Infectious disease

Concise and practical handbook for all those who have responsibility for the identification and control of infectious disease


Why Buy this Book?:


  • Clear and concise - combining science, attention to detail and a practical approach
  • Covers basic principles of communicable disease control and health protection, major syndromes, control of individual infections, main services and activities, organizational arragements for all EU countries and sources of further information
  • All chapters updated inline with recent changes in epidemiology, new guidelines for control and adminstrative changes
  • New or expanded chapters on immunization queries, smallpox, SARS, West Nile virus, delibrate release / bioterrorism and on-call response


"This comprehensive and practical handbook will provide a very accessible source of detailed information for everyone in the field of communicable disease control."
Sir Liam Donaldson, Chief Medical Officer (from the foreword)


"This handbook will be a valuable resource for all those who are interested in control of communicable disease, including public-health physicians, epidemiologists, infection control nurses, microbiologists and those training to work in these related fields."
The Lancet Infectious Diseases


"This book fulfils all the needs of a practical handbook, being easy to use and packed with practical information."
Epidemiology and Infection


"This would be the first book to reach for in any number of day-to-day or crisis situations in communicable disease control."
British Journal of Infection Control


"If you undertake on-call public health duties, just buy the book."
Journal of Public Health Medicine

Finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize | A New York Times Editor's Choice

“[A] grounded, bracingly intelligent study” —Nature


Prizewinning science journalist Sonia Shah presents a startling examination of the pandemics that have ravaged humanity—and shows us how history can prepare us to confront the most serious acute global health emergency of our time.

Over the past fifty years, more than three hundred infectious diseases have either emerged or reemerged, appearing in places where they’ve never before been seen. Years before the sudden arrival of COVID-19, ninety percent of epidemiologists predicted that one of them would cause a deadly pandemic sometime in the next two generations. It might be Ebola, avian flu, a drug-resistant superbug, or something completely new, like the novel virus the world is confronting today. While it was impossible to predict the emergence of SARS-CoV-2—and it remains impossible to predict which pathogen will cause the next global outbreak—by unraveling the stories of pandemics past we can begin to better understand our own future, and to prepare for what it holds in store.

In Pandemic: Tracking Contagions, from Cholera to Ebola and Beyond, Sonia Shah interweaves history, original reportage, and personal narrative to explore the origins of epidemics, drawing parallels between cholera—one of history’s most deadly and disruptive pandemic-causing pathogens—and the new diseases that stalk humankind today. She tracks each stage of cholera’s dramatic journey, from its emergence in the South Asian hinterlands as a harmless microbe to its rapid dispersal across the nineteenth-century world, all the way to its latest beachhead in Haiti. Along the way she reports on the pathogens now following in cholera’s footsteps, from the MRSA bacterium that besieges her own family to the never-before-seen killers coming out of China’s wet markets, the surgical wards of New Delhi, and the suburban backyards of the East Coast.

Delving into the convoluted science, strange politics, and checkered history of one of the world’s deadliest diseases, Pandemic is a work of epidemiological history like no other, with urgent lessons for our own time.

“Shah proves a disquieting Virgil, guiding us through the hells ruled by [infectious diseases] . . . the power of Shah's account lies in her ability to track simultaneously the multiple dimensions of the public-health crises we are facing.” —The Chicago Tribune
A gripping narrative about the origins and spread of the Zika virus by New York Times science reporter Donald G. McNeil Jr.

Until recently, Zika—once considered a mild disease—was hardly a cause for global panic. But as early as August 2015, doctors in northeast Brazil began to notice a trend: many mothers who had recently experienced symptoms of the Zika virus were giving birth to babies with microcephaly, a serious disorder characterized by unusually small heads and brain damage.

By early 2016, Zika was making headlines as evidence mounted—and eventually confirmed—that microcephaly is caused by the virus, which can be contracted through mosquito bites or sexually transmitted.

The first death on American soil, in February 2016, was confirmed in Puerto Rico in April. The first case of microcephaly in Puerto Rico was confirmed on May 13, 2016. The virus has been known to be transmitted by the Aedes aegypti or Yellow Fever mosquito, but now Aedes albopictus, the Asian Tiger mosquito, has been found to carry it as well, which means it might affect regions as far north as New England and the Great Lakes. Right now, at least 298 million people in the Americas live in areas “conducive to Zika transmission,” according to a recent study. Over the next year, more than 5 million babies will be born.

