A History of Chowder: Four Centuries of a New England Meal

Arcadia Publishing
Free sample

The evolution of New England’s famous culinary classic: chowder, in all its mouthwatering varieties—from the authors of Massachusetts Cranberry Culture.
 
New England’s culinary history is marked by a varying array of chowders. Early forms were thick and layered, but the adaptability of this beloved recipe has allowed for a multitude of tasty preparations to emerge. Thick or thin, brimming with fish or clams or corn, chowder springs up throughout the region in as many distinctive varieties as there are ports of call, yet always remains the quintessential expression of New England cuisine. Food writers and chowder connoisseurs Robert S. Cox and Jacob Walker dish out the history, flavors, and significance of every New Englander’s favorite comfort food.
 
Includes photos!
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About the author

Jacob Walker spends most of his time along the coast of Massachusetts. He is the creator of the New England Chowder Compendium, a nationally recognized project at the University of MassachusettsAmherst devoted to examining all things chowder.

Rob Cox spends far too little time along the coast of Massachusetts. A former paleontologist and molecular biologist, he has a doctorate in history from the University of Michigan and works at the University of MassachusettsAmherst. He is author of Body and Soul: A Sympathetic History of American Spiritualism (Charlottesville, 2003) and editor of and contributor to The Shortest and Most Convenient Route: Lewis and Clark in Context (Philadelphia, 2004).

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Additional Information

Publisher
Arcadia Publishing
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Published on
Apr 1, 2011
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Pages
131
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ISBN
9781614233503
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Language
English
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Genres
Cooking / Regional & Ethnic / American / New England
History / United States / State & Local / New England (CT, MA, ME, NH, RI, VT)
Travel / United States / Northeast / New England (CT, MA, ME, NH, RI, VT)
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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If you think traditional New England cooking is little more than baked beans and clam chowder, think again. In this enticing anthology of almost 400 historic New England recipes from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century, you will be treated to such dishes as wine-soaked bass served with oysters and cranberries, roast shoulder of lamb seasoned with sweet herbs, almond cheesecake infused with rosewater, robust Connecticut brown bread, zesty ginger nuts, and high-peaked White Mountain cake.

Beginning with four chapters placing the region's best-known cookbook authors and their works in nuanced historical context, Keith Stavely and Kathleen Fitzgerald then proceed to offer a ten-chapter cornucopia of culinary temptation. Readers can sample regional offerings grouped into the categories of the liquid one-pot meal, fish, fowl, meat and game, pie, pudding, bread, and cake. Recipes are presented in their original textual forms and are accompanied by commentaries designed to make them more accessible to the modern reader. Each chapter, and each section within each chapter, is also prefaced by a brief introductory essay. From pottage to pie crust, from caudle to calf's head, historic methods and obscure meanings are thoroughly -- sometimes humorously -- explained.

Going beyond reprints of single cookbooks and bland adaptations of historic recipes, this richly contextualized critical anthology puts the New England cooking tradition on display in all its unexpected--and delicious--complexity. Northern Hospitality will equip readers with all the tools they need for both historical understanding and kitchen adventure.

Mrs. Howland’s New England Economical Housekeeper, and Family Receipt Book is a regional cookbook with strong emphasis on thrift and self-reliance in the home, common themes in early American cookbooks that also reflected her New England heritage. Over 220 classic New England recipes, simple and well written compared with many contemporary cookbooks, are included. It's interesting to note that fifty of the recipes are for puddings. The “Medicinal Department” section offers cures and common remedies for ailments from cancer and consumption to corns and chapped hands, and “Miscellaneous Receipts” discusses household tips (how to make soap, prevent the gate from creaking, keep red ants from the cupboard) and morality (“Two rules of Jefferson are very applicable to the times—‘Never spend your money before you get it;’ and ‘Never buy what you do not want because it is cheap.’”)  The book also contains an early technique for mouth-to-mouth resuscitation and CPR, and well as other advice for household emergencies, such as fires. Mrs. Howland’s book was very popular and stayed in print for over forty-five years with various titles and editions. This edition of The New England Economical Housekeeper, and Family Receipt Book was reproduced by permission from the volume in the collection of the American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, Massachusetts. Founded in 1812 by Isaiah Thomas, a Revolutionary War patriot and successful printer and publisher, the society is a research library documenting the lives of Americans from the colonial era through 1876. The society collects, preserves, and makes available as complete a record as possible of the printed materials from the early American experience. The cookbook collection comprises approximately 1,100 volumes.
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