Library science

In George Bobinski's sixty-year career as a library professional (1945 – 2005), libraries underwent massive changes and epochal advancements. In this important work, Bobinski summarizes the major trends and events that have transformed the library world and the profession of librarianship into what it is today.

Libraries and Librarianship begins with a historical review of the core of librarianship, focusing on the information formats available in or through libraries; the organization of library information sources; changes in reference service; trends in library management; and the all-embracing impact of technology on libraries. Bobinski also addresses library types and the growth of library cooperation and resource sharing; the spread of collaboration through library systems, consortia, and networks; federal funding, library philanthropy, and the important role of the Council on Library and Information Resources since its establishment in 1956; the growth and activities of professional library associations; the shifting roles of gender and ethnicity; and the changes in library buildings.

Furthermore, a list of eminent individuals who had the greatest impact on the field during this period and influenced the dramatic changes that have taken place in library and information science education is included. Concluding with a discussion of the major developments in the field and providing a look into what the future might hold for libraries, this book will be embraced by library students, practitioners, and professors alike.
Much has happened since the last edition of this benchmark text was published. Today’s LIS professionals are experiencing both excitement and trepidation as sweeping societal, technological, political, and economic changes affect our users and institutions and transform our discipline. We are increasingly part of a sophisticated infrastructure: the boundaries of knowledge creation, acquisition, organization, dissemination, use, and evaluation are rapidly blurring, creating new challenges. Similarly, we are also part of a changing environment: an aging population, a ubiquitous and evolving internet, the proliferation of social media and mobile devices, significant financial stresses on public institutions, and changing information policies affecting creators and distributors of knowledge. The profession demands constant growth, continuous learning, and open minds, and the new edition of Rubin’s book offers a firm foundation of knowledge and guidance for LIS students and professionals alike. Responding to the many changes occurring both in the field and in society at large, this text includes comprehensive coverage of

- the history and mission of libraries, from past to present;

- digital devices, social networking, and other technology;

- the impact of digital publishing on the publishing industry and the effects of eBooks on libraries, values and ethics of the profession;

-how library services have evolved in the areas of virtual reference, embedded librarianship, digital access and repositories, digital preservation, and civic engagement;

- new and ongoing efforts to organize knowledge, such as FRBR, RDA: Resource Description and Access, BIBFRAME, the Semantic Web, and the Next Generation Catalog (Catalog 2.0);the significance of the digital divide and policy issues related to broadband access and network neutrality;

- the concept of intellectual freedom, and how it plays out in the real world;

- legal developments like new interpretations of copyright related to mass digitization of books (Google Books) and scholarly articles;

- the continuing tensions in LIS education between information science and library science; and

- initiatives to integrate libraries, archives, and museums (LAMs);

Spanning all types of libraries, from public to academic, school, and special, this book illuminates the major facets of library and information science for aspiring professionals as well as those already practicing in the field.

This text provides an overview of major critical theorists from across disciplines--including the humanities, social sciences, and education--that discusses the importance of these critical perspectives for the advancement of LIS research and scholarship.


The practical application of library and information science is based upon 75 years of critical theory and thought. Therefore, it is essential for students and faculty in LIS to be familiar with the work of a wide range of critical theorists. The aim of Critical Theory for Library and Information Science: Exploring the Social from Across the Disciplines is to provide a comprehensive introduction to the critical theorists important to the LIS audience, and to give insights into how such theory can be incorporated into actual LIS research and practice.

This book consists of chapters on individual critical theorists ranging from Aglietta to Habermas to Spivak, written by an international group of library and information science scholars. Each chapter provides an overview of the theoretical stance and contributions of the theorist, as well as relevant critical commentary. This book will be particularly valuable as a reference text of core readings for those pursuing doctoral or masters level degrees in LIS.


