Similar ebooks

As well as editing the famous Fairy Books, Andrew Lang created a diverse oeuvre of short story collections, novels, poetry and a scholarly corpus of essays and non-fiction books. This Delphi edition offers a comprehensive range of Lang’s prolific works, with thousands of beautiful illustrations, as well as the usual bonus texts. (Current version: 2)

* the complete Fairy Books, all fully-illustrated with their original Victorian artwork – first time in digital print
* special contents table for the Fairy Books
* ALL the novels, with contents tables
* images of how the books first appeared, giving your eReader a taste of the Victorian texts
* many short story collections, with beautiful illustrations
* ARABIAN NIGHTS fully illustrated – first time in digital print
* 13 poetry collections, with contents tables and illustrations
* special chronological and alphabetical contents tables for the poetry – find that special poem quickly and easily!
* features 29 non-fiction books, each with contents tables
* includes two biographical essays on Lang – explore the writer’s literary life!
* many images relating to Lang’s life and works
* scholarly ordering of texts in chronological order and literary genres, allowing easy navigation around Lang’s immense oeuvre

CONTENTS:

The Fairy Books
THE BLUE FAIRY BOOK
THE RED FAIRY BOOK
THE GREEN FAIRY BOOK
THE YELLOW FAIRY BOOK
THE PINK FAIRY BOOK
THE GREY FAIRY BOOK
THE VIOLET FAIRY BOOK
THE CRIMSON FAIRY BOOK
THE BROWN FAIRY BOOK
THE ORANGE FAIRY BOOK
THE OLIVE FAIRY BOOK
THE LILAC FAIRY BOOK

The Fairy Tales
LIST OF THE TALES IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER
LIST OF THE TALES IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER

Other Story Collections
MUCH DARKER DAYS
IN THE WRONG PARADISE AND OTHER STORIES
HE
THE GOLD OF FAIRNILEE
PRINCE PRIGIO
THE TRUE STORY BOOK
PRINCE RICARDO OF PANTOUFLIA
ANGLING SKETCHES
THE BOOK OF DREAMS AND GHOSTS
ARABIAN NIGHTS
THE DISENTANGLERS
THE RED TRUE STORY BOOK
TALES OF TROY AND GREECE
THE ANIMAL STORY BOOK
THE BOOK OF ROMANCE
THE RED ROMANCE BOOK
THE RED BOOK OF HEROES by Mrs. Lang
TALES OF ROMANCE
THE STRANGE STORY BOOK by Mrs. Lang

The Novels
THE MARK OF CAIN
THE WORLD’S DESIRE
PARSON KELLY

The Poetry Collections
BALLADS, LYRICS, AND POEMS OF OLD FRANCE
THE ODYSSEY
THEOCRITUS BION AND MOSCHUS
BALLADS IN BLUE CHINA
HELEN OF TROY
THE ILIAD
RHYMES A LA MODE
AUCASSIN AND NICOLETE
A COLLECTION OF BALLADS
GRASS OF PARNASSUS
BAN AND ARRIERE BAN
THE NURSERY RHYME BOOK
NEW COLLECTED RHYMES

The Poetry
LIST OF POEMS IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER
LIST OF POEMS IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER

