Far East

Archaeology of East Asia constitutes an introduction to social and political development from the Palaeolithic to 8th-century early historic times. It takes a regional view across China, Korea, Japan and their peripheries that is unbounded by modern state lines. This viewpoint emphasizes how the region drew on indigenous developments and exterior stimuli to produce agricultural technologies, craft production, political systems, religious outlooks and philosophies that characterize the civilization of historic and even modern East Asia. This book is a complete rewrite and update of The Rise of Civilization in East Asia, first published in 1993. It incorporates the many theoretical, technical and factual advances of the last two decades, including DNA, gender, and isotope studies, AMS radiocarbon dating and extensive excavation results. Readers of that first edition will find the same structure and topic progression. While many line drawings have been retained, new color illustrations abound. Boxes and Appendices clarify and add to the understanding of unfamiliar technologies. For those seeking more detail, the Appendices also provide case studies that take intimate looks at particular data and current research. The book is suitable for general readers, East Asian historians and students, archaeology students and professionals. Praise for The Rise of Civilization in East Asia: “… the best English introduction to the archaeology of East Asia … brilliantly integrates the three areas into a broad regional context.” Prof. Mark Hudson
It's never a good idea to be overly–relient on technology while traveling! Look up words quickly and easily with this great little Korean dictionary.

Intended for use by tourists, students, and business people traveling to Korea Pocket Korean Dictionary is an essential tool for communication and a great way to learn Korean. It features all the essential Korean vocabulary appropriate for beginning to intermediate students. It's handy pocket format and easy-to read type will make any future trip to Korea much easier.

In addition to being an excellent English to Korean dictionary and Korean to English dictionary Pocket Korean Dictionary contains important notes on the Korean language, Korean grammar and Korean pronunciation. All Korean words are written in English as well as Korean script (hangul) so that in the case of difficulties the book can simply be shown to the person the user is trying to communicate with.

This dictionary contains:
  • The 3,000 most commonly used words in the Korean language.
  • English–Korean and Korean–English sections.
  • Hangul and Romanized Korean.
  • An introduction to and history of the Korean language.
  • Information on Korean grammar.
  • A guide to pronouncing Korean correctly.

Other books from this bestselling series you might enjoy are: Pocket Tagalog Dictionary, Pocket Vietnamese Dictionary, Pocket Mandarin Chinese Dictionary, Pocket Cantonese Dictionary, Pocket Cambodian Dictionary, Pocket Indonesian Dictionary, Pocket Thai Dictionary, and Pocket Malay Dictionary.
This portable, user–friendly Korean language guide, phrasebook and dictionary is the cheapest and easiest way to learn Korean before and during your trip.

If you only want to purchase one Korean language book—Essential Korean is the way to go. Part of Tuttle Publishing's Essential Series, it is a great first introduction and beginner guide to the language of South Korea and is also designed as a Korean phrasebook, making it the most versatile Korean language learning tool on the market.

Perfect for business people or tourist traveling to Korea or for students who want to supplement their learning, this book's easy indexing feature allows it to act as a Korean phrase book or as an English–Korean Dictionary. A clever "point to" feature allows you to simply point to a phrase translated in Korean without the need to say a word. You will soon find yourself turning to Essential Korean again and again when you study Korean, visit Korea and work or interacting with Koreans.

In this book you will find:
  • Over 1500 practical sentences for everyday use.
  • A Korean dictionary of over 2000 terms and expressions.
  • Extensive information about Korean grammar and pronunciation.
  • Latest Korean vocabulary and Korean phrases for smartphones, social media and more.
This beginner Korean book will help you to quickly and easily learn Korean. Your ability to read Korean, write Korean, speak Korean, and comprehend Korean will be vastly improved without having to take an entire Korean language class. Other titles in this bestselling series of phrasebooks include: Essential Japanese, Essential Chinese, Essential Korean, Essential Tagalog, and Essential Arabic.
Making Out in Korean is a fun, accessible and thorough Korean phrasebook and guide to the Korean language as it's really spoken.