  • A basic bibliography of the theorist's work follows each topic presentation; some chapters also include works of critical commentary on the theorist's writings
  • Indexes of key terms and concepts are provided throughout the chapters
  •  In the almost 15 years since Our Enduring Values was published, there has been a sea change in the way much of the world thinks about and uses libraries. Young librarians and seasoned LIS professionals alike are experiencing increasing pressure to adjust to new economic, societal, and technological demands amidst the often-dire rhetoric currently surrounding the future of our institutions. In this stirring manifesto, public intellectual, librarian, and philosopher Gorman addresses head on the “existential panic” among library professionals caused by the radical shift in how libraries are viewed. He reconnects readers with the core values that continue to inspire generations of library professionals and scholars—while making the case that these values are doubly crucial to hold on to in the brave new shifting world of librarianship. Destined to become another classic of library literature, this book explores such contemporary issues asThe growing emphasis of the library as a cultural institution, placing libraries within their cultural context as gathering places for learning, access to information, and communityThe impact of technological innovations on core values such as access and stewardshipLibrary places and spaces of the futureHow the mass digitization of books, archives, and other materials affects the purpose and function of librariesIntellectual freedom and privacy in the era of the PATRIOT Act, Wikileaks, and Edward SnowdenThe role of libraries as both champions and facilitators of social justiceInspirational yet clear-sighted, Gorman emphatically reaffirms the importance of libraries and librarians while proposing a path for future survival and growth.
    Thinking about the future of libraries, librarianship and the work librarians do is as old as libraries themselves. (No doubt seminars were organized by the Alexandria Librarians Association on the future of the scroll and what to do about the rising barbarian tide.) At no time in our memory, though, have these discussions and conversations been so profound and critical.

    Here one of today’s leading thinkers and speakers about the future of libraries brings together 30 leaders from all types of libraries and from outside librarianship to describe their vision of what the library will be in 2020. Contributors including Stephen Abram, Susan Hildreth, Marie Radford, Clifford Lynch, and Library Journal’s The Annoyed Librarian were asked to describe the “library of 2020,” in whatever terms they wanted, either a specific library or situation or libraries in general. They were told: “be bold, be inspirational, be hopeful, be true, be provocative, be realistic, be depressing, be light-hearted, be thoughtful, be fun…be yourself, and for heaven’s sake, don’t be boring.” Not that they could be.

    Broadly representative of important perspectives and aspects within the profession as well as featuring important voices beyond the professional realm, Library 2020 presents thought-provoking and illuminating visions from many points of view. It is both required reading for library leaders and trustees as well as an ideal supplemental text for LIS classes looking at the future of the profession.
    This Gower Handbook is an authoritative guide to both the traditional and newer aspects of library and information management. Edited by Ray Prytherch, it brings together the insight of a range of respected contributors, who offer advice on the management, storage, retrieval, analysis, marketing and delivery of information. The book begins with Part I analyzing the context and trends of the information world. In Part II, Strategy and Planning, the information environment is explored in more detail, with Chapters 3 and 4 presenting the main issues and principles of financial planning and strategic planning. Part III, The Service Infrastructure, looks at customer care, the role of performance measurement and research in service improvement, and the influence of copyright law in the delivery of information products to customers. Part IV, Managing Resources, includes five chapters on strategic management, information auditing, human resource management, preservation and disaster management. The last part of the Handbook, Part V, Access and Delivery, focuses on the potential of electronic systems with chapters on subject gateways and Z39.50, electronic publishing, intranets and new models of access and delivery. Each part of the Handbook begins with an introduction by the editor and the book concludes with a directory of organizations, including useful URLs, and a glossary. Flexibility and adaptability are crucial for information professionals if they are to maintain their skills at the right level to provide the services needed by both information-rich and information-poor. In this one book librarians from all backgrounds, information managers and officers, document and records managers, and network and Web specialists will find answers to a wide range of questions that confront them in their working day. The Handbook will become a standard reference on best practice for professionals and students. It will be of interest to information analysts, knowledge managers, and others, including publishers, involved in information maintenance and provision.

