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Sadly, Thackeray is seldom read nowadays. Except for 'Vanity Fair', he is mostly unknown and yet many of his contemporaries rated him as highly as Dickens. This comprehensive eBook aims to reveal the true genius of this master storyteller, featuring the complete works, with beautiful illustrations and special bonus texts. (Version 4)

* illustrated with hundreds of images, relating to Thackeray’s life and works
* annotated with concise introductions to the novels and other texts
* images of how the monthly serials first appeared, giving your eReader a taste of the original Victorian texts
* ALL 12 novels, many with their original illustrations
* even includes the rare unfinished novel ‘A Shabby Genteel Story’
* also includes the rare novels ‘Lovel the Widower’, ‘Adventures of Philip’ and the unfinished novel ‘Denis Duval’
* ALL of the short stories and novellas, with excellent formatting
* even INCLUDES Thackeray’s poetry, essays and Punch articles
* ALL of the travel writing and sketches, with many illustrations
* includes Trollope’s biography of Thackeray
* scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres
* master table of contents to allow easy navigation around Thackeray’s immense oeuvre.
* includes Thackeray’s Collected Letters from 1847-1855

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CONTENTS

The Novels
CATHERINE
A SHABBY GENTEEL STORY
THE LUCK OF BARRY LYNDON
VANITY FAIR
THE HISTORY OF PENDENNIS
MEN’S WIVES
THE HISTORY OF HENRY ESMOND, ESQ.
THE NEWCOMES
THE VIRGINIANS
THE ADVENTURES OF PHILIP
LOVEL THE WIDOWER
DENIS DUVAL

The Shorter Fiction
ELIZABETH BROWNRIGGE
SULTAN STORK
LITTLE SPITZ
THE PROFESSOR
MISS LÖWE
THE YELLOWPLUSH PAPERS
THE TREMENDOUS ADVENTURES OF MAJOR GAHAGAN
THE FATAL BOOTS
COX’S DIARY
THE BEDFORD-ROW CONSPIRACY
THE HISTORY OF SAMUEL TITMARSH AND THE GREAT HOGGARTY DIAMOND
THE FITZ-BOODLE PAPERS
THE DIARY OF C. JEAMES DE LA PLUCHE, ESQ. WITH HIS LETTERS
A LEGEND OF THE RHINE
A LITTLE DINNER AT TIMMINS’S
REBECCA AND ROWENA
BLUEBEARD’S GHOST

The Christmas Books
MRS. PERKINS’S BALL
OUR STREET
DOCTOR BIRCH AND HIS YOUNG FRIENDS
THE KICKLEBURYS ON THE RHINE
THE ROSE AND THE RING

The Sketches and Satires
CONTRIBUTIONS TO “THE SNOB”
FLORE ET ZEPHYR
THE IRISH SKETCH BOOK
THE BOOK OF SNOBS
ROUNDABOUT PAPERS
SOME ROUNDABOUT PAPERS
DICKENS IN FRANCE
CHARACTER SKETCHES
SKETCHES AND TRAVELS IN LONDON
MR. BROWN’S LETTERS
THE PROSER
MISCELLANIES

The Play
THE WOLVES AND THE LAMB

The Poetry
LIST OF THE COMPLETE POETRY

The Travel Writing
NOTES OF A JOURNEY FROM CORNHILL TO GRAND CAIRO
THE PARIS SKETCH BOOK
LITTLE TRAVELS AND ROADSIDE SKETCHES

The Non-Fiction
NOVELS BY EMINENT HANDS
THE HISTORY OF THE NEXT FRENCH REVOLUTION
THE SECOND FUNERAL OF NAPOLEON
GEORGE CRUIKSHANK
JOHN LEECH’S PICTURES OF LIFE AND CHARACTER
THE ENGLISH HUMOURISTS OF THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY
THE FOUR GEORGES
CRITICAL REVIEWS
A LECTURE ON “CHARITY AND HUMOUR”
VARIOUS ESSAYS, LETTERS, SKETCHES, ETC.
THE HISTORY OF DIONYSIUS DIDDLER.
CONTRIBUTIONS TO PUNCH
MISS TICKLETOBY’S LECTURES ON ENGLISH HISTORY
PAPERS BY THE FAT CONTRIBUTOR
MISCELLANEOUS CONTRIBUTIONS TO “PUNCH”
“SPEC” AND “PROSER” PAPERS
A PLAN FOR A PRIZE NOVEL

The Letters
A COLLECTION OF LETTERS 1847-1855

The Biography
THACKERAY BY ANTHONY TROLLOPE

In Memoriam W. M. Thackeray by Charles Dickens

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 On the 18th day of April last I went to see a friend in a neighboring Crescent, and on the steps of the next house beheld a group something like that here depicted. A newsboy had stopped in his walk, and was reading aloud the journal which it was his duty to deliver; a pretty orange-girl, with a heap of blazing fruit, rendered more brilliant by one of those great blue papers in which oranges are now artfully wrapped, leant over the railing and listened; and opposite the nympham discentem there was a capering and acute-eared young satirist of a crossing-sweeper, who had left his neighboring professional avocation and chance of profit, in order to listen to the tale of the little newsboy.