In Zika: The Emerging Epidemic, Donald G. McNeil Jr. sets the facts straight in a fascinating exploration of Zika’s origins, how it’s spreading, the race for a cure, and what we can do to protect ourselves now.

Infectious diseases have plagued man throughout history. In the era of modern medicine antibiotics and vaccines brought the hope of liberation from the great scourges of smallpox, polio, and tuberculosis. Yet, in the ensuing decades as we hoped to close the book on infectious diseases, we have instead been confronted by wave upon wave of new assailants. AIDS, SARS, pandemic influenza, and multi-drug resistant bacteria demonstrated how our technological advances have either fallen short in halting or even enhanced the spread of emerging pathogens. International air travel has collapsed geographic boundaries that once confined tropical infections to distant latitudes. Novel forms of immunosuppression, advances in organ transplantation, and victories in the cancer wars have led to an ever-expanding population at risk for opportunistic infections. In this collection of illustrated cases we give a cross-sectional view of the growing challenges that face the infectious diseases consultant. The modern physician is empowered by high resolution imaging and molecular diagnostic techniques that confer diagnostic capabilities Osler could have only dreamed of. Nevertheless we continue to grapple with the timeless struggles illuminated by Pasteur, Koch, and Fleming between man and the microscopic organisms of the world. Part of the new Oxford American Infectious Disease Library series, this book of illustrative cases will appeal to anyone working in a busy infectious diseases consultation service or practice including students, residents, fellows, faculty and other ID practitioners. Featuring numerous high-quality images and illustrations guiding diagnosis and case discussion, the handbook is meant to serve as a highly practical guide covering current approaches and new developments in the diagnosis, treatment, and management of a cross section of infectious diseases, including community-acquired and healthcare-associated infections.
Projecting correctional facility-based health care into the community arena, Public Health Behind Bars: From Prisons to Communities examines the burden of illness in the growing prison population, and analyzes the considerable impact on public health as prisoners are released. More than forty practitioners, researchers, and scholars in correctional health, mental health, law, and public policy make a timely case for correctional health care that is humane for those incarcerated and beneficial to the communities they reenter. These authors offer affirmative recommendations toward that evolutionary step.

Chapter authors identify the most compelling health problems behind bars (including communicable disease, mental illness, addiction, and suicide), pinpoint systemic barriers to care, and explain how correctional medicine can shift from emergency or crisis care to primary care and prevention. In addition, strategies are outlined that link community health resources to correctional facilities so that prisoners can transition to the community without unnecessarily taxing public resources or falling through the cracks. Between the authors’ research findings and practical suggestions, readers will find realistic answers to these and similar questions:

  • Can transmission of HIV, tuberculosis, and other communicable diseases be reduced and prevented among prisoners?
  • How can correctional facilities treat addiction more effectively?
  • What can be done to improve diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric disorders?
  • Can correctional care benefit from quality management and performance measurement?
  • How can care be coordinated between correctional and community health care providers?
  • What are the health risks to communities if action is not taken?

Public Health Behind Bars: From Prisons to Communities is a challenge of immediate interest to readers in correctional health and medicine, public and community health, health care administration and policy, and civil rights.

Protect yourself and your family from the threat of emerging diseases with a detailed, gripping exploration of the dangerous microbes we’re up against, from a respected immunologist and veteran science author—with a new Epilogue by the authors

“[Levy and Fischetti] excel at describing the sleuthing and science that helped to break the code on emerging infections.”—Los Angeles Times

All around us—in our homes, workplaces, and public spaces—bacteria and viruses are evolving at a feverish rate, and our best defenses against them are in danger of being overwhelmed. The threat posed by an emerging outbreak is as formidable as any challenge the human race has ever faced, and the evolutionary scales may be tipping in favor of the microbes.
 
From mad cow disease and Asian bird flu to SARS, West Nile virus, and Ebola, more than thirty new diseases have arisen since the 1970s; and old scourges, from plague to tuberculosis, have reemerged in more dangerous forms. But how imminent, really, is the danger?

Through riveting patient information and a behind-the-scenes tour of the health care system, Levy and Fischetti reveal:
 
• How we’ve managed to contain certain epidemics, while allowing others to rage out of control
• Why the demand for vaccines too often exceeds the supply, and why it took the FDA thirty-four years to approve the first new class of antibiotics since 1965.
• How new infectious diseases manifest themselves, symptoms to watch for, and how to get a correct diagnosis in time
• The latest scientific developments, from new genetic techniques to promising drug programs that might allow us to beat back the microbe menace.
 