    This work presents a thorough examination of librarianship and the social and economic contexts in which the profession and its institutions operate. As a basis of analysis, Buschman employs critical education scholarship and the research of German philosopher Jurgen Habermas, whose seminal work on the public sphere--the arena in which the public organizes itself and formulates public opinion--serves as a meta-framework for Buschman's study of librarianship. Buschman asserts that a significant shift has occurred from the library as a contributor to the public good to a model where economic rationality directs policy. He challenges much of the current thinking and assumptions guiding libraries, exploring the circumstances in which librarians and libraries operate and linking the profession back to democratic and public purposes as the core essence of the field.

    Chapters include:

    - Crisis Culture and the Need for a Defense of Librarianship in the Public Sphere

    - The New Public Philosophy and Critical Educational Analysis

    - The Public Sphere: Rounding Out the Context of Librarianship

    - Studies in Librarianship and the Dismantling of the Public Sphere

    - Follow the Money: Library Funding and Information Capitalism

    - Follow-the-Leader Library Management and the New Public Philosophy

    - On Customer Driven Librarianship

    - Drifting Toward the Corporate Model: ALA

    - Notes on Postmodern Technology, Technocracy, and Libraries

    - The Public Sphere and Democratic Possibility

    Highly recommended for courses in policy and librarianship, as well as for academic and public library directors, this work will also be of interest to theorists in the social sciences.

    The Mindful Librarian: Connecting the Practice of Mindfulness to Librarianship explores mindfulness, approaching it in such a way as to relate specifically to the many roles or challenges librarians face. Coinciding with the increased need to juggle a variety of tasks, technologies, ebooks, and databases, the new Association of College & Research Libraries Framework for Information Literacy, and the challenges faced by solo librarians in school libraries which have suffered cutbacks in help in recent years, the time is exactly right for this publication.

    The authors hope to be helpful in some small way towards improving the joy and quality of life that librarians and library science students experience in their personal lives and jobs. The loftier goal would be to create a new lens from which to view librarianship, having a transformative impact on readers, and opening a new dialog within the profession.

    The topic of mindfulness is not new; it has been connected to various religious traditions in a wide variety of ways for centuries, most notably Buddhism. In the latter part of the 20th century, however, a secular version was popularized largely by the work of Jon Kabat-Zinn and his work on MBSR (Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction) at the University of Massachusetts’s Medical School.

    The medical benefits and the overall quality of life improvements from its adoption have exploded in recent years, in particular, the last two decades which have seen mindfulness traditions incorporated into education to a greater degree and with very positive results.

    • Presents the only current LIS book that covers this topic in a way that applies directly to librarians
    • Provides a topic that will be appealing to librarians, as it speaks to the pressures of budget cuts and consumer culture being felt across the academy
    • Seeks to improve the joy and quality of life that librarians and library science students experience in their personal lives and jobs
    Recipient of the 2012 ACRL Instruction Section Ilene F. Rockman Publication of the Year AwardForeword by Sarah Houghton-JanWhether or not "instruction" appears in their job titles, librarians are often in the position of educating their users, colleagues, and peers to successfully locate and evaluate information. Because MLIS education tends to offer less-than-comprehensive preparation in pedagogy and instructional design, this much-needed book tackles the challenge of effective teaching and training head-on. Char Booth, an avid library education and technology advocate, introduces a series of concepts that will empower readers at any level of experience to become better designers and presenters, as well as building their confidence and satisfaction as library educators. Laying the foundation for effective teaching, Booth outlines a four-part framework of Instructional Literacy, which includesReflective Practice: tools for improving learning in the moment and developing a teacher identity, as well as approaches to collaboration and creating communities of practiceEducational Theory: evidence-based strategies in learning and instructional researchTeaching Technologies: evaluating and integrating technology in learning using a practical "toolkit" approachInstructional Design: a systematic and outcomes-based strategy for developing and assessing learning experiencesThis foundation is supplemented by the USER Method, a step-by-step approach to creating learner-focused instruction. Tailored to library contexts, USER walks readers through understanding an instructional scenario, structuring content, engaging learners, and reflecting on outcomes. Also included are templates for instructional planning and technology evaluation, as well as practical advice and scenarios from those working in the field. Entailing a methodical approach to educating oneself about this emerging field, Booth's work helps librarians become better learners and teachers.
    How librarians can be radical positive change agents in their communities, dedicated to learning and making a difference.