That intelligent reader, with his hand following the line as he read it out to his audience, was saying:—"And—now—Tom—coming up smiling—after his fall—dee—delivered a rattling clinker upon the Benicia Boy's—potato-trap—but was met by a—punisher on the nose—which," &c. &c.; or words to that effect. Betty at 52 let me in, while the boy was reading his lecture and, having been some twenty minutes or so in the house and paid my visit, I took leave.

The little lecturer was still at work on the 51 doorstep, and his audience had scarcely changed their position. Having read every word of the battle myself in the morning, I did not stay to listen further; but if the gentleman who expected his paper at the usual hour that day experienced delay and a little disappointment I shall not be surprised.

I am not going to expatiate on the battle. I have read in the correspondent's letter of a Northern newspaper, that in the midst of the company assembled the reader's humble servant was present, and in a very polite society, too, of "poets, clergymen, men of letters, and members of both Houses of Parliament." If so, I must have walked to the station in my sleep, paid three guineas in a profound fit of mental abstraction, and returned to bed unconscious, for I certainly woke there about the time when history relates that the fight was over. I do not know whose colors I wore—the Benician's, or those of the Irish champion; nor remember where the fight took place, which, indeed, no somnambulist is bound to recollect. Ought Mr. Sayers to be honored for being brave, or punished for being naughty? By the shade of Brutus the elder, I don't know....
PREFATORY REMARKS
Chapter I. THE SNOB PLAYFULLY DEALT WITH
Chapter II. THE SNOB ROYAL
Chapter III. THE INFLUENCE OF THE ARISTOCRACY ON SNOBS
Chapter IV. THE COURT CIRCULAR, AND ITS INFLUENCE ON SNOBS
Chapter V. WHAT SNOBS ADMIRE
Chapter VI. ON SOME RESPECTABLE SNOBS
Chapter VII. ON SOME RESPECTABLE SNOBS
Chapter VIII. GREAT CITY SNOBS
Chapter IX. ON SOME MILITARY SNOBS
Chapter X. MILITARY SNOBS
Chapter XI. ON CLERICAL SNOBS
Chapter XII. ON CLERICAL SNOBS AND SNOBBISHNESS
Chapter XIII. ON CLERICAL SNOBS
Chapter XIV. ON UNIVERSITY SNOBS
Chapter XV. ON UNIVERSITY SNOBS
Chapter XVI. ON LITERARY SNOBS
Chapter XVII. A LITTLE ABOUT IRISH SNOBS
Chapter XVIII. PARTY-GIVING SNOBS
Chapter XIX. DINING-OUT SNOBS
Chapter XX. DINNER-GIVING SNOBS FURTHER CONSIDERED
Chapter XXI. SOME CONTINENTAL SNOBS
Chapter XXII. CONTINENTAL SNOBBERY CONTINUED
Chapter XXIII. ENGLISH SNOBS ON THE CONTINENT
Chapter XXIV. ON SOME COUNTRY SNOBS
Chapter XXV. A VISIT TO SOME COUNTRY SNOBS
Chapter XXVI. ON SOME COUNTRY SNOBS
Chapter XXVII. A VISIT TO SOME COUNTRY SNOBS
Chapter XXVIII. ON SOME COUNTRY SNOBS
Chapter XXIX. A VISIT TO SOME COUNTRY SNOBS
Chapter XXX. ON SOME COUNTRY SNOBS
Chapter XXXI. A VISIT TO SOME COUNTRY SNOBS
Chapter XXXII. SNOBBIUM GATHERUM
Chapter XXXIII. SNOBS AND MARRIAGE
Chapter XXXIV. SNOBS AND MARRIAGE
Chapter XXXV. SNOBS AND MARRIAGE
Chapter XXXVI. SNOBS AND MARRIAGE
Chapter XXXVII. CLUB SNOBS
Chapter XXXVIII. CLUB SNOBS
Chapter XXXIX. CLUB SNOBS
Chapter XL. CLUB SNOBS
Chapter XLI. CLUB SNOBS
Chapter XLII. CLUB SNOBS
Chapter XLIII. CLUB SNOBS
Chapter XLIV. CLUB SNOBS
CONCLUDING OBSERVATIONS ON SNOBS
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