Peony: A Novel of China

· Open Road Media
4.0
24 reviews
Ebook
339
Pages
Eligible

About this ebook

A young Chinese woman falls in love with a Jewish man in nineteenth-century China in this evocative novel by the Nobel Prize–winning author of The Good Earth.

In 1850s China, a young girl, Peony, is sold to work as a bondmaid for a rich Jewish family in Kaifeng. Jews have lived for centuries in this region of the country, but by the mid-nineteenth century, assimilation has begun taking its toll on their small enclave. When Peony and the family’s son, David, grow up and fall in love with one another, they face strong opposition from every side. Tradition forbids the marriage, and the family already has a rabbi’s daughter in mind for David. Long celebrated for its subtle and even-handed treatment of colliding traditions, Peony is an engaging coming-of-age story about love, identity, and the tragedy and beauty found at the intersection of two disparate cultures.   This ebook features an illustrated biography of Pearl S. Buck including rare images from the author’s estate.
4.0
24 reviews
Gene Stark
December 28, 2020
"Peony", a novel book by Pearl Buck, is an excellent read about the challenges of a Jewish family living in China during the 19th century. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in this subject.
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Holly. Mulrooney
January 30, 2017
Sooooo beautiful.....
6 people found this review helpful
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Third-party review
Not as engaging as some of the Buck novels I've read. It was interesting to read about the assimilation of Jews into Chinese culture, but it was far too depressing and I never felt that David was worthy of Peony's love. He was weak and wishy-washy. She was strong and deserved better.

About the author

Pearl S. Buck (1892–1973) was a bestselling and Nobel Prize–winning author. Her classic novel The Good Earth (1931) was awarded a Pulitzer Prize and William Dean Howells Medal. Born in Hillsboro, West Virginia, Buck was the daughter of missionaries and spent much of the first half of her life in China, where many of her books are set. In 1934, civil unrest in China forced Buck back to the United States. Throughout her life she worked in support of civil and women’s rights, and established Welcome House, the first international, interracial adoption agency. In addition to her highly acclaimed novels, Buck wrote two memoirs and biographies of both of her parents. For her body of work, Buck received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1938, the first American woman to have done so. She died in Vermont. 

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