    This book offers a guide for librarians who see their profession as a chance to make a positive difference in their communities—librarians who recognize that it is no longer enough to stand behind a desk waiting to serve. R. David Lankes, author of The Atlas of New Librarianship, reminds librarians of their mission: to improve society by facilitating knowledge creation in their communities. In this book, he provides tools, arguments, resources, and ideas for fulfilling this mission. Librarians will be prepared to become radical positive change agents in their communities, and other readers will learn to understand libraries in a new way.

    The librarians of Ferguson, Missouri, famously became positive change agents in August 2014 when they opened library doors when schools were closed because of civil unrest after the shooting of an unarmed teen by police. Working with other local organizations, they provided children and their parents a space for learning, lunch, and peace. But other libraries serve other communities—students, faculty, scholars, law firms—in other ways. All libraries are about community, writes Lankes; that is just librarianship.

    In concise chapters, Lankes addresses the mission of libraries and explains what constitutes a library. He offers practical advice for librarian training; provides teaching notes for each chapter; and answers “Frequently Argued Questions” about the new librarianship.

    Designed for librarians who work with all age levels from youngsters to seniors at all educational, reading and language backgrounds, who must fulfill responsibilities that run the gamut from instructing patrons on information literacy skills to using electronic tools to marketing the library to locating funding, Infographics: A Practical Guide for Librarians provides librarians with the following:
    • Section I: Infographics 101 contains definitions, history, importance in today’s society, types and examples, advantages and disadvantages, general uses, uses in libraries, tools for creation and design tips.
    • Section II: Practical applications show how to use infographics in academic, public, special and school libraries. Included are visual examples and step-by-step instructions to create two infographics

    Included in each section are exercises, tables with URLs to more ideas and materials and references.

    This practical guide will help every type and size of library use infographics as a powerful part in their 21st century game plan. Whether it's marketing the public library, improving students information literacy skills in a school library or showcasing the accomplishments of the academic library, infographics can be a vital part of the library's playbook. The book describes ways to use infographics to:
    • raise funds for a public library
    • teach critical thinking and 21st century skills in the school library
    • illustrate why libraries matter by relaying value of academic libraries
    • market the library
    • improve information literacy in academic settings
    • advocate for resources and services.

    Digital Libraries: Policy, Planning and Practice brings together a wealth of international experience in the planning and implementation of digital and hybrid library projects, providing a stimulating and informative handbook and reference for library staff and information managers. It consists of chapters contributed by leading specialists from Europe, North America, South Africa and the Middle East, who offer their insight into the decision-making processes that have shaped a variety of different digitization programmes. Beginning with introductory overviews of the digital library context, the US Digital Library Program and the UK e-lib and hybrid library programmes, Digital Libraries then divides into two main sections on policy and planning, and implementation and practice. The first explores concerns such as financial and resource planning, digitized compared to born-digital content and related service issues, open access to scholarly research archives, policies for and against preservation and their justification, and evaluating electronic information services. The second section is based on case studies on major European and North American digital library projects, including the Glasgow Digital Library, UCEEL (University of Central England Electronic Library), the Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations (discussed in the context of five international projects), the Indiana University music Variations and Variations2 Project, and the beginnings of the Library of Congress digital program and its integration into core library services. The concluding chapter discusses the way forward for digital libraries in the context of experiences at Tilburg University library, and possible enabling or limiting factors in the future. The result of drawing together these varied and illuminating experiences is a book that offers useful information and comparisons for all digital library project staff, institutional administrators, educators and developers of learning technology. It also provides useful pointers for researchers and project staff involved in archive and museum projects, as well as introducing students to the key ingredients of successful digital libraries.
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