Nan neoga joa michigesseo! Uri tto mannalkka?—(I'm crazy about you! Shall we meet again?) Answer this correctly in Korean and you may be going on a hot date. Incorrectly, and you could be hurting someone's feelings or getting a slap! Korean classes and textbooks tend to spend a lot of time rehearsing for the same fictitious scenarios but chances are while in Korea you will spend a lot more time trying to make new friends or start new romances—something you may not be prepared for.

If you are a student, businessman or tourist traveling to South Korea or North Korea and would like to have an authentic and meaningful experience, the key is being able to speak like a local. This friendly and easy-to-use Korean phrase book makes this possible. Making out in Korean has been carefully designed to act as a guide to modern colloquial Korean for use in everyday informal interactions—giving access to the sort of catchy Korean expressions that aren't covered in traditional language materials. As well as the Romanized forms (romanji), each expression is given in authentic Korean script (hangul), so that in the case of difficulties the book can be shown to the person the user is trying to communicate with. In addition, easy-to-use phonetic spellings of all Korean words and phrases are given. For example "How are you?"—annyeonghaseyo? is also written as anh-nyawng-hah-seyo?

This Korean phrasebook includes:
  • A guide to pronouncing Korean words correctly.
  • Explanations of basic Korean grammar, such as, word order, questions, and formal vs. informal tenses.
  • Complete Korean translations including Korean Script (hangul).
  • Useful and interesting notes on Korean language and culture.
  • Lots of colorful, fun and useful expressions not covered in other phrasebooks.

Titles in this unique series of bestselling phrase books include: Making Out in Chinese, Making Out in Indonesian, Making Out in Thai, Making Out in Korean, Making Out in Hindi, Making Out in Japanese, Making Out in Vietnamese, Making out in Burmese, Making Out in Tagalog, Making Out in Hindi, Making Out in Arabic, Making Out in English, More Making Out in Korean, and More Making Out in Japanese.
A surprising, gripping narrative depicting the thinkers whose ideas shaped contemporary China, India, and the Muslim world

A little more than a century ago, as the Japanese navy annihilated the giant Russian one at the Battle of Tsushima, original thinkers across Asia, working independently, sought to frame a distinctly Asian intellectual tradition that would inform and inspire the continent's anticipated rise to dominance.

Asian dominance did not come to pass, and those thinkers—Tagore, Gandhi, and later Nehru in India; Liang Qichao and Sun Yatsen in China; Jamal al-Din al-Afghani and Abdurreshi al Ibrahim in the ruins of the Ottoman Empire—are seen as outriders from the main anticolonial tradition. But Pankaj Mishra shows that it was otherwise in this stereotype-shattering book. His enthralling group portrait of like minds scattered across a vast continent makes clear that modern Asia's revolt against the West is not the one led by faith-fired terrorists and thwarted peasants but one with deep roots in the work of thinkers who devised a view of life that was neither modern nor antimodern, neither colonialist nor anticolonialist. In broad, deep, dramatic chapters, Mishra tells the stories of these figures, unpacks their philosophies, and reveals their shared goal of a greater Asia.

