Loss of Eden: A Biography of Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh

Open Road Media
Free sample

For the first time, Joyce Milton gives us the dual biography of the wonder couple, Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh. Their love prevailed against a horrifying kidnapping and murder splashed throughout the media, their careers, and even the criticism they underwent following their involvement in the America First movement as the United States entered World War II. With new information presented about their son’s kidnapper, Bruno Hauptmann, and Charlie’s own role in the case, Milton gives her readers a lot to think about. Thoroughly researched, Milton exposes a new understanding of and view into the personalities and lives of Charles, Anne, and the time they lived in.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Open Road Media
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Published on
Jul 1, 2014
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Pages
528
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ISBN
9781497659131
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Adventurers & Explorers
Biography & Autobiography / Rich & Famous
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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This book is the documented record of flying small aircraft over a fifty-four-year period as a FAA certificated private pilot. With exceptions for the eighteen married years that I flew very little (or not at all), each chapter tells of the yearly flying experiences for the calendar years beginning with 1956 and ending with 2010. I used notes recorded in my log books to recall memories of the flights. Now retired after a thirty-eight-year career with McDonnell Aircraft Co., then McDonnell-Douglas Corp., then Boeing (as the names changed), my career began as a FAA certificated airframe and powerplant mechanic with Ozark Airlines based in St. Louis, Missouri. Four years of the ten-year period I worked for Ozark were on a military leave of absence while I served in the U.S. Air Force. Frequently, I tell of related incidents and stories of interest that relate to the particular time period. Piloting airplanes was not my career choice; however, being active as an airplane mechanic complimented the flying activities nicely. The FAA has recognized my contributions to building and maintaining the safest aviation system in the world by presenting me with the Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award for fifty years as a pilot, and by also presenting the Charles Taylor Master Mechanic Award for fifty years as an A&P Mechanic. Another branch of the FAA was not so complimentary, however, as my flying days ended abruptly in 2011 when the FAA Medical Center denied my third class medical certificate over a series of very trivial issues and multiple letter exchanges. The details are documented in the epilogue of my book.
In April 1992 a young man from a well-to-do family hitchhiked to Alaska and walked alone into the wilderness north of Mt. McKinley. His name was Christopher Johnson McCandless. He had given $25,000 in savings to charity, abandoned his car and most of his possessions, burned all the cash in his wallet, and invented a new life for himself. Four months later, his decomposed body was found by a moose hunter.  How McCandless came to die is the unforgettable story of Into the Wild.

Immediately after graduating from college in 1991, McCandless had roamed through the West and Southwest on a vision quest like those made by his heroes Jack London and John Muir.  In the Mojave Desert he abandoned his car, stripped it of its license plates, and burned all of his  cash.  He would give himself a new name, Alexander Supertramp, and , unencumbered by money and belongings, he would be free to wallow in the raw, unfiltered experiences that nature presented.  Craving a blank spot on the map, McCandless simply threw the maps away.  Leaving behind his desperate parents and sister, he vanished into the wild.

Jon Krakauer constructs a clarifying prism through which he reassembles the disquieting facts of McCandless's short life.  Admitting an interst that borders on obsession, he searches for the clues to the dries and desires that propelled McCandless.  Digging deeply, he takes an inherently compelling mystery and unravels the larger riddles it holds: the profound pull of the American wilderness on our imagination; the allure of high-risk activities to young men of a certain cast of mind; the complex, charged bond between fathers and sons.

When McCandless's innocent mistakes turn out to be irreversible and fatal, he becomes the stuff of tabloid headlines and is dismissed for his naiveté, pretensions, and hubris.  He is said  to have had a death wish but wanting to die is a very different thing from being compelled to look over the edge. Krakauer brings McCandless's uncompromising pilgrimage out of the shadows, and the peril, adversity , and renunciation sought by this enigmatic young man are illuminated with a rare understanding--and not an ounce of sentimentality. Mesmerizing, heartbreaking, Into the Wild is a tour de force. The power and luminosity of Jon Krakauer's stoytelling blaze through every page.
In 1998, Hillary Rodham Clinton became the most admired woman in America while also becoming the most visibly wronged wife in the world. Standing by her husband, President Bill Clinton, as she and the nation learned the truth behind the Monica Lewinsky scandal, the First Lady assumed two roles--dutiful spouse and passionate defense attorney--which she had played on numerous occasions during the course of their tumultuous yet politically unified relationship.

Now esteemed biographer and journalist Joyce Milton examines this formidable, fascinating woman, giving probing insight into the First Lady's character, her values and her career. In The First Partner, Milton goes behind the scenes at the Clinton White House and explores the First Lady's involvement in Travelgate, Filegate, the Health Care Task Force fiasco and fund-raising for the 1996 presidential campaign, showing how these controversies grew out of the tensions in her political partnership with Bill Clinton. Milton also describes how Mrs. Clinton's defensive reactions to her husband's chronic infidelities have often misfired and have sometimes enabled his bad behavior. She examines the differing psychologies of the President and First Lady, yet shows that when faced with political accusations, they take a similar approach of telling only as much of the truth as is necessary--a reaction that has increasingly gotten them into trouble.

Meticulously reported and researched, The First Partner offers keen new understanding of this complex woman who has infuriated and confounded as many people as she has inspired.

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