The Non-Fiction
OXFORD
THE LIBRARY
and many more - too many to list

The Biographies
ANDREW LANG by Edmund Gosse
SPENCER WALPOLE AND ANDREW LANG by Horace G. Hutchinson
Sleeping Beauty Stories includes several stories across several decades from the beginning of is imaginative creation. The story that brought to life the sensational Maleficent the new Disney movie. Includes the stories of Andrew Lang (1844-1912), Charles Perrault, and others. The story: At the christening of a king and queen's long-wished-for child, seven fairies are invited to be godmothers to the infant princess. At the banquet back at the palace, the fairies seat themselves with a golden casket containing golden jeweled utensils laid before them. However, a fairy who was overlooked, having been within a certain tower for many years and thought to be either dead or enchanted, enters and is offered a seating, but not a golden casket since only seven were made. The fairies then offer their gifts of beauty, wit, grace, dance, song and music. The bad fairy, angry at being overlooked, places the princess under an enchantment as her gift: the princess will prick her hand on a spindle and die. One fairy who hadn't yet given her gift, uses it to reverse the evil fairy's curse, but she can only do so partially: instead of dying, the princess will fall into a deep sleep for 100 years and be awoken by a king's son. A hundred years pass and a prince from another family spies the hidden castle during a hunting expedition. His attendants tell him differing stories regarding the happenings in the castle until an old man recounts his father's words: within the castle lies a beautiful princess who is doomed to sleep for a hundred years, whereupon a king's son is to come and awaken her. T
Fairy tales and stories of the 'Arabian Nights' order are not often attempted by modern imaginations, but collections of the old legends are perennially popular. Mr. Andrew Lang has not yet exhausted the supply of these last, although he has to go to countries more and more remote for every new year's gleanings. For the material in his latest volume, ' The Brown Fairy Book ', he has searched the folk lore of the red Indians, the black Australians, the African Kaffirs, and the natives of Brazil and New Caledonia. Besides these, there are some tales of moment from the French and Persian, some of them being specially translated for this work. The beautiful illustrations in color are the work of Mr. Henry Ford. This book is illustrated and annotated with a rare extensive biographical sketch of the author, Andrew Lang, written by Sir Edmund Gosse, CB, a contemporary poet and writer. Contents: What The Rose Did To The Cypress Ball-Carrier And The Bad One How Ball-Carrier Finished His Task The Bunyip Father Grumbler The Story Of The Yara The Cunning Hare The Turtle And His Bride How Geirald The Coward Was Punished Hábogi How The Little Brother Set Free His Big Brothers The Sacred Milk Of Koumongoé The Wicked Wolverine The Husband Of The Rat's Daughter The Mermaid And The Boy Pivi And Kabo The Elf Maiden How Some Wild Animals Became Tame Ones Fortune And The Wood-Cutter The Enchanted Head The Sister Of The Sun The Prince And The Three Fates The Fox And The Lapp Kisa The Cat The Lion And The Cat Which Was The Foolishest? Asmund And Signy Rübezahl Story Of The King Who Would Be Stronger Than Fate Story Of Wali Dâd The Simple-Hearted Tale Of A Tortoise And Of A Mischievous Monkey The Knights Of The Fish
It has been known for some time that Mr. Lang has added ghosts to his hobbies. In the volume before us, " The Book of Dreams and Ghosts,'' Mr. Lang offers a large collection of ghost stories old and new, and his opinions on "appearances." As far as we can gather Mr. Lang's attitude from these pages, which have much of the vagueness of expression that goes with memoirs of the supernatural, he disbelieves in traditional ghosts, the ghosts that do things-but wishes it were otherwise. Like all persons of poetical or romantic temperament, he would prefer to believe in them. They would make life so much more interesting and exciting. This book is annotated with a rare extensive biographical sketch of the author, Andrew Lang, written by Sir Edmund Gosse, CB, a contemporary poet and writer. From the contents: The Dog Fanti Mark Twain's Story The Pig In The Dining-Room The Mignonette The Lost Cheque The Ducks' Eggs The Lost Key The Lost Securities The Arrears Of Teind The Two Curmas The Assyrian Priest The Knot In The Shutter Queen Mary's Jewels The Deathbed Dream Of Mr. Perceval's Murder The Rattlesnake The Red Lamp The Scar In The Moustache The Coral Sprigs The Satin Slippers The Dead Shopman Story Of The Diplomatist Under The Lamp The Cow With The Bell The Deathbed Of Louis Xiv. The Old Family Coach Riding Home From Mess The Bright Scar The Vision And The Portrait The Restraining Hand The Benedictine's Voices The Man At The Lift The Wraith Of The Czarina An "Astral Body" In Tavistock Place The Wynyard Wraith Lord Brougham's Story The Dying Mother The Vision Of The Bride ... and much more ...
The Mystery of the Man in the Iron Mask is, despite a pleasant saying of Lord Beaconsfield's, one of the most fascinating in history. By a curious coincidence the wildest legend on the subject, and the correct explanation of the problem, were offered to the world in the same year, 1801. According to this form of the legend, the Man in the Iron Mask was the genuine Louis XIV., deprived of his rights in favour of a child of Anne of Austria and of Mazarin. Immured in the Isles Sainte-Marguerite, in the bay of Cannes (where you are shown his cell, looking north to the sunny town), he married, and begot a son. That son was carried to Corsica, was named de Buona Parte, and was the ancestor of Napoleon. The Emperor was thus the legitimate representative of the House of Bourbon.