Right now, when the emergence of a greater Asia seems possible as at no previous time in history, From the Ruins of Empire is as necessary as it is timely—a book essential to our understanding of the world and our place in it.
Written with rare mastery and a sure sense of the essential, this concise general history of modern East Asia offers students and general readers an understanding of this dynamic region from a global perspective. It is the ideal introductory text for college survey courses in Asian and international studies.Following an introductory discussion of the regional concept, the first two chapters lay the foundations. Chapter 1 describes East Asia's geographical, human, cultural, economic, social, and political setting as it has evolved over the past several millennia, and the three major belief systems - Confucianism, Buddhism, and Islam. Chapter 2 presents a panoramic view of the region ca. 1800. The chapter introduces the "dramatis personae" - the Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, Vietnamese, Thai, Burmese, Indonesians, Filipinos, and others - and describes their interactions with each other and with Imperial China.The following three chapters deal with European expansionism and East Asians' responses to the civilizational challenge; the stirrings of nationalism in reaction to European colonial rule; and the remarkable rise of Imperial Japan. Chapters 6 and 7 trace Japan's bid to lead a pan-Asianist revolt against the twin threats of Western liberalism and Soviet communism, and the ensuing Pacific War. Chapters 8 and 9 span the cold war era, from postwar U.S. hopes for a "Pax Americana" to the division of East Asia into communist and anti-communist blocs. The Sino-Soviet split and the Sino-American rapprochement of the early 1970s open the way to the "East Asian miracle" and a resurgence of East Asian regionalism, surveyed in Chapter 10. A concluding chapter considers the prospects for continued economic dynamism and the balance of nationalism and pan-Asian trends in shaping the future.
Genghis Khan is one of history's immortals, alive in memory as a scourge, hero, military genius and demi-god. To Muslims, Russians and westerners, he is a murderer of millions, a brutal oppressor. Yet in his homeland of Mongolia he is the revered father of the nation, and the Chinese honor him as the founder of a dynasty. In his so-called Mausoleum in Inner Mongolia, worshippers seek the blessing of his spirit. In a supreme paradox, the world's most ruthless conqueror has become a force for peace and reconciliation.

As a teenager, Genghis was a fugitive, hiding from enemies on a remote mountainside. Yet he went on to found the world's greatest land empire and change the course of world history. Brilliant and original as well as ruthless, he ruled an empire twice the size of Rome's until his death in 1227 placed all at risk. To secure his conquests and then extend them, his heirs kept his death a secret, and secrecy has surrounded him ever since. His undiscovered grave, with its imagined treasures, remains the subject of intrigue and speculation.

This is more than just a gripping account of Genghis' rise and conquests. John Man uses first-hand experiences in China and Mongolia to reveal the khan's enduring influence. He has traveled the length of the empire. He spotlights the tension between Mongols and Chinese, who both claim Genghis' spirit. He is the first writer to explore the hidden valley where Genghis is believed to have died, and one of the few westerners to climb the mountain where he was likely buried.

This stunning narrative paints a vivid picture of the man himself, the places where he lived and fought, and the passions that surround him still. For in legend, ritual and intense controversy, Genghis lives on.
Centering his analysis in the dynamic forces of modern East Asian history, Kuan-Hsing Chen recasts cultural studies as a politically urgent global endeavor. He argues that the intellectual and subjective work of decolonization begun across East Asia after the Second World War was stalled by the cold war. At the same time, the work of deimperialization became impossible to imagine in imperial centers such as Japan and the United States. Chen contends that it is now necessary to resume those tasks, and that decolonization, deimperialization, and an intellectual undoing of the cold war must proceed simultaneously. Combining postcolonial studies, globalization studies, and the emerging field of “Asian studies in Asia,” he insists that those on both sides of the imperial divide must assess the conduct, motives, and consequences of imperial histories.

Chen is one of the most important intellectuals working in East Asia today; his writing has been influential in Taiwan, South Korea, Hong Kong, Japan, Singapore, and mainland China for the past fifteen years. As a founding member of the Inter-Asia Cultural Studies Society and its journal, he has helped to initiate change in the dynamics and intellectual orientation of the region, building a network that has facilitated inter-Asian connections. Asia as Method encapsulates Chen’s vision and activities within the increasingly “inter-referencing” East Asian intellectual community and charts necessary new directions for cultural studies.

Facts and Figures

General / Geography / People / National Flag / National Anthem (Aegukga) / Government / Economy / Korea’s World Heritage

 

Korea and Its People

Geography / Climate / Population / Language

 

History

Gojoseon / Three Kingdoms and Gaya / Unified Silla and Balhae / Goryeo / Joseon / Japanese Occupation and Independence Movement / Founding of the Republic of Korea

 

Constitution and Government

Constitution / Executive Branch / Legislature / Judiciary / Independent Organizations / Local Government

 

Inter-Korean Relations

Historical Background / Efforts Toward Peaceful Resolution of the North Korean Nuclear Issue / Inter-Korean Exchanges and Cooperation