The New Killer Diseases will leave you fully informed about the true extent of the threat we face and what you can do to help minimize risk of a pandemic.
 
For epidemiologists, evolutionary biologists, and health-care professionals, real-time and predictive modeling of infectious disease is of growing importance. This book provides a timely and comprehensive introduction to the modeling of infectious diseases in humans and animals, focusing on recent developments as well as more traditional approaches.

Matt Keeling and Pejman Rohani move from modeling with simple differential equations to more recent, complex models, where spatial structure, seasonal "forcing," or stochasticity influence the dynamics, and where computer simulation needs to be used to generate theory. In each of the eight chapters, they deal with a specific modeling approach or set of techniques designed to capture a particular biological factor. They illustrate the methodology used with examples from recent research literature on human and infectious disease modeling, showing how such techniques can be used in practice. Diseases considered include BSE, foot-and-mouth, HIV, measles, rubella, smallpox, and West Nile virus, among others. Particular attention is given throughout the book to the development of practical models, useful both as predictive tools and as a means to understand fundamental epidemiological processes. To emphasize this approach, the last chapter is dedicated to modeling and understanding the control of diseases through vaccination, quarantine, or culling.
  • Comprehensive, practical introduction to infectious disease modeling
  • Builds from simple to complex predictive models
  • Models and methodology fully supported by examples drawn from research literature
  • Practical models aid students' understanding of fundamental epidemiological processes
  • For many of the models presented, the authors provide accompanying programs written in Java, C, Fortran, and MATLAB
  • In-depth treatment of role of modeling in understanding disease control

Avoid the dangerous overuse of antibiotics by using natural herbal remedies to strengthen your own immune defenses.

• Protect yourself and your family from the misuse of antibiotics.

• Learn how to control and overcome infections with natural remedies.

• Maintain a vibrant and healthy immune system without antibiotic dependency.

When antibiotics were discovered they were hailed as the magic bullet that would put an end to the threat of infectious disease. In fact, in 1969 the U.S. Surgeon General stated that "the war against infectious disease has been won." But in the last fifteen years we have faced an alarming increase in cases of bacterial infections that will not respond to antibiotics. What is more, the use of antibiotics in agricultural feeds and the widespread overprescription of antibiotics has deepened the threat of resistant bacteria to potentially epidemic proportions. Even when appropriately prescribed, antibiotics weaken the immune system by altering the body's natural bacterial balance.

While antibiotics have their place in treating acute life-threatening conditions, The Antibiotic Alternative shows how the best defense against infectious disease is to strengthen your own immune system. With advice on stress management and diet and complete monographs of a dozen readily available herbs, Dr. Jones shows you how to ward off infectious disease naturally without antibiotic overdependence. She provides directions for making herbal teas, salves, and tinctures and includes specific herbal recommendations for more than twenty common ailments ranging from acne to wound treatment.
As doctors and biologists have learned, to their dismay, infectious disease is a moving target: new diseases emerge every year, old diseases evolve into new forms, and ecological and socioeconomic upheavals change the transmission pathways by which disease spread. By taking an approach focused on the general evolutionary and ecological dynamics of disease, this Very Short Introduction provides a general conceptual framework for thinking about disease. Ecology and evolution provide the keys to answering the 'where', 'why', 'how', and 'what' questions about any particular infectious disease: where did it come from? How is it transmitted from one person to another, and why are some individuals more susceptible than others? What biochemical, ecological, and evolutionary strategies can be used to combat the disease? Is it more effective to block transmission at the population level, or to block infection at the individual level? Through a series of case studies, Benjamin Bolker and Marta L. Wayne introduce the major ideas of infectious disease in a clear and thoughtful way, emphasising the general principles of infection, the management of outbreaks, and the evolutionary and ecological approaches that are now central to much research about infectious disease. ABOUT THE SERIES: The Very Short Introductions series from Oxford University Press contains hundreds of titles in almost every subject area. These pocket-sized books are the perfect way to get ahead in a new subject quickly. Our expert authors combine facts, analysis, perspective, new ideas, and enthusiasm to make interesting and challenging topics highly readable.
Since publication of the initial version of Plagues & Poxes in 1987, which had the optimistic subtitle "The Rise and Fall of Epidemic Disease," the rise of new diseases such as AIDS and the deliberate modification and weaponization of diseases such as anthrax have changed the way we perceive infectious disease.

