All the Fighting They Want: The Atlanta Campaign from Peachtree Creek to the City's Surrender, July 18–September 2, 1864

Grub Street Publishers
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The Civil War’s Atlanta campaign rages on following A Long and Bloody Task: “More than informative . . . challenges simplistic caricatures of Hood and Sherman” (The Civil War Monitor).
 
John Bell Hood brought a hang-dog look and a hard-fighting spirit to the Army of Tennessee. Once one of the ablest division commanders in the Army of Northern Virginia, he found himself, by the spring of 1864, in the war’s Western Theater. Recently recovered from grievous wounds sustained at Chickamauga, he suddenly found himself thrust into command of the Confederacy’s ill-starred army even as Federals pounded on the door of the Deep South’s greatest untouched city, Atlanta.
 
His predecessor, Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, had failed to stop the advance of armies under Federal commander William T. Sherman, who had pushed and maneuvered his way from Chattanooga, Tennessee, right to Atlanta’s very doorstep. Johnston had been able to do little to stop him.
 
The crisis could not have been more acute. Hood, an aggressive risk-taker, threw his men into the fray with unprecedented vigor. Sherman welcomed it.
 
“We’ll give them all the fighting they want,” Sherman said.
 
He proved a man of his word.
 
In All the Fighting They Want, Georgia native Steve Davis, the world’s foremost authority on the Atlanta campaign, tells the tale of the last great struggle for the city. His Southern sensibility and his knowledge of the battle, accumulated over a lifetime of living on the ground, make this an indispensable addition to the acclaimed Emerging Civil War Series.
 
“Military historian Steve Davis vividly presents the last great struggle for the city.” —Midwest Book Review
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About the author

Stephen Davis, longtime Atlantan, has been a Civil Warrior since the fourth grade. He served as Book Review Editor for Blue & Gray magazine for more than twenty years, and is the author of more than a hundred articles on the Civil War in both scholarly and popular journals. His book Atlanta Will Fall: Sherman, Joe Johnston and the Yankee Heavy Battalions, was published in 2001. He is also the author of What the Yankees Did to Us: Sherman’s Bombardment and Wrecking of Atlanta (2012).

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Additional Information

Publisher
Grub Street Publishers
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Published on
Dec 15, 2016
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Pages
192
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ISBN
9781611213201
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Military / United States
History / Military / Wars & Conflicts (Other)
History / United States / Civil War Period (1850-1877)
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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“Explores the first phase of General William Tecumseh Sherman’s Atlanta Campaign in the summer of 1864 . . . Clear and concise” (The Civil War Monitor).
 
Poised on the edge of Georgia for the first time in the war, Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman, newly elevated to command the Union’s western armies, eyed Atlanta covetously—the South’s last great untouched prize. “Get into the interior of the enemy’s country as far as you can, inflicting all the damage you can against their War resources,” his superior, Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, ordered.
 
But blocking the way was the Confederate Army of Tennessee, commanded by one of the Confederacy’s most defensive-minded generals, Joseph E. Johnston. All Johnston had to do, as Sherman moved through hostile territory, was slow the Federal advance long enough to find the perfect opportunity to strike.
 
And so began the last great campaign in the West: Sherman’s long and bloody task.
 
The acknowledged expert on all things related to the battle of Atlanta, historian Stephen Davis has lived in the area his entire life, and in A Long and Bloody Task, he tells the tale of the Atlanta campaign as only a native can. He brings his Southern sensibility to the Emerging Civil War Series, known for its engaging storytelling and accessible approach to history.
 
“An operational level narrative and tour of the first two and a half months of the Atlanta Campaign . . . A fine overview of military events in North Georgia.” —Civil War Books and Authors
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