 

Korea in the World

International Relations / Economic Exchanges / International Peace and Cooperation / Korean's Development Cooperation / Future Policy Directions

 

Economy

Economic Growth / Industrial Innovation / Science and Technology / Information and Telecommunications / Economic Challenges / Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) / Capital Market Liberalization / Investor-Oriented Support System / World-Class Logistics Hub / Economic Outlook

 

Society

Social Welfare / Education / Media

 

Culture and the Arts

UNESCO Treasures in Korea / Fine Arts / Literature / Painting / Music and Dance / Drama and Movies / Museums and Theaters

 

Korean Life

Houses / Clothing / Food / Festivals / Religion

 

Sports

Seoul Olympics in Retrospect / Overall Olympic Standing / 2002 FIFA World Cup Korea, Japan / National Sports Events / Popular Sports /

Traditional Sports

 

Tourism

Travel Advice / Transportation / Accommodation / Exploring Korea / Shopping

 

In India, you can still find the kabaadiwala, the rag-and-bone man. He wanders from house to house buying old newspapers, broken utensils, plastic bottles—anything for which he can get a little cash. This custom persists and recreates itself alongside the new economies and ecologies of consumer capitalism. Waste of a Nation offers an anthropological and historical account of India’s complex relationship with garbage. Countries around the world struggle to achieve sustainable futures. Assa Doron and Robin Jeffrey argue that in India the removal of waste and efforts to reuse it also lay waste to the lives of human beings. At the bottom of the pyramid, people who work with waste are injured and stigmatized as they deal with sewage, toxic chemicals, and rotting garbage. Terrifying events, such as atmospheric pollution and childhood stunting, that touch even the wealthy and powerful may lead to substantial changes in practices and attitudes toward sanitation. And innovative technology along with more effective local government may bring about limited improvements. But if a clean new India is to emerge as a model for other parts of the world, a “binding morality” that reaches beyond the current environmental crisis will be required. Empathy for marginalized underclasses—Dalits, poor Muslims, landless migrants—who live, almost invisibly, amid waste produced predominantly for the comfort of the better-off will be the critical element in India’s relationship with waste. Solutions will arise at the intersection of the traditional and the cutting edge, policy and practice, science and spirituality.
Violation of the rights of a human being and indifference in the face of suffering jeopardize the very existence of human society. The Holocaust is the most extreme example of such violations, and the greatest moral failure mankind has experienced. Confronting the Holocaust, as well as genocide, may contribute to understanding the importance of humanistic and democratic values, and help construct tools for making moral judgments. That is why courses on the study of genocide and the Holocaust have become part of the curricula of educational institutions in the United States and elsewhere. This book asks how the moral messages of the Holocaust and genocide can best be transmitted. The Pain of Knowledge deals not with historical events, but with possible ways of learning about these events and their significance. It attempts to examine and deal critically with some of the profound dilemmas at the core of Holocaust and genocide issues in education. The underlying purpose of this book is to expose the reader to sometimes antithetical, and at other times complementary, views concerning the teaching of these subjects, both in Israel and elsewhere in the world. This book will contribute to the teaching of the Holocaust and genocide, and encourage readers to examine these issues from a broad perspective. Among the subjects dealt with in The Pain of Knowledge are: how societies crystallize their collective memories; historical processes and changes in the teaching of the Holocaust in Israel during different periods of time; commemoration of Holocaust Martyrs and Heroes Remembrance Day; journeys of Israeli youth to sites connected with the Holocaust in Poland; attitudes of Israeli adolescents toward the Holocaust; attitudes of Israeli Arabs toward the Holocaust; general world attitudes toward the Holocaust; teaching of the Holocaust throughout the world; and teaching of genocide in Israel and elsewhere. Yair Auron is senior lecturer at The Open University of Israel and the Kibbutzim College of Education. He is the author of numerous articles and books on genocide and on contemporary Judaism, including Jewish-Israeli Identity and We Are All German Jews: Jewish Radicals in France During the Sixties and Seventies.
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