When the Century Was Young: A Writer's Notebook

Open Road Media
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The insightful and heartwarming memoir of one of twentieth-century America’s most celebrated frontier writers
Dee Brown’s fascinating memoir describes a writer’s evolution—and a time when catching rides on trains or seeing the landing of a Curtiss Jenny airplane were simple and profound pleasures. Brown traces his upbringing in Arkansas in the early 1900s, and the oil boom that hit his tiny town. He writes of how he fell under the spell of books and history, and of his eventual work as a journalist and printer before finding his true love—the American West—which would lead to his penning the classic Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. Written with gentle humor and a scholar’s curiosity, When the Century Was Young is a wistful look at youth during a poignant moment in American history. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Dee Brown including rare photos from the author’s personal collection.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Open Road Media
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Published on
Oct 23, 2012
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Pages
233
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ISBN
9781453274217
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Editors, Journalists, Publishers
Biography & Autobiography / Personal Memoirs
History / Social History
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Reflections on America and the American experience as he has lived and observed it by the bestselling author of The Greatest Generation, whose iconic career in journalism has spanned more than fifty years

From his parents’ life in the Thirties, on to his boyhood along the Missouri River and on the prairies of South Dakota in the Forties, into his early journalism career in the Fifties and the tumultuous Sixties, up to the present, this personal story is a reflection on America in our time. Tom Brokaw writes about growing up and coming of age in the heartland, and of the family, the people, the culture and the values that shaped him then and still do today.

His father, Red Brokaw, a genius with machines, followed the instincts of Tom’s mother Jean, and took the risk of moving his small family from an Army base to Pickstown, South Dakota, where Red got a job as a heavy equipment operator in the Army Corps of Engineers’ project building the Ft. Randall dam along the Missouri River. Tom Brokaw describes how this move became the pivotal decision in their lives, as the Brokaw family, along with others after World War II, began to live out the American Dream: community, relative prosperity, middle class pleasures and good educations for their children.

“Along the river and in the surrounding hills, I had a Tom Sawyer boyhood,” Brokaw writes; and as he describes his own pilgrimage as it unfolded—from childhood to love, marriage, the early days in broadcast journalism, and beyond—he also reflects on what brought him and so many Americans of his generation to lead lives a long way from home, yet forever affected by it.

Praise for A Long Way from Home

“[A] love letter to the . . . people and places that enriched a ‘Tom Sawyer boyhood.’ Brokaw . . . has a knack for delivering quirky observations on small-town life. . . . Bottom line: Tom’s terrific.”—People

“Breezy and straightforward . . . much like the assertive TV newsman himself.”—Los Angeles Times

“Brokaw writes with disarming honesty.”—The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

“Brokaw evokes a sense of community, a pride of citizenship, and a confidence in American ideals that will impress his readers.”—Richmond Times-Dispatch
When Thomas D. Clark was hired to teach history at the University of Kentucky in 1931, he began a career that would span nearly three-quarters of a century and would profoundly change not only the history department and the university but the entire Commonwealth. His still-definitive History of Kentucky (1937) was one of more than thirty books he would write or edit that dealt with Kentucky, the South, and the American frontier.

In addition to his wide scholarly contributions, Clark devoted his life to the preservation of Kentucky's historical records. He began this crusade by collecting vast stores of Kentucky's military records from the War of 1812, the Mexican War, and the Civil War. His efforts resulted in the Commonwealth's first archival system and the subsequent creation of the Kentucky Library and Archives, the University of Kentucky Special Collections and Archives, the Kentucky Oral History Commission, the Kentucky History Center (recently named for him), and the University Press of Kentucky.

Born in 1903 on a cotton farm in Louisville, Mississippi, Thomas Dionysius Clark would follow a long and winding path to find his life's passion in the study of history. He dropped out of school after seventh grade to work first at a sawmill and then on a canal dredgeboat before resuming his formal education. Clark's earliest memories -- hearing about local lynch-mob violence and witnessing the destruction of virgin forest -- are an invaluable window into the national issues of racial injustice and environmental depredation. In many ways, the story of Dr. Clark's life is the story of America in the twentieth century. In My Century in History, Clark offers vivid memories of his journey, both personal and academic, a journey that took him from Mississippi to Kentucky and North Carolina, to leadership of the nation's major historical organizations, and to visiting professorships in Austria, England, Greece, and India, as well as in universities throughout the United States.

An enormously popular public lecturer and teacher, he touched thousands of lives in Kentucky and around the world. With his characteristic wit and insight, Clark now offers his many admirers one final volume of history -- his own.

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