Maternal–fetal medicine

Fetal and Neonatal Secrets by Drs. Richard Polin and Alan Spitzer, uses the success formula of the highly popular Secrets Series to offer fast answers to the most essential clinical questions in fetal and neonatal medicine. With its user-friendly Q&A format, practical tips from neonatologists and fetal medicine experts, and "Key Points" boxes, this portable and easy-to-read medical reference book provides rapid access to the practical knowledge you need to succeed both in practice and on board and recertification exams.

"Fetal and Neonatal Secrets is a book with an alternative setup that offers answers to a wide spectrum of clinical questions in the field of fetal and neonatal medicine. The book covers both fetal and neonatal medicine, and could be relevant for junior doctors aiming to become obstetricians or pediatricians." Reviewed by: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, January 2015

  • Get the evidence-based guidance you need to provide optimal care for your fetal and neonatal patients.
  • Zero in on key fetal and neonatal information with a question and answer format, bulleted lists, mnemonics, and practical tips from the authors.
  • Enhance your reference power with a two-color page layout, "Key Points" boxes, and lists of useful websites.
  • Review essential material efficiently with the "Top 100 Secrets in Fetal and Neonatal Medicine" – perfect for last-minute study or self-assessment.
  • Apply all the latest pediatric advances in clinical fetal neonatology techniques, technology, and pharmacology
  • With a foreword by John T. Queenan, MD, Professor and Chair Emeritus of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington.

    Fetal medicine has emerged as a separate subspecialty over the last 30 years as a result of major advances in a number of areas, in particular ultrasound imaging, cytogenetics, molecular biology and biochemistry. The widespread use of antenatal screening and diagnostic tests has led to an increased need for obstetricians to have knowledge and skills in fetal medicine. This book provides the information that underpins training programmes in fetal medicine and integrates science and clinical disciplines in a practical and useful way.
    • Basic science sections provide clinicians with a vital introduction to the new language of science that will help them understand new and development treatment options.
    • Clinical sections include: the latest advances in prenatal screening; a systems-based presentation of the diagnosis and management of fetal malformations; complete coverage of common and rare fetal conditions including growth restriction, endocrine and platelet disorders, early pregnancy loss, and twins/multiple pregnancy.
    • Highly illustrated with over 500 ultrasound scans and line drawings.
    • International team of expert contributors.
    • Features new self-assessment section.
    • Written by an international team of experts.
    • Shorter, more focused on fetal medicine
    • Clinical sections written in an up-to-date, problem-based style
    • Case studies and vignettes to illustrate clinical points
    • More focus on important basic-science concepts, such as maternofetal cell trafficking, and the relevance to clinical management
    • Expansion of information on bereavement due to fetal loss
    • New self-assessment section
    The state of health care isreflected by perinatal and neonatal morbidity and mortality as weIl as by the frequencies of long-term neurological and developmental disorders. Many factors, some without immediately recognizable significance to childbearing and many still unknown, undoubtedly contribute beneficially or adversely to the outcome of pregnancy. Knowledge concerning the impact of such factors on the fetus and survivinginfant iscritical. Confounding analysesofpregnancy outcome, especially these past 2 or 3 decades, are the effects of newly undertaken invasive or inactive therapeutic approaches coupled with the advent of high technology. Many innovations have been introduced without serious efforts to evaluate their impact prospectively and objectively. The consequences of therapeutic misadventures character ized the past; it seems they have been replaced to a degree by some of the complications of applied technology. Examples abound: after overuse of oxygen was recognized to cause retrolental fibroplasia, its restriction led to an increase in both neonatal death rates and neurologic damage in surviving infants. Administration of vitamin K to prevent neonatal hemorrhagic disease, particularly when given in what we now know as excessive dosage, occasionally resulted in kernicterus. Prophy lactic sulfonamide use had a similar end result. More recent is the observation of bronchopulmonary dysplasia as a complication of re spirator therapy for hyaline membrane disease. The decade of the eighties opened with the all-time highest rate of cesarean section in the United States.
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