The Tale of Peter Rabbit

Beatrix Potter

A Tale of Two Cities

Charles Dickens
"It was the best of times, it was the worst of times." Charles Dickens' classic novel tells the story of two Englishmen--degenerate lawyer Sydney Carton and aristocrat Charles Darnay--who fall in love with the same woman in the midst of the French Revolution's blood and terror. Originally published as 31 weekly instalments,A Tale of Two Cities has been adapted several times for film, serves as a rite of passage for many students, and is one of the most famous novels ever published.

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Romeo and Juliet

William Shakespeare
Performed all over the world, and constantly adapted and reinterpreted in a variety of mediums, Shakespeare’s 1597 tale about the doomed “star-crossed lovers” from enemy families whose tumultuous affair ends in tragedy is one of his best known and most beloved plays. The story of the feuding Montague and Capulet families features the famous balcony scene where the lovers first realize their mutual affection, setting off a series of duels, secret plots, and misunderstandings that eventually leads to one of the most tragic death scenes in all of theater.

The Picture of Dorian Gray

Oscar Wilde

The Life of Abraham Lincoln

Henry Ketcham

Bleak House

Charles Dickens
The law courts prevailing over the case of Jarndyce & Jarndyce are overwhelming in their pedantic, futile red-tape bureaucratic adherence to old principles and are partly based on Dickens' time as a young law clerk. With a massive cast of characters--many with ingeniously comic names--and his most complex plot, Bleak House is believed by many to be Dickens' greatest work.

This is a free digital copy of a book that has been carefully scanned by Google as part of a project to make the world's books discoverable online. To make this print edition available as an ebook, we have extracted the text using Optical Character Recognition (OCR) technology and submitted it to a review process to ensure its accuracy and legibility across different screen sizes and devices. Google is proud to partner with libraries to make this book available to readers everywhere.

White Fang

Jack London
When a teenage boy is torn from his friends and city surroundings by his family

Peter Pan and Wendy

J. M. Barrie

Call of the Wild

Jack London

Emma: A Novel

Jane Austen

The Origin of Species

Charles Darwin
First published in 1859, this landmark book on evolutionary biology was not the first to deal with the subject, but it went on to become a sensation—and a controversial one for many religious people who could not reconcile Darwin’s science with their faith. Darwin worked on the book for over 20 years before its publication. The radical crux of his scientific theory was the idea of natural selection, which meant that chance, not a divine Creator, played a great role in humanity's advancement and that individuals who weren't physically able to adapt with the greater populace died off.

Gulliver's Travels

Jonathan Swift
In Jonathan Swift's most celebrated book, surgeon Lemuel Gulliver takes to the open seas and winds up shipwrecked on the island kingdom of Lilliput. Gulliver is a giant to the tiny Lilliputians. They take him prisoner, but he eventually gains their trust and escapes. Gulliver's adventure continues when he journeys to the lands of the giant Brobdingnags, meets the aloof academics of the floating empire Laputa, confronts the aristocratic horses the Houyhnhnms, and grapples with the idiotic Yahoos. Swift's tale is an insightful political fantasy puncturing pretension, and it has charmed and befuddled generations of readers both young and old.

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

Mark Twain
The book that introduced the world to the iconic American characters of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn, this 1876 novel by Mark Twain follows the mischievous exploits of the two young boys, who find themselves in situations both humorous and dangerous. Never short of ways to stir up trouble in his hometown on the Mississippi River, Tom uses his wits to get both in and out of tight spots, often with Huck at his side. Featuring moments of significant social commentary, these interconnected tales essentially served as a dry run for Twain's notably weightier sequel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

The Importance of Being Earnest

Oscar Wilde
Subtitled “A Trivial Comedy for Serious People,” Wilde’s play is a brilliantly satirical comedy of manners, sending up the absurdity of Victorian social mores and cleverly critiquing the conventions of love and marriage. The tale of two gentlemen who adopt fictitious identities in order to woo the objects of their affections is Wilde’s most beloved work, considered to be one of the wittiest plays ever written in English. The glowing critical reception in London on opening night at the St. James Theater in 1895 marked the high point of Wilde’s career as a writer.

Anne of Green Gables: Volume 1, Issue 1

Lucy Maud Montgomery
Matthew Cuthbert, an elderly bachelor, and his spinster sister, Marilla, want to adopt a sturdy little boy to help with chores on their Prince Edward Island farm. The orphanage mistakenly sends a girl. Anne Shirley is a romantic, mischievous redhead desperate for a home and a family. She is also afflicted with an exhausting habit: she cannot stop talking. Her vivid imagination causes her to encounter one mishap after another. Loyal and kindhearted, however, Anne is soon accepted as a "kindred spirit" to Matthew and Marilla and grows up a spirited and intelligent young woman. Encouraged by her grade-school teacher, Miss Stacy, Anne enters Queen

Persuasion

Jane Austen

Jane Eyre

Charlotte Brontë
Bronte’s novel about a shy, quiet governess who becomes a tutor in a great house and falls in love with its lonely and mysterious master is one of the great classics of English literature. Unique in its attention to the thoughts and feelings of a female protagonist, Jane Eyre was ahead of its time as a proto-feminist text. When it was published in 1847, however, Bronte was attacked by critics for what they felt was anti-Christian sentiment in her unflinching critique of the oppressions of Victorian society.

A Little Princess: Being the Whole Story of Sara Crewe Now Told for the First Time

Frances Hodgson Burnett
Sara Crewe, a pupil at Miss Minchin's London school, is left in poverty when her father dies but is later rescued by a mysterious benefactor.