With major modifications to deal with this new reality, the acclaimed author of Civil War Medicine: Challenges and Triumphs has updated and revised this series of essays about changing disease patterns in history and some of the key events and people involved in them. It deals with the history of major outbreaks of disease - both infectious diseases such as plague and smallpox and noninfectious diseases - and shows how they are in many cases caused inadvertently by human actions, including warfare, commercial travel, social adaptations, and dietary modifications. To these must now be added discussion of the intentional spreading of disease by acts of bioterrorism, and the history and knowledge of those diseases that are thought to be potential candidates for intentional spread by bioterrorists.

Among the many topics discussed are:

  • How the spread of smallpox and measles among previously unexposed populations in the Americas, the introduction of malaria and yellow fever from Africa via the importation of slaves into the Western hemisphere, and the importation of syphilis to Europe all are related to the modern interchange of diseases such as AIDS.

  • How the ever-larger populations in the cities of Europe and North America gave rise to "crowd diseases" such as polio by permitting the existence of sufficient numbers of non-immune people in sufficient numbers to keep the diseases from dying out.

    How the domestication of animals allowed diseases of animals to affect humans, or perhaps become genetically modified to become epidemic human diseases.

  • Why the concept of deficiency diseases was not understood before the early twentieth century; disease, after all, was the presence of something abnormal, how could it be due to the absence of something? In fact, the first epidemic disease in human history probably was iron deficiency anemia.

  • How changes in the availability and nature of specific foods have affected the size of population groups and their health throughout history. The introduction of potatoes to Ireland and corn to Europe, and the relationship between the modern technique of rice milling and beriberi, all illustrate the fragile nutritional state that results when any single vegetable crop is the main source of food.

  • Why biological warfare is not a new phenomenon. There have been attempts to intentionally cause epidemic disease almost since the dawn of recorded history, including the contamination of wells and other water sources of armies and civilian populations; of course, the spread of smallpox to Native Americans during the French and Indian War is known to every schoolchild. With our increased technology, it is not surprising that we now have to deal with problems such as weaponized spores of anthrax.
Rapid Detection and Identification of Infectious Agents is a collection of papers presented at the International Symposium on Rapid Detection and Identification of Infectious Agents held on October 5-7, 1983, in Oakland, California, and organized by the Naval Biosciences Laboratory of the School of Public Health of the University of California at Berkeley. Contributors examine progress in the field of rapid diagnosis of infectious diseases, with a particular emphasis on DNA probe-based assays and monoclonal and polyclonal antibody-based immunoassays.
This volume is organized into five sections encompassing 20 chapters. It begins with an overview of state-of-the-art methods for rapid detection and identification of infectious agents, including technology that is currently applied in clinical microbiology, as well as concerns regarding the political and scientific climates, which have an impact on health care and clinical microbiology. Chapters are organized to deal with a single diagnostic type of test for a given broad group of organisms. The approach is to compare the strengths and weaknesses of each of the new diagnostic procedures, using the same type of clinical material whenever possible. The book gives consideration to the fundamental design of DNA probes and probe assay systems, the clinical comparison of immunologic assays for the diagnosis of meningococcal disease, and immunodiagnostics for viral and parasitic pathogens.
This book will be of value to scientists and researchers interested in immunology and infectious diseases, as well as the methods used to detect and identify them.
for the design of control programs; in extreme cases (as dis cussed below, by Fine et al. , this volume, and elsewhere) it can happen that immunization programs, although they protect vaccinated individuals, actually increase the overall incidence of a particular disease. The possibility that many nonhuman animal populations may be regulated by parasitic infections is another topic where it may be argued that conventional disciplinary boundaries have retarded investigation. While much ecological research has been devoted to exploring the extent to which competition or predator-prey interactions may regulate natural populations or set their patterns of geographical distribution, few substan tial studies have considered the possibility that infectious diseases may serve as regulatory agents (1,8). On the other hand, the many careful epidemiological studies of the trans mission and maintenance of parasitic infections in human and other animal populations usually assume the host population density to be set by other considerations, and not dynamically engaged with the disease (see, for example, (1,2)). With all these considerations in mind, the Dahlem Workshop from which this book derives aimed to weave strands together -- testing theoretical analysis against empirical facts and patterns, and identifying outstanding problems -- in pursuit of a better un derstanding of the overall population biology of parasitic in fections. For the purpose of the workshop, the term "parasite" was de fined widely to include viruses, bacteria, protozoans, fungi, and helminths.
Discover how the application of novel multidisciplinary, integrative approaches and technologies are dramatically changing our understanding of the pathogenesis of infectious diseases and their treatments. Each article presents the state of the science, with a strong emphasis on new and emerging medical applications.

