitted it to a review process to ensure its accuracy and legibility across different screen sizes and devices. Google is proud to partner with libraries to make this book available to readers everywhere.

White Fang

Jack London
When a teenage boy is torn from his friends and city surroundings by his family

Peter Pan and Wendy

J. M. Barrie

Call of the Wild

Jack London

Emma: A Novel

Jane Austen

The Origin of Species

Charles Darwin
First published in 1859, this landmark book on evolutionary biology was not the first to deal with the subject, but it went on to become a sensation—and a controversial one for many religious people who could not reconcile Darwin’s science with their faith. Darwin worked on the book for over 20 years before its publication. The radical crux of his scientific theory was the idea of natural selection, which meant that chance, not a divine Creator, played a great role in humanity's advancement and that individuals who weren't physically able to adapt with the greater populace died off.

Gulliver's Travels

Jonathan Swift
In Jonathan Swift's most celebrated book, surgeon Lemuel Gulliver takes to the open seas and winds up shipwrecked on the island kingdom of Lilliput. Gulliver is a giant to the tiny Lilliputians. They take him prisoner, but he eventually gains their trust and escapes. Gulliver's adventure continues when he journeys to the lands of the giant Brobdingnags, meets the aloof academics of the floating empire Laputa, confronts the aristocratic horses the Houyhnhnms, and grapples with the idiotic Yahoos. Swift's tale is an insightful political fantasy puncturing pretension, and it has charmed and befuddled generations of readers both young and old.

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

Mark Twain
The book that introduced the world to the iconic American characters of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn, this 1876 novel by Mark Twain follows the mischievous exploits of the two young boys, who find themselves in situations both humorous and dangerous. Never short of ways to stir up trouble in his hometown on the Mississippi River, Tom uses his wits to get both in and out of tight spots, often with Huck at his side. Featuring moments of significant social commentary, these interconnected tales essentially served as a dry run for Twain's notably weightier sequel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

The Importance of Being Earnest

Oscar Wilde
Subtitled “A Trivial Comedy for Serious People,” Wilde’s play is a brilliantly satirical comedy of manners, sending up the absurdity of Victorian social mores and cleverly critiquing the conventions of love and marriage. The tale of two gentlemen who adopt fictitious identities in order to woo the objects of their affections is Wilde’s most beloved work, considered to be one of the wittiest plays ever written in English. The glowing critical reception in London on opening night at the St. James Theater in 1895 marked the high point of Wilde’s career as a writer.

Anne of Green Gables: Volume 1, Issue 1

Lucy Maud Montgomery
Matthew Cuthbert, an elderly bachelor, and his spinster sister, Marilla, want to adopt a sturdy little boy to help with chores on their Prince Edward Island farm. The orphanage mistakenly sends a girl. Anne Shirley is a romantic, mischievous redhead desperate for a home and a family. She is also afflicted with an exhausting habit: she cannot stop talking. Her vivid imagination causes her to encounter one mishap after another. Loyal and kindhearted, however, Anne is soon accepted as a "kindred spirit" to Matthew and Marilla and grows up a spirited and intelligent young woman. Encouraged by her grade-school teacher, Miss Stacy, Anne enters Queen

Persuasion

Jane Austen

Jane Eyre

Charlotte Brontë
Bronte’s novel about a shy, quiet governess who becomes a tutor in a great house and falls in love with its lonely and mysterious master is one of the great classics of English literature. Unique in its attention to the thoughts and feelings of a female protagonist, Jane Eyre was ahead of its time as a proto-feminist text. When it was published in 1847, however, Bronte was attacked by critics for what they felt was anti-Christian sentiment in her unflinching critique of the oppressions of Victorian society.

A Little Princess: Being the Whole Story of Sara Crewe Now Told for the First Time

Frances Hodgson Burnett
Sara Crewe, a pupil at Miss Minchin's London school, is left in poverty when her father dies but is later rescued by a mysterious benefactor.

Sense and Sensibility

Jane Austen

A Tale of Two Cities

Charles Dickens
"It was the best of times, it was the worst of times." Charles Dickens' classic novel tells the story of two Englishmen--degenerate lawyer Sydney Carton and aristocrat Charles Darnay--who fall in love with the same woman in the midst of the French Revolution's blood and terror. Originally published as 31 weekly instalments, A Tale of Two Cities has been adapted several times for film, serves as a rite of passage for many students, and is one of the most famous novels ever published.

This is a free digital copy of a book that has been carefully scanned by Google as part of a project to make the world's books discoverable online. To make this print edition available as an ebook, we have extracted the text using Optical Character Recognition (OCR) technology and submitted it to a review process to ensure its accuracy and legibility across different screen sizes and devices. Google is proud to partner with libraries to make this book available to readers everywhere.

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea

Jules Verne
An adaptation of the nineteenth-century science fiction tale of an electric submarine, its eccentric captain, and the undersea world, which anticipated many of the scientific achievements of the twentieth century.

The Arabian Nights

George Fyler Townsend

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

Lewis Carroll
In the most renowned novel by English author Lewis Carroll, restless young Alice literally stumbles into adventure when she follows the hurried, time-obsessed White Rabbit down a hole and into a fantastical realm where animals are quite verbose, logic is in short supply, and royalty tends to be exceedingly unpleasant. Each playfully engaging chapter presents absurd scenarios involving an unforgettable cast of characters, including the grinning Cheshire Cat and the short-tempered Queen of Hearts, and every stop on Alice's peculiar journey is marked by sharp social satire and wondrously witty wordplay.

Through the Looking Glass: and What Alice Found There

Lewis Carroll
In this sequel to Alice in Wonderland, Alice goes through the mirror to find a strange world where curious adventures await her.

Just So Stories

Rudyard Kipling
Twelve stories about animals and insects including How the Camel Got His Hump; How the First Letter was Written, and How the Rhinoceros Got His Skin.

The Wind in the Willows

Kenneth Grahame

Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

Robert Louis Stevenson
In Robert Louis Stevenson's influential novel of mad science and criminal inquiry, attorney Gabriel John Utterson comes to the aid of Dr. Henry Jekyll, an old friend, only to find himself dragged from a world of genial hospitality into London's foreboding night, which is shrouded in shadows and fog—and stalked by the deranged Edward Hyde. Utterson's quest for truth is not only a detective story laden with twists, but an intense meditation on man's inherently dualistic nature, written in a style that often combines disturbing violence with restrained language typical of the Victorian era.