This legend was circulated in 1801, and is referred to in a proclamation of the Royalists of La Vendee. In the same year, 1801, Roux Fazaillac, a Citoyen and a revolutionary legislator, published a work in which he asserted that the Man in the Iron Mask (as known in rumour) was not one man, but a myth, in which the actual facts concerning at least two men were blended. It is certain that Roux Fazaillac was right; or that, if he was wrong, the Man in the Iron Mask was an obscure valet, of French birth, residing in England, whose real name was Martin.
Before we enter on the topic of this poor menial's tragic history, it may be as well to trace the progress of the romantic legend, as it blossomed after the death of the Man, whose Mask was not of iron, but of black velvet. Later we shall show how the legend struck root and flowered, from the moment when the poor valet, Martin (by his prison pseudonym 'Eustache Dauger'), was immured in the French fortress of Pignerol, in Piedmont (August 1669).
This book is annotated with a rare extensive biographical sketch of the author, Andrew Lang, written by Sir Edmund Gosse, CB, a contemporary poet and writer. Mr. Kirk's little book was written in 1691 and was probably not printed until 1815, when an edition of only one hundred copies appeared at Edinburgh from the press of James Ballantyne & Company for Longman & Company of London. Mr. Kirk's book is the most curious imaginable. Written in 1691 by a Scotch divine, it is nothing less than a calm assumption of the existence at that time of a commonwealth of elves, fauns, and fairies, whose government, habits, etc., are minutely described upon the authority of "Men of Second Sight" (it is not clear whether the author himself was one of these by virtue of bis being a seventh son), the method of obtaining which gift is also carefully explained. These fairies are of a middle nature between man and angel; they inhabit subterranean abodes, which they change at each quarter of the year. "They are distributed in tribes and orders, and have children, nurses, marriages, deaths, and burials; their apparel and speech is like that of the people and country under which they live; they are said to have aristocratical rulers and laws, but no discernible religion, love, or devotion towards God," their weapons are most what solid earthly bodies, nothing of iron, but much of stone, like to yellow soft flint spa, shaped liked a barbed arrow-head, but flung like a dart, with great force." The moral character of these "subterraneans" is minutely described and the conclusion is, "But for swearing and intemperance, they are not observed so subject to those irregularities, as to envy, spite, hypocrisy, lying, and dissimulation." The author adds to the evidence given by his friends, etc., a letter from Lord Tarbott to the Hon. Robert Boyle, in which many additional instances of second sight are narrated.
This book is annotated with a rare extensive biographical sketch of the author, Andrew Lang, written by Sir Edmund Gosse, CB, a contemporary poet and writer. A review of Mr. Lang's work would come late, were it not that the book has been the subject of discussion for many years.The author considers the modern science of the History of Religion to teach, that Man derived the conception of Spirit from reflection on phenomena of sleep, dreams, death, shadow, and experiences of trance and hallucination. Ghosts, thus obtained, became the first objects of belief and worship, and were gradually magnified into gods, of which, in the end, one became supreme; on the other hand, from belief in the survival of the soul grew the notion of immortality. This system he proposes to study from fresh points of view. In the first place, he treats what he calls the X phenomena among savages, clairvoyance, crystalomancy, second-sight, demoniacal possession, and so on, giving examples to show the prevalence of similar experiences; he considers that their apparently supernatural character may have much to do with the theory of a separable soul, and apparently inclines toward a belief in the verity at least of the occurrences. The statements concerning the savage phenomena are not especially full, the account not undertaking to exhibit a complete view of the department. The second part of the treatise undertakes to supply a substitute for the nihilistic doctrine; this is, that the idea of God as, to use the writer's words, " a primal eternal being, author of all things, the father and friendof man, the invisible, omniscient guardian of morality, belongs to the lowest savages, who reverence this supreme deity without idol-worship or sacrifice, as immutable, impeccable, all-seeing, benevolent, and lovable.