The Encyclopedia of Infectious Diseases is organized into five parts. The first part examines current threats such as AIDS, malaria, SARS, and influenza. The second part addresses the evolution of pathogens and the relationship between human genetic diversity and the spread of infectious diseases. The next two parts highlight the most promising uses of molecular identification, vector control, satellite detection, surveillance, modeling, and high-throughput technologies. The final part explores specialized topics of current concern, including bioterrorism, world market and infectious diseases, and antibiotics for public health.

Each article is written by one or more leading experts in the field of infectious diseases. These experts place all the latest findings from various disciplines in context, helping readers understand what is currently known, what the next generation of breakthroughs is likely to be, and where more research is needed. Several features facilitate research and deepen readers' understanding of infectious diseases:

  • Illustrations help readers understand the pathogenesis and diagnosis of infectious diseases
  • Lists of Web resources serve as a gateway to important research centers, government agencies, and other sources of information from around the world

  • Information boxes highlight basic principles and specialized terminology

  • International contributions offer perspectives on how infectious diseases are viewed by different cultures

  • A special chapter discusses the representation of infectious diseases in art

With its multidisciplinary approach, this encyclopedia helps point researchers in new promising directions and helps health professionals better understand the nature and treatment of infectious diseases.

This volume is based on the Proceedings of the International Conference on "Microbial Infections: Role of Biological Response Modifiers" held in Tampa, FL, May 29-31, 1991. The major purpose of this conference was to bring together in one forum prominent investigators from around the world studying a variety of microbial pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, and fungi, and the effects of biological response modifiers (BRM) on the immune response to these microorganisms. BRM have been widely utilized in the area of antitumor resistance and include not only experimental tumor cell vaccines, but also biologically active substances such as cytokines, i. e. , interferons, tumor necrosis factor, and interleukins, as well as products from bacteria which influence host resistance mechanisms. It is the belief of the organizers of this Conference that it was very timely to discuss in detail BRMs as they impact on microbial infections per se. It is now widely accepted that immunocompromised individuals, including those exposed to immunosuppressive substances such as antimetabolites used for chemothera py of malignancies, or infectious agents, such as the human immunodeficiency virus and other viruses which depress the immune response and, in turn, affect a host so as to become highly susceptible to opportunistic microorganisms, benefit from BRM stimulation of their immune system. A wide variety of immunomodulators are now being studied in terms of treating infectious diseases, as well as malignancy and autoimmune diseases.
How should we understand the fear and fascination elicited by the accounts of communicable disease outbreaks that proliferated, following the emergence of HIV, in scientific publications and the mainstream media? The repetition of particular characters, images, and story lines—of Patients Zero and superspreaders, hot zones and tenacious microbes—produced a formulaic narrative as they circulated through the media and were amplified in popular fiction and film. The “outbreak narrative” begins with the identification of an emerging infection, follows it through the global networks of contact and contagion, and ends with the epidemiological work that contains it. Priscilla Wald argues that we need to understand the appeal and persistence of the outbreak narrative because the stories we tell about disease emergence have consequences. As they disseminate information, they affect survival rates and contagion routes. They upset economies. They promote or mitigate the stigmatizing of individuals, groups, locales, behaviors, and lifestyles.

Wald traces how changing ideas about disease emergence and social interaction coalesced in the outbreak narrative. She returns to the early years of microbiology—to the identification of microbes and “Typhoid Mary,” the first known healthy human carrier of typhoid in the United States—to highlight the intertwined production of sociological theories of group formation (“social contagion”) and medical theories of bacteriological infection at the turn of the twentieth century. Following the evolution of these ideas, Wald shows how they were affected by—or reflected in—the advent of virology, Cold War ideas about “alien” infiltration, science-fiction stories of brainwashing and body snatchers, and the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Contagious is a cautionary tale about how the stories we tell circumscribe our thinking about global health and human interactions as the world imagines—or refuses to imagine—the next Great Plague.

DDDDDDDDDDDD Effective management logically follows accurate diagnosis. Such logic often is difficult to apply in practice. Absolute diagnostic accuracy may not be possible, particularly in the field of primary care, when management has to be on analysis of symptoms and on knowledge of the individual patient and family. This series follows that on Problems in Practice which was con cerned more with diagnosis in the widest sense and this series deals more definitively with general care and specific treatment of symp toms and diseases. Good management must include knowledge of the nature, course and outcome of the conditions, as well as prominent clinical features and assessment and investigations, but the em phasis is on what to do best for the patient. Family medical practitioners have particular difficu1ties and ad vantages in their work_ Because they often work in professional isolation in the community and deal with relatively small numbers of near-normal patients their experience with the more serious and more rare conditions is restricted. They find it difficult to remain up-to-date with medical advances and even more difficult to decide on the suitability and application of new and relatively untried methods compared with those that are 'old' and well proven. Their advantages are that because of long-term continuous care for their patients they have come to know them and their families FOREWORD well and are able to become familiar with the more common and less serious diseases of their communities.
This book traces the social and environmental determinants of human infectious diseases from the Neolithic to the present day. Despite recent high profile discoveries of new pathogens, the major determinants of these emerging infections are ancient and recurring. These include changing modes of subsistence, shifting populations, environmental disruptions, and social inequalities. The recent labeling of the term "re-emerging infections" reflects a re-emergence, not so much of the diseases themselves, but rather a re-emerging awareness in affluent societies of long-standing problems that were previously ignored. An Unnatural History of Emerging Infections illustrates these recurring problems and determinants through an examination of three major epidemiological transitions. The First Transition occurred with the Agricultural Revolution beginning 10,000 years ago, bringing a rise in acute infections as the main cause of human mortality. The Second Transition first began with the Industrial Revolution; it saw a decline in infectious disease mortality and an increase in chronic diseases among wealthier nations, but less so in poorer societies. These culminated in today's "worst of both worlds syndrome" in which globalization has combined with the challenges of the First and Second Transitions to produce a Third Transition, characterized by a confluence of acute and chronic disease patterns within a single global disease ecology. This accessible text is suitable for advanced undergraduate and graduate level students and researchers in the fields of epidemiology, disease ecology, anthropology, health sciences, and the history of medicine. It will also be of relevance and use to undergraduate students interested in the history and social dynamics of infectious diseases.
Chronic diseases—cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic respiratory disease and diabetes—are not only the principal cause of world-wide mortality but also are now responsible for a striking increase in the percentage of sickness in developing countries still grappling with the acute problems of infectious diseases. This "double disease burden" poses demanding questions concerning the organisation of health care, allocation of scarce resources and strategies for disease prevention, control and treatment; and it threatens not only improvement in health status but economic development in the many poorer countries of the Asia Pacific region.

This book presents an historical account of the development of the double disease burden in Asia and the Pacific, a region which has experienced great economic, social, demographic and political change. With in-depth analysis of more than fifteen countries, this volume examines the impact of the double disease burden on health care regimes, resource allocation, strategies for prevention and control on the wealthiest nations in the region, as well as the smallest Pacific islands. In doing so, the contributors to this book elaborate on the notion of the double disease burden as discussed by epidemiologists, and present real policy responses, whilst demonstrating how vital health is to economic development.

Health Transitions and the Double Disease Burden in Asia and the Pacific will be of great value to both scholars and policy makers in the fields of public health, the history of medicine, as well as to those with a wider interest in the Asia-Pacific region.

Molecular Tools and Infectious Disease Epidemiology examines the opportunities and methodologic challenges in the application of modern molecular genetic and biologic techniques to infectious disease epidemiology.

The application of these techniques dramatically improves the measurement of disease and putative risk factors, increasing our ability to detect and track outbreaks, identify risk factors and detect new infectious agents. However, integration of these techniques into epidemiologic studies also poses new challenges in the design, conduct, and analysis. This book presents the key points of consideration when integrating molecular biology and epidemiology; discusses how using molecular tools in epidemiologic research affects program design and conduct; considers the ethical concerns that arise in molecular epidemiologic studies; and provides a context for understanding and interpreting scientific literature as a foundation for subsequent practical experience in the laboratory and in the field.

The book is recommended for graduate and advanced undergraduate students studying infectious disease epidemiology and molecular epidemiology; and for the epidemiologist wishing to integrate molecular techniques into his or her studies.

  • Presents the key points of consideration when integrating molecular biology and epidemiology
  • Discusses how using molecular tools in epidemiologic research affects program design and conduct
  • Considers the ethical concerns that arise in molecular epidemiologic studies
  • Provides a context for understanding and interpreting scientific literature as a foundation for subsequent practical experience in the laboratory and in the field
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