This is the peculiar title of a book that is making something of a literary sensation. This brilliant study of the betrayal and extinction of Jacobitism has triumphantly solved a mystery which once baffled all Europe. History has so far sought in vain to follow the wanderings and intrigues of Prince Charles Edward, the Young Pretender, after his expulsion from France in the last days of 1748. "From this time forward," says Lord Stanhope, writing of the time when the Prince quitted Avignon early in 1749, "his proceedings during many years are wrapped in mystery; all his correspondence passed through the hands of Mr. Walters"--according to Mr. Lang the name should be Waters-"his banker at Paris, even his warmest partisans were seldom made acquainted with his place of abode, and though he still continued to write to his father at intervals, his letters were never dated. Neither friends nor enemies at that time could obtain any certain information of his movements or designs. Now, however, it is known that he visited Venice and Germany, that he resided secretly for some time at Paris, that he undertook a mysterious journey to England in 1750, and perhaps another in 1752 or 1753; but his principal residence was in the territory of his friend the Dukede Bouillon, where, surrounded by the wide and lonely forest of Ardennes, his active spirit sought in the dangerous chase of boars and wolves an image of the warlike enterprise which was denied him. It was not till the death of his father in 1766 that he returned to Rome and became reconciled to his brother. But his character had darkened with his fortunes."
'Many a man,' says De Quincey, 'can trace his ruin to a murder, of which, perhaps, he thought little enough at the time.' This remark applies with peculiar force to Philip II. of Spain, to his secretary, Antonio Perez, to the steward of Perez, to his page, and to a number of professional ruffians. All of these, from the King to his own scullion, were concerned in the slaying of Juan de Escovedo, secretary of Philip's famous natural brother, Don John of Austria. All of them, in different degrees, had bitter reason to regret a deed which, at the moment, seemed a commonplace political incident.
The puzzle in the case of Escovedo does not concern the manner of his taking off, or the identity of his murderers. These things are perfectly well known; the names of the guilty, from the King to the bravo, are ascertained. The mystery clouds the motives for the deed. Why was Escovedo done to death? Did the King have him assassinated for purely political reasons, really inadequate, but magnified by the suspicious royal fancy? Or were the secretary of Philip II. and the monarch of Spain rivals in the affections of a one-eyed widow of rank? and did the secretary, Perez, induce Philip to give orders for Escovedo's death, because Escovedo threatened to reveal to the King their guilty intrigue? Sir William Stirling-Maxwell and Monsieur Mignet accepted, with shades of difference, this explanation. Mr. Froude, on the other hand, held that Philip acted for political reasons, and with the full approval of his very ill-informed conscience. There was no lady as a motive in the case, in Mr. Froude's opinion. A third solution is possible: Philip, perhaps, wished to murder Escovedo for political reasons, and without reference to the tender passion; but Philip was slow and irresolute, while Perez, who dreaded Escovedo's interference with his love affair, urged his royal master on to the crime which he was shirking. We may never know the exact truth, but at least we can study a state of morals and manners at Madrid, compared with which the blundering tragedies of Holyrood, in Queen Mary's time, seem mere child's play. The 'lambs' of Bothwell are lambs playful and gentle when set beside the instruments of Philip II.
Mr. Carlyle not unjustly described the tragedy of Mary Stuart as but a personal incident in the true national History of Scotland. He asked for other and more essential things than these revelations of high life. Yet he himself wrote in great detail the story of the Diamond Necklace of Marie Antoinette. The diamonds of the French, the silver Casket of the Scottish Queen, with all that turned on them, are of real historical interest, for these trifles brought to the surface the characters and principles of men living in an age of religious revolution. Wells were sunk, as it were, deep into human personality, and the inner characteristics of the age leaped upwards into the light.
For this reason the Mystery of Mary Stuart must always fascinate: moreover, curiosity has never ceased to be aroused by this problem of Mary’s guilt or innocence. Hume said, a hundred and fifty years ago, that the Scottish Jacobite who believed in the Queen’s innocence was beyond the reach of reason or argument. Yet from America, Russia, France, and Germany we receive works in which the guilt of Mary is denied, and the arguments of Hume, Robertson, Laing, Mignet, and Froude are contested. Every inch of the ground has been inspected as if by detectives on the scene of a recent murder; and one might suppose that the Higher Criticism had uttered its last baseless conjecture and that every syllable of the fatal Casket Letters, the only external and documentary testimony to Mary’s guilt, must have been weighed, tested, and analysed. But this, as we shall see, is hardly the fact. There are ‘points as yet unseized by Germans.’ Mary was never tried by a Court of Justice during her lifetime. Her cause has been in process of trial ever since. Each newly discovered manuscript, like the fragmentary biography by her secretary, Nau, and the Declaration of the Earl of Morton, and the newly translated dispatches of the Spanish ambassadors, edited by Major Martin Hume (1894), has brought fresh light, and has modified the tactics of the attack and defence.